Timeline of Chicago history

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Chicago, Illinois, United States.

Before the 19th century[edit]

As interpreted from the 1670 translation of the de Soto narrative into French by Pierre Richelet, the Chucagua River, was believed to be the Mississippi. La Salle named Checagou, the transliterated from Spanish, as the gateway to the River of de Soto.
Site of Chicagou on the lake, in Guillaume de L'Isle's map (Paris, 1718)

19th century[edit]

1800s–1840s[edit]

1820 Chicago
1821 Survey of Chicago
Merchants' Hotel on left, looking North from State and Washington Streets, before 1868
Chicago in 1830, as depicted in 1884
Chicago in 1832, as depicted in 1892
Chicago in 1836
1893 Bird's eye view of Chicago
Fort Dearborn depicted as in 1831, sketched 1850s although the accuracy of the sketch was debated soon after it appeared.

1850s–1890s[edit]

The original library, inside the old water tower on the site that is now the Rookery Building.
This former water tower was the site of the original public library, exterior view
Art Institute of Chicago As seen from Michigan Ave
Home Insurance Building
Field Museum in Chicago
  • 1885: Home Insurance Building building was the first skyscraper that stood in Chicago from 1885 to 1931. Originally ten stories and 138 ft (42.1 m) tall, it was designed by William Le Baron Jenney in 1884[15][16] Two floors were added in 1891, bringing its now finished height to 180 feet (54.9 meters). It was the first tall building to be supported both inside and outside by a fireproof structural steel frame, though it also included reinforced concrete. A landmark lost to history and is considered the world's first skyscraper.
Chicago Water Tower and Chicago Avenue Pumping Station, circa 1886
Chicago-Sanitary-and-Ship-Canal, during construction
Map of the business portion of Chicago

20th century[edit]

Construction of the Chicago Drainage Canal, 1900s

1900s–1940s[edit]

All Star Tournament, 18 Inch Balke Line, Chicago, May 7–14, 1906
Jewish men and boys standing on a sidewalk in Chicago, 1903
Theodore Roosevelt in Chicago, 1915
During construction, 1915 (Chicago Daily News)

1950s–1990s[edit]

21st century[edit]

2000s–Present[edit]

In 2009, an Amtrak Lake Shore Limited train backing into Chicago Union Station
Chicago Theater in 2011
Navy Pier in 2017
14th Street Coach Yard and Willis Tower, October 2018

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]