Timeline of Artsakh history

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This is a timeline of Artsakh's history, representing territorial control under three columns:

  • Realm
    The highest level of authority.
  • State
    The state or administrative unit that the region of Artsakh belonged to.
  • Artsakh
    Geopolitical entity in Artsakh proper (Mountainous Karabakh).
Timeline of Artsakh History
  Albanian
  Arab
  Armenian
  Georgian
  Iranian
  Mongolian
  Roman
  Russian
  Turkic
  Other
Starting Date Realm State Artsakh
592 BC [1] Iran (Medes) Unknown (Urtekhini?)
549 BC Iran (Achaemenid dynasty)
321 BC Armenia (Orontid dynasty)
200 BC [2] Armenia (Artaxiad dynasty) Province of Artsakh [note 1]
53 BC [3] Iran (Arsacid dynasty) Armenia (Artaxiad dynasty)
36 BC  Rome
35 BC Armenia (Artaxiad dynasty)
33 BC  Rome Armenia (Artaxiad dynasty)
36 Iran (Arsacid dynasty)
47  Rome
51 [4] Iberia (Pharnavazid dynasty)
58 Armenia (Arsacid dynasty)
62 Iran (Arsacid dynasty)
63  Rome
64 Iran (Arsacid dynasty)
114 [5]  Rome Province of Armenia
118 Armenia (Arsacid dynasty)
252 Iran (Sassanian dynasty) Armenia (Arsacid dynasty)
287  Rome
363 Iran (Sassanian dynasty) Albania (Mihranid dynasty)
376 Armenia (Arsacid dynasty)
387 Iran (Sassanian dynasty) Albania (Mihranid dynasty)
654 Arab Caliphate Arminiya II — Albania (Mihranid dynasty),

al-Arminiya

850 Artsakh
884 Armenia (Bagratid dynasty) Artsakh
1045 Artsakh
1063 Seljuk Empire Artsakh
1092 Eldiguzids
1124 Georgia (Bagratid dynasty) Eldiguzids
1201 Armenia (Zakarid dynasty)
1214 [6][7]  Artsakh (Hasan-Jalalyan dynasty)
1236 Mongol Empire
1256 Ilkhanate
1261  Khachen (Hasan-Jalalyan dynasty)
1360 Karabakh
1337 Chobanids
1357 Jalayirids
1375 Kara Koyunlu
1387 Timurid Empire
1409 Kara Koyunlu
1468 Ak Koyunlu
1501  Iran (Safavid dynasty) Province of Karabakh Melikdoms of Karabakh (Khamsa) [note 2]
1583 Ottoman Empire
1603  Iran (Safavid dynasty)
1725
1736  Iran (Afsharid dynasty)
1747 [7] Karabakh Khanate
1751  Iran (Zand dynasty)
1797 Iran (Qajar dynasty)
1805-05 [7][note 3]  Russia (Romanov dynasty)
1822 [7]
1846 Shemakha Governorate [note 4]
1868 [7] Elisabethpol Governorate
1917-11-11 Transcaucasian Commissariat
1918-04-22 Transcaucasia [note 5]
1918-05-28 [7]  Armenia Armenian rebels
1918-06-04 [note 6]
1918-07-27 People's Government of Karabakh
1918-09  Ottoman Empire  Azerbaijan
1918-10-30 [note 7]  British Empire [note 8]
1919-08-22 [note 9]
1919-08-23 [note 10]
1920-03-04 [note 11]
1920-04-04  Azerbaijan
1920-04-09
1920-04-13 [note 12]
1920-04-22 [note 13]
1920-04-28 [note 14]  Armenia
1920-05-12 [7] Red Army  Azerbaijan SSR
1920-05-26 [note 15]
1920-12-01 [note 16]
1921-07-04 [7][note 17]
1922-03-12  Azerbaijan SSR,

 Transcaucasian SFSR

1922-12-30 [7]  Soviet Union
1923-07-07 [7][note 18] Nagorno-Karabakh Autonomous Oblast
1936-12-05  Azerbaijan SSR
1988-02-20 Nagorno-Karabakh War
1991-04-30 [note 19]
1991-09-02 [note 20]
1991-11-26 [7][note 21]
1994-05-12 [note 22]  Artsakh



Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The exact date of the establishment of the Province of Artsakh is not known, but it's believed to be sometime before 189 BC.
  2. ^ The Hasan-Jalalyan dynasty branches out sometime in the 16th century.
  3. ^ The Russian Empire occupies the lands, but they're formally annexed only in 1813 by the Treaty of Gulistan.
  4. ^ Shemakha Governorate was renamed to Baku Governorate in 1859.
  5. ^ The Transcaucasian Democratic Federal Republic was a multi-national entity established by Armenian, Azerbaijani and Georgian leaders.
  6. ^ Treaty of Batum
  7. ^ Armistice of Mudros
  8. ^ Mountainous Karabakh was placed under the jurisdiction of Azerbaijan until the final delimitation agreement would be reached at the Paris Peace Conference.
  9. ^ Seventh Assembly of Mountainous Karabakh
  10. ^ British withdrawal.
  11. ^ Eighth Assembly of Mountainous Karabakh
  12. ^ General Dro (Drastamat Kanayan) takes parts of Mountainous Karabakh on behalf of the Republic of Armenia.
  13. ^ Ninth Assembly of Mountainous Karabakh
  14. ^ Azerbaijan is invaded by the Red Army.
  15. ^ The final status of Mountainous Karabakh was still being debated.
  16. ^  Azerbaijan SSR's revolutionary committee declares Mountainous Karabakh to be transferred to  Armenian SSR.
  17. ^ Kavbiuro decides to leave Mountainous-Karabakh within  Azerbaijan SSR.
  18. ^ Declared, and then implemented in November of 1924.
  19. ^ Operation Ring
  20. ^ The Armenians of the Nagorno-Karabakh Autonomous Oblast declare their independence.
  21. ^ Azerbaijan abolishes the Nagorno-Karabakh Autonomous Oblast.
  22. ^ Bishkek Protocol ceasefire.

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1912-, Chahin, M., (2001). The kingdom of Armenia : a history (2nd, rev. ed.). Richmond, Surrey: Curzon. p. 107. ISBN 0700714529. OCLC 46908690. This shows that Urartu was very much in existence [...] down to 594 BC, [...]. It is possible that the last king of Urartu's reigh ended at about the same time or a little earlier. [...] in 590 BC, the Medes marched westwards [towards western Anatolia and Lydia].CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  2. ^ Levon., Chorbajian, (1994). The Caucasian knot : the history & geopolitics of Nagorno-Karabagh. Donabédian, Patrick., Mutafian, Claude. London: Atlantic Highlands, NJ. p. 53. ISBN 1856492877. OCLC 31970952. Certain authors estimate that when King Artashes (189–160 BC) brought about the unification of the Kingdom of Great Armenia, Caucasian tribes, probably Albanians, living in Artsakh and Utik were brought in by force. This thesis is said to be based on Strabo, but, in reality, when he describes the conquests Artashes carried out at the expense of the Medes and Iberians – and not the Albanians – he says nothing of Artsakh and Utik, since these provinces were certainly already a part of Armenia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  3. ^ 1912-, Chahin, M., (2001). The kingdom of Armenia : a history (2nd, rev. ed.). Richmond, Surrey: Curzon. p. 212. ISBN 0700714529. OCLC 46908690. The Armenian king, Parthia's ally since the year 53 BC, appeared to submit.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  4. ^ Suny (1994), p. 14.
  5. ^ Theodore Mommsen. The Provinces of the Roman Empire. Chapter IX, p. 68
  6. ^ Hewsen, Robert H. "The Meliks of Eastern Armenia: A Preliminary Study." Revue des Études Arméniennes. NS: IX, 1972, pp. 255-329.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Thomas., De Waal, (2013). Black garden : Armenia and Azerbaijan through peace and war (10th-year anniversary ed., rev. and updated ed.). New York: New York University Press. pp. 329–335. ISBN 9780814770825. OCLC 843880838.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)