Timeline of Fresno, California

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Fresno, California, USA.

19th century[edit]

  • 1872 – Founded by the Central Pacific Railroad Company [1]
  • 1874 – Fresno becomes seat of Fresno County.[2]
  • 1875
    • Fresno County Courthouse built.
    • Fresno Expositor newspaper in publication.[3]
    • Central California Colony established south of Fresno, creating a successful model for attracting settlers. [1] [4]
  • 1876 – Fresno Morning Republican newspaper in publication.[5]
  • 1877 – Fresno Volunteer Fire Department organized.[6]
  • 1882 – St. John Church built.
  • 1884 – Big Fresno Fair begins.[1]
  • 1885 – Fresno incorporated.[7]
  • 1889 – Meux Home built.[8]
  • 1890
    • Barton opera house opens.[7]
    • Population exceeds 10,000.[1]
  • 1892 - Street cars introduced [1]
  • 1893 – Fresno Free Public Library opens. [2]
  • 1894
  • 1899 – Santa Fe Passenger Depot opens.
  • 1900 – Population: 12,470.[11]

20th century[edit]

1900s–1940s[edit]

1950s–1990s[edit]

21st century[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d ["History of Fresno". City of Fresno. Retrieved 3 August 2016. ]
  2. ^ a b Nergal 1980.
  3. ^ a b c d "US Newspaper Directory". Chronicling America. Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  4. ^ Panter, John. "Central California Colony: Marvel of the Desert" (PDF). The Journal of the Fresno City and County Historical Society. Retrieved 3 August 2016. 
  5. ^ "The Fresno Republican Newspaper". The Fresno Republican. Retrieved 3 August 2016. 
  6. ^ a b Fresno Historical Society. "Collections: Manuscripts". Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  7. ^ a b c Vandor 1919.
  8. ^ "Thomas R. Meux Home (1889)". Local Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 3 August 2016. 
  9. ^ California Federation of Women's Clubs (1907). Club Women of California. San Francisco. 
  10. ^ Jeroen Heijmans; Bill Mallon (2011). "Chronology". Historical Dictionary of Cycling. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 978-0-8108-7175-5. 
  11. ^ a b c Federal Writers' Project 1939.
  12. ^ a b Pluralism Project. "Fresno, California". Directory of Religious Centers. Harvard University. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  13. ^ a b c "Fresno State Centennial" (Historical Timeline). California State University, Fresno. 2010. Archived from the original on March 14, 2014. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  14. ^ "Raisin Day Excitement at Fresno". Pacific Rural Press. April 24, 1920 – via California Digital Newspaper Collection. 
  15. ^ Project for Excellence in Journalism (2012). "McClatchy Company". Media Ownership Database. State of the News Media. Washington, D.C.: Pew Research Center. 
  16. ^ Madden Library. "Local History". Research Guides. California State University, Fresno. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  17. ^ a b c Mike Tigas and Sisi Wei (ed.). "Fresno, California". Nonprofit Explorer. New York: ProPublica. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  18. ^ "California". Official Congressional Directory. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. 1958. 
  19. ^ Cordelia Candelaria, ed. (2004). Encyclopedia of Latino Popular Culture. Greenwood Publishing Group. ISBN 978-0-313-33210-4. 
  20. ^ Marshall Ganz (2010). Why David Sometimes Wins: Leadership, Organization, and Strategy in the California Farm Worker Movement. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-975785-5. 
  21. ^ a b "Movie Theaters in Fresno, CA". CinemaTreasures.org. Los Angeles: Cinema Treasures LLC. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  22. ^ "American Association of Community Theatre". Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  23. ^ American Association for State and Local History (2002). "California: Fresno". Directory of Historical Organizations in the United States and Canada (15th ed.). p. 64. ISBN 0759100020. 
  24. ^ Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in the United States: 1790 to 1990, US Census Bureau, 1998 
  25. ^ "California Food Banks". Food Bank Locator. Chicago: Feeding America. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  26. ^ "City Hall Gets Web Site", Fresno Bee, May 10, 1998 – via Fresno County Public Library 
  27. ^ "City of Fresno". Archived from the original on February 2000 – via Internet Archive, Wayback Machine. 
  28. ^ Civic Impulse, LLC. "Members of Congress". GovTrack. Washington, D.C. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  29. ^ "(Fresno)". Northern California Community Loan Fund. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  30. ^ "Death of a Museum". The New York Times. July 23, 2013. 
  31. ^ "Fresno (city), California". State & County QuickFacts. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 27, 2012. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  32. ^ Norimitsu Onishi (May 7, 2013). "Recognition Grows for Poets of Streets, Main or Otherwise". The New York Times. 
  33. ^ Federal Writers' Project (1939), "Chronology", California: Guide to the Golden State, American Guide Series, New York: Hastings House – via Open Library 

Bibliography[edit]

Published in the 19th century
Published in the 20th century
Published in the 21st century

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 36°45′00″N 119°46′00″W / 36.75°N 119.766667°W / 36.75; -119.766667