Timeline of Boise, Idaho

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Boise, Idaho, United States.

19th century[edit]

  • Pre-colonization - Area inhabited by Boise Valley Shoshone and Bannock Tribes, a part of the "Snake Country"
  • 1811 – Wilson Hunt's expedition in search of Fur trade routes becomes the first White American settler to visit the area[1][2]
  • 1818 – "Joint-Occupation" of the region by the United Kingdom and the United States, in practice the region remained free of Settler incursions and HBC had a monopoly
  • 1846 – British relinquishing of its claim, US takeover and establishment of "Oregon Territory.
  • 1848 – Passage of Donation Land Claim Act Increasing settler incursion en route to the Pacific Coast of Oregon
  • 1854 – Ward Massacre, the killing of 21 settlers in an attack on a 6-wagon caravan.
  • 1863 – Gold mines discovered in the area. Fort Boise established by United States Army.[3][4]
  • 1864 – October 10: Governor of the territory and Boise Valley Shoshone tribe sign a treaty in which the tribe gives up the control of the land upon which Boise is located.[5] Treaty was never ratified by Congress.[6]
  • 1864 – Idaho Tri-Weekly Statesman newspaper begins publication.[7]
Christ Chapel was constructed in 1866 and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.

20th century[edit]

  • 1900 – Population: 5,957.[4]
  • 1901 – Idanha Hotel opens
  • 1902 - Boise High School building replaced. "Not the well-known white brick building present today, but traditional red brick, typical of the time period. The cornerstone was laid in 1902."
  • 1905 – Carnegie Public Library opens [16][17]
  • 1906 – Boise Commercial Club organized [18]
Main Street in 1911
  • 1907 – Julia Davis Park established
  • 1908 – Pinney Theatre opens [19]
  • 1909 – College Women's Club organized [20]
  • 1910 – YWCA organized [20]
    • Population: 17,358.[4]
  • 1912 – Idaho State Capitol opens (first phase)
  • 1913 – Idaho Labor Herald and New Freedom newspapers begin publication.[7]
    • Boise-Payette Lumber Company in business
Map of Boise in 1917
Boise's Carnegie Public Library opened in 1905 on Washington St. and remained at that site until the library moved in 1973.
US Bank Plaza, constructed as "Idaho First Plaza," opened in 1978.

21st century[edit]

Aerial view of Boise in 2007
Butch Otter and Lori Otter, Governor and First Lady of Idaho, open the 2009 Special Olympics World Winter Games

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “Wilson Price Hunt.” American Western Expansion. Accessed May 6, 2022. Link.
  2. ^ “Wilson Price Hunt Expedition Historical Marker.” Historical Marker, October 18, 2020. Link.
  3. ^ Automobile Blue Book 1919.
  4. ^ a b c d e Britannica 1910.
  5. ^ Idaho State Historical Society. “Text of the Treaty of Fort Boise, October 10, 1864.” Link, September 1865.
  6. ^ “CALEB LYON OF LYONSDALE AND THE BOISE CLAIM.” Idaho State Historical Society Reference Series, December 1974. Link.
  7. ^ a b c d "US Newspaper Directory". Chronicling America. Washington DC: Library of Congress. Retrieved March 31, 2013.
  8. ^ John Hailey (1910), The History of Idaho, Boise, Id: Syms-York Company, OCLC 5793481, OL 7093749M
  9. ^ Myers, Daniel. “An Archival Review and Ethnographic Study for the Relicensing of the Hells Canyon Complex Hydroelectrical Plants.” Idaho Power, July 2001. Link.
  10. ^ Michno, Gregory, The Deadliest Indian War in the West: The Snake Conflict, 1864-1868. Caldwell: Caxton Press, 2007. pp 345-346
  11. ^ Murray, Crystl. “Idaho Natives: Shoshone-Bannocks Tribes.” IDAHO NATIVES | SHOSHONE-BANNOCKS TRIBES. Accessed May 9, 2022. Link.
  12. ^ a b "Come and Explore Over a Century of Prison History!". Idaho.gov. Retrieved March 31, 2013.
  13. ^ MADEO. "Feb. 25, 1886 | White Idaho Residents Organize Anti-Chinese Convention". calendar.eji.org. Retrieved 2021-04-26.
  14. ^ Mary Osborn Douthit, ed. (1905). "Women's Club Work in Idaho". The Souvenir of Western Women . Portland, Oregon.
  15. ^ "Collection Descriptions". Idaho State Historical Society. Retrieved March 31, 2013.
  16. ^ "History of Boise's Library". Boise Public Library. Archived from the original on 25 July 2011.
  17. ^ American Library Annual, 1917–1918. New York: R.R. Bowker Co. 1918.
  18. ^ Boise, Boise Commercial Club, 1907
  19. ^ The Billboard, October 3, 1908
  20. ^ a b "Idaho Branch". Journal of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae. Chicago: Association of Collegiate Alumnae. January 1911.
  21. ^ “Large Sales,Pilot Training Upswing Marked by Aviation,” Idaho Statesman, Boise. January 2, 1947. p. 13.
  22. ^ Bottcher, Walter R. (January 26, 1940). "Senator Borah rests in mountain's shadow". Lewiston Morning Tribune. Associated Press. p. 1.
  23. ^ "Building urged". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Associated Press. October 4, 1972. p. 3.
  24. ^ "NCGA Co-ops: Idaho". Iowa: National Cooperative Grocers Association.
  25. ^ "Boise-Co-op".
  26. ^ "Pro ball returns to Boise after absence of 11 years". Lewiston Morning Tribune. June 18, 1975. p. B1.
  27. ^ "Boise drops opener before 1,814 fans". Lewiston Morning Tribune. Associated Press. June 19, 1975. p. B1.
  28. ^ "Historic hospital damaged by fire". Spokesman-Review. Associated Press. November 16, 1976. p. 8.
  29. ^ "Old building to be razed". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Associated Press. November 23, 1976. p. 22.
  30. ^ "Past Plays". Idaho Shakespeare Festival. Retrieved March 31, 2013.
  31. ^ "Idaho bank plans rites". Deseret News. August 1, 1978. p. B3.
  32. ^ "Bank will dedicate new office building". Lewiston Morning Tribune. July 23, 1978. p. 3D.
  33. ^ "Boise board tables 'Buckskins'". Lewiston Morning Tribune. Associated Press. September 14, 1977. p. B3.
  34. ^ "Buckskins continue sans pay". Spokesman-Review. Associated Press. August 22, 1978. p. 15.
  35. ^ "Church's body comes home to Idaho". Spokesman-Review. Associated Press. April 12, 1984. p. 1.
  36. ^ "Hundreds of Idahoans mourn". Spokane Chronicle. Associated Press. April 12, 1984. p. 1.
  37. ^ Stalwick, Howie (June 16, 1987). "Indians open season tonight". Spokesman-Review. p. B1.
  38. ^ "Stubbon fire guts old Boise building". Bend (OR) Bulletin. UPI. January 25, 1987. p. A-6.
  39. ^ "Downtown Boise fire under control". (Moscow) Idahonian. Associated Press. January 26, 1987. p. 5.
  40. ^ Collias, Nicholas (November 23, 2005). "The Hole Truth And Nothing But". Boise Weekly.
  41. ^ "Welcome to the City of Boise". Archived from the original on April 1997 – via Internet Archive, Wayback Machine.
  42. ^ "Cincinnati takes inaugural Humanitarian Bowl". The Item. Sumter, SC. Associated Press. December 30, 1997. p. 3B.
  43. ^ "About Boise". City of Boise. Archived from the original on June 4, 2003.
  44. ^ a b Pluralism Project. "Boise, Idaho". Directory of Religious Centers. Harvard University. Retrieved October 14, 2013.
  45. ^ "Meet the Mayors". Washington, DC: United States Conference of Mayors. Archived from the original on June 27, 2008. Retrieved March 31, 2013.
  46. ^ "Boise Region Grapples With Smog", New York Times, January 23, 2009
  47. ^ "Idaho". CJR's Guide to Online News Startups. New York: Columbia Journalism Review. Retrieved October 19, 2013.
  48. ^ "Dancers Adopt a City and Vice Versa", New York Times, August 13, 2010
  49. ^ "Boise 150". Retrieved March 31, 2013.
  50. ^ “RBVP Proclamation.” Upper Snake River Tribes Foundation, June 8, 2017. Link.

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 43°36′49″N 116°14′16″W / 43.613739°N 116.237651°W / 43.613739; -116.237651