Timeline of Charlotte, North Carolina

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The following is a timeline of the history of Charlotte, North Carolina, United States.

Prior to 19th century[edit]

Part of a series on the
History of North Carolina
Seal of North Carolina
Flag of North Carolina.svg North Carolina portal

19th century[edit]

20th century[edit]

21st century[edit]

2000s[edit]

2010s[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Scholl Center for American History and Culture. "North Carolina: Individual County Chronologies". Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. Chicago: Newberry Library. Retrieved May 30, 2015.
  2. ^ a b Charles Lee Raper (1898), The church and private schools of North Carolina, Greensboro, N.C: J.J.Stone, printer
  3. ^ a b c d e f Tompkins 1903.
  4. ^ a b c d "US Newspaper Directory". Chronicling America. Washington DC: Library of Congress. Retrieved August 28, 2012.
  5. ^ a b c d Maddison 2007.
  6. ^ Stephen Beauregard Weeks (1888), A history of the Young Men's Christian Association movement in North Carolina, 1857–1888, Raleigh, N.C: Observer Printing Company, OCLC 13253321
  7. ^ Biennial Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of North Carolina. 1898
  8. ^ "About The Charlotte Observer". Archived from the original on June 12, 2012. Retrieved August 28, 2012.
  9. ^ "African American newspapers in North Carolina". Research Guides for North Carolina. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Libraries. Retrieved May 30, 2015.
  10. ^ Laws and resolutions of the State of North Carolina. 1891
  11. ^ American College and Private School Directory. 1914
  12. ^ American Library Annual, 1917–1918. New York: R.R. Bowker Co. 1918 – via Hathi Trust.
  13. ^ Walsh 1907.
  14. ^ a b Jack Alicoate, ed. (1939), "Standard Broadcasting Stations of the United States: North Carolina", Radio Annual, New York: Radio Daily, OCLC 2459636
  15. ^ a b c d e f Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in the United States: 1790 to 1990, US Census Bureau, 1998
  16. ^ a b Charles A. Alicoate, ed. (1960), "Television Stations: North Carolina", Radio Annual and Television Year Book, New York: Radio Daily Corp., OCLC 10512206
  17. ^ "Botanical Gardens History and Mission". Archived from the original on May 16, 2012. Retrieved August 28, 2012.
  18. ^ "Garden Search: United States of America: North Carolina". London: Botanic Gardens Conservation International. Retrieved May 30, 2015.
  19. ^ American Association for State and Local History (2002). Directory of Historical Organizations in the United States and Canada. ISBN 0-7591-0002-0.
  20. ^ "Timeline of Our History". Charlotte NC: Gantt Center for African-American Arts+Culture. Retrieved May 30, 2015.
  21. ^ "NII Awards 1995". USA: National Information Infrastructure Awards. Archived from the original on January 1997.
  22. ^ "North Carolina". Official Congressional Directory. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. 1993 – via HathiTrust.
  23. ^ Steve Snow (ed.). "Charlotte's Web". Archived from the original on February 1998.
  24. ^ Patricia A. Langelier (1996). "Local Government Home Pages". Popular Government. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 6 (3): 38+. ISSN 0032-4515. Special Series: Local Government on the Internet
  25. ^ "Charlotte-Mecklenburg Home Page". Archived from the original on December 1998 – via Internet Archive, Wayback Machine.
  26. ^ "By Court Order, Busing Ends Where It Began", New York Times, September 11, 1999
  27. ^ "Featured Guides: City: Charlotte". Eat Well Guide. New York: Grace Communication Foundation. Archived from the original on March 16, 2015. Retrieved May 30, 2015.
  28. ^ Tina Rosenberg (October 9, 2014), "In This World Cup, the Goal is a Better Life", New York Times
  29. ^ "Meet the Mayors". Washington, DC: United States Conference of Mayors. Archived from the original on June 27, 2008. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  30. ^ "North Carolina". Official Congressional Directory. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. 2013.
  31. ^ "The 15 Cities with the Largest Numeric Increase from July 1, 2012 to July 1, 2013" (PDF). US Census Bureau. 2014. Vintage 2013 Population Estimates
  32. ^ Civic Impulse, LLC. "Members of Congress". GovTrack. Washington, D.C. Retrieved September 22, 2016.
  33. ^ Joe Germuska (ed.). "Charlotte, NC". Censusreporter.org. USA. Retrieved May 3, 2017.
  34. ^ "State of emergency declared in US city", BBC News, September 22, 2016

Bibliography[edit]

Published in 19th century
Published in 20th century
Published in 21st century

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 35°13′37″N 80°50′36″W / 35.226944°N 80.843333°W / 35.226944; -80.843333