Timeline of Aden

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Aden, Yemen.

Prior to 19th century[edit]

19th century[edit]

  • 1839
    • January: Aden occupied by British forces.[5][6]
    • November: Abdali anti-British unrest; crackdown.[2]
    • British colonial postal mail begins operating.
  • 1840
    • May: Abdali anti-British unrest; crackdown.[2]
    • June: Sultan of Lahej Shaykh Muhsin ibn Fadl signs treaty with British.[5]
  • 1850 - Aden becomes a free port.[7]
  • 1852 - Catholic church built.[8]
  • 1858 - Grand Synagogue of Aden built.
  • 1867 - Aqueduct built.[1]
  • 1868 - Jebel Ihsan peninsula and nearby Sirah island sold by Sultan of Lahej to British.[4]
  • 1869 - Suez Canal opens in Egypt, affecting Aden as a port.[9]
  • 1871 - Protestant church built.[8]
  • 1876 - "Settlement committee" (local government) established.[5]
  • 1880 - August: French poet Rimbaud visits Aden.[10]
  • 1882 - Sheikh Othman bought by British.[8]
  • 1889 - "Port trust" (local government) established.[5]
  • 1890 - Big Ben Aden clocktower built.

20th century[edit]

1900s-1950s[edit]

1960s-1990s[edit]

21st century[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Britannica 1910.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Stanley 2008.
  3. ^ a b c d e Margariti 2006.
  4. ^ a b Gazetteer of India 1908.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h Thoman 1991.
  6. ^ BBC News. "Yemen Profile: Timeline". Retrieved 30 April 2015. 
  7. ^ Facey 1998.
  8. ^ a b c Kour 1981.
  9. ^ a b c d Robert D. Burrowes (2010). Historical Dictionary of Yemen (2nd ed.). Scarecrow Press. ISBN 978-0-8108-5528-1. 
  10. ^ Charles Nicholl (1999). Somebody Else: Arthur Rimbaud in Africa 1880-91. University of Chicago Press. ISBN 978-0-226-58029-6. 
  11. ^ "British Empire: Asia: Aden, Perim, Sokotra, and Kuria Muria Islands". Statesman's Year-Book. London: Macmillan and Co. 1921. p. 95+. 
  12. ^ "Aden", Encyclopædia Britannica, 30 (12th ed.), 1922 
  13. ^ a b c Sheila Carapico (1998). Civil Society in Yemen: the Political Economy of Activism in Modern Arabia. Cambridge Middle East Studies. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-03482-1. 
  14. ^ "Population of capital city and cities of 100,000 or more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 1955. New York: Statistical Office of the United Nations. 
  15. ^ Encyclopedia of Women and Islamic Cultures. Brill. 2005. ISBN 90-04-12818-2. 
  16. ^ a b "Yemen Time Line", Atlas of the Middle East, Washington DC: US Central Intelligence Agency, 1993 – via University of Texas, Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection 
  17. ^ "The Queen in Aden", British-Yemeni Society Journal, 20, 2012, OCLC 56766944, archived from the original on 2015-03-08 [1]
  18. ^ "Yemeni union calls for general strike to protest against low wages", BBC Monitoring Middle East, May 13, 2010 – via LexisNexis Academic, (Subscription required (help)) 
  19. ^ Rémy Leveau; et al., eds. (1999). Le Yémen contemporain (in French). Éditions Karthala (fr). ISBN 978-2-86537-893-7. 
  20. ^ a b "Museums: Yemen". Arabia Antica. University of Pisa. Retrieved 30 April 2015. 
  21. ^ "Yemen: Directory". Europa World Year Book. Europa Publications. 2004. p. 4714+. ISBN 978-1-85743-255-8. 
  22. ^ United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Statistical Office (1976). "Population of capital city and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 1975. New York. pp. 253–279. 
  23. ^ Lucine Taminian (1998). "Rimbaud's House in Aden, Yemen". Cultural Anthropology. 13. JSTOR 656569. 
  24. ^ Yemen: Aden, ArchNet, archived from the original on 2007-07-02 
  25. ^ Population of Yemen, 1994 census, Al-Bab.com, archived from the original on 8 September 2015, retrieved 30 April 2015 
  26. ^ Mark N. Katz (1997), Election Day in Aden, Al-Bab.com, archived from the original on 2015-10-18 
  27. ^ "Population of Capital Cities and Cities of 100,000 or More Inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 2013. United Nations Statistics Division. 
This article incorporates information from the Arabic Wikipedia and German Wikipedia.

Bibliography[edit]

Published in 19th century
Published in 20th century
Published in 21st century

External links[edit]