Timeline of Almaty

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Almaty, Almaty Province, Kazakhstan.

19th century[edit]

  • 1854 – Russian Verny Fort built.[1]
  • 1870s – Panfilov Park laid out.[2]
  • 1871 – Population: 12,000.[3]
  • 1884 – Synagogue established.[4]
  • 1887 – 9 June: A magnitude 7.3 earthquake affected the city with a maximum Mercalli intensity of X (Extreme), causing moderate damage.[5]

20th century[edit]

21st century[edit]

  • 2001 – Public Policy Research Center, and Center for Foreign Policy and Analysis founded.[22]
  • 2003 – International Institute for Modern Politics founded.[22]
  • 2006 – Protest.[25]
  • 2007 – Almaty Cup tennis tournament begins.
  • 2008
  • 2009 – Population: 1,365,105.[26]
  • 2011
  • 2012 – Population: 1,472,866.
  • 2013
  • 2014 – Economic protest.[29]
  • 2015 – Baibek Bauyrzhan becomes mayor.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ History of Civilizations of Central Asia, 6, Paris: UNESCO, 2005
  2. ^ "Almaty". Kazakhstan. Lonely Planet. Retrieved 9 April 2013.
  3. ^ Alexander Petzholdt (1878). "Zur Literatur uber Russisch-Turkestan". Russische Revue (in German). St. Petersburg. 13. OCLC 15861931. Wernoje
  4. ^ Encyclopedia of the Jewish diaspora, Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO, 2008, ISBN 9781851098736
  5. ^ a b National Geophysical Data Center / World Data Service (NGDC/WDS), Significant Earthquake Database, National Geophysical Data Center, NOAA, doi:10.7289/V5TD9V7K
  6. ^ Britannica 1910.
  7. ^ Russia, Leipzig: Karl Baedeker, 1914, OCLC 1328163, Vyerni
  8. ^ Adrian Room (2006), Placenames of the World (2nd ed.), Jefferson, NC: McFarland
  9. ^ a b Natasha Rapoport (2001), "Kazakhstan", in Don Rubin; et al., World Encyclopedia of Contemporary Theatre: Asia/Pacific, Routledge, ISBN 9780415260879
  10. ^ a b c d e f Leslie Champeny (2010), "Kazakhstan: Libraries, Archives and Museums", in Marcia J. Bates, Encyclopedia of Library and Information Sciences, Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press, ISBN 9780849397127
  11. ^ a b World Guide to Libraries (25th ed.), De Gruyter Saur, 2011, ISBN 9783110230710
  12. ^ a b c Peter Rollberg (2009), Historical dictionary of Russian and Soviet cinema, Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press, ISBN 9780810860728
  13. ^ Webster's Geographical Dictionary, Springfield, Mass., USA: G. & C. Merriam Co., 1960, OL 5812502M
  14. ^ Hae-Kyung Um, ed. (2005), Diasporas and Interculturalism in Asian Performing Arts, RoutledgeCurzon, ISBN 9780700715862
  15. ^ Henry W. Morton; Robert C. Stuart, eds. (1984). The Contemporary Soviet City. New York: M.E. Sharpe. ISBN 978-0-87332-248-5.
  16. ^ United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Statistical Office (1987). "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". 1985 Demographic Yearbook. New York. pp. 247–289. Alma-Ata
  17. ^ a b "Kazakhstan Profile: Timeline". BBC News. Retrieved 9 April 2013.
  18. ^ a b "WorldCat". Online Computer Library Center. Retrieved 9 April 2013.
  19. ^ "Akim". Almaty City. Retrieved 9 April 2013.
  20. ^ "History of Almaty". Almaty City. Retrieved 9 April 2013.
  21. ^ "Kazakhstan Stock Exchange". Retrieved 9 April 2013.
  22. ^ a b c "Think Tank Directory". Philadelphia: Foreign Policy Research Institute. Archived from the original on 10 November 2013. Retrieved 9 April 2013.
  23. ^ United Nations Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis, Statistics Division (1997). "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". 1995 Demographic Yearbook. New York. pp. 262–321.
  24. ^ ArchNet.org. "Almaty". Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA: MIT School of Architecture and Planning. Retrieved 9 April 2013.
  25. ^ Alexander 2007.
  26. ^ "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 or more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 2011. United Nations Statistics Division. 2012.
  27. ^ "Passenger plane crashes near Kazakh city of Almaty". BBC News. 29 January 2013.
  28. ^ David M. Herszenhorn (7 April 2013). "Negotiators Find in Kazakhstan the Perfect Place to Disagree". New York Times. Retrieved 9 April 2013.
  29. ^ "Kazakhstan: Devaluation, Demonstrations, and Lacy Underwear". Global Voices. 4 March 2014.

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 43°16′39″N 76°53′45″E / 43.2775°N 76.895833°E / 43.2775; 76.895833