Timeline of Gloucester, Massachusetts

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This is a timeline of the history of the city of Gloucester, Massachusetts, USA.

Prior to 19th century[edit]

19th century[edit]

1800s-1850s[edit]

First Universalist Church built on Middle Street, 1806 (photo 1930s)
George Henry Procter
Francis Procter
Procter Bros., publishers, est. 1857
  • 1801 - Annisquam Harbor Light erected.[4]
  • 1805 - Daily Boston-Gloucester stagecoach begins operating.[4]
  • 1806 - First Universalist Church built.[8]
  • 1808 - First Baptist Church founded.[4]
  • 1819 - Nearby Essex incorporated as a town.[9]
  • 1821 - Ten Pound Island Light erected.[4]
  • 1827 - Gloucester Telegraph newspaper begins publication.[1]
  • 1828 - First Parish Church built on Middle Street.[8]
  • 1830
  • 1831 - Eastern Point Light erected.[4]
  • 1832 - Gloucester Circulating Library, Front Street, in operation.[11]
  • 1834 - Gloucester Democrat newspaper begins publication.[1]
  • 1835 - Straitsmouth Island Light erected.[4]
  • 1836 - Female Charitable Society organized.[3]
  • 1838
    • Methodist Church built.[4]
    • Congregationalist Ladies' Sewing Circle organized.[3]
  • 1839 - Annisquam Universalist Ladies' Sewing Circle organized.[3]
  • 1840
    • Part of Gloucester becomes the new town of Rockport.[4]
    • Population: 6,350.[7]
  • 1842 - Lane's Cove Pier Co. formed.[3]
  • 1843 - Cape Ann Light newspaper begins publication.[1]
  • 1844 - Town Hall built.[4]
  • 1845 - Odd Fellows Ocean Lodge established.[6]
  • 1847
    • Railway begins operating.[4]
    • Gloucester Mutual Fishing Insurance Co., Gloucester Marine Insurance Co., and Annisquam Mutual Fire Insurance Co. incorporated.[3]
    • Artist Fitz Hugh Lane moves to town.[12]
  • 1848
    • Gloucester News newspaper begins publication.[1]
    • Mount Adnah Cemetery organized.[3]
  • 1849 - Fitz Henry Lane house and Pavilion Hotel[8] built.
  • 1850
    • Burnham Brothers Marine Railway built.[8]
    • Population: 7,786.[7]
  • 1851 - Cape Ann Savings Bank incorporated.[3]
  • 1852 - Company G., 8th Regiment organized.[3]
  • 1853 - Gloucester Gas Light Company in business.[13]
  • 1855
  • 1856
    • Oak Grove Cemetery, Independent Sons of Temperance,[3] and Cape Ann Bank[1] established.
    • Cape Ann Advertiser newspaper begins publication.[1]
  • 1857
    • Procter Brothers in business.[14]
    • Citizens' Library Association organized.[3]
  • 1858
    • Police court, Cape Ann Telegraph Co., Congregationalist Young Ladies' Society, and Congregationalist Ladies' Society at the Cove established.[3]
    • East Gloucester Baptist Church built.[4]
  • 1859
    • Gloucester Fishermen's Widow's and Orphan's Fund Society; Sons of Temperance, Annisquam Division; Franklin Club; Congregationalist Ladies' Home Missionary Society; and Band of Hope organized.[3]
    • November 2: "Mechanic Engine Co. had a grand parade."[3]

1860s-1890s[edit]

Civil war recruitment poster, ca.1861
Universalist Centenary camp ground, 1870
Seal of City of Gloucester, incorporated 1873
Advertisements for Gloucester businesses, 1882
  • 1860 - Population: 10,904.[7]
  • 1861 - Railway to Rockport begins operating.[4]
  • 1862 - Shute & Merchant in business |url=http://www.shuteandmerchant.com/history-2.html |
  • 1864
    • February 18: Fire.[10]
    • First National Bank in business.[1]
  • 1865 - Freemason Acacia Lodge established.[6]
  • 1866
    • Board of Trade[4] and Cape Ann Horticultural Society[6] established.
    • Cape Ann Anchor & Forge in business.[4]
  • 1867
    • North Gloucester Universalist church active.[4]
    • Sylvanus Smith & Co. in business.[14]
  • 1869
    • May 16: Town Hall burns down.[1]
    • Cape Ann Granite quarry in business.[4]
  • 1870
  • 1871 - Gloucester City Hall built.
  • 1872 - Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Library incorporated.[16][17]
  • 1873
    • Gloucester becomes a city.[1]
    • Lanesville Granite quarry in business.[4]
    • YMCA[4] and Cape Ann Scientific and Literary Association[18] founded.
  • 1874
    • Slade Gorton & Company established.
    • Robert R. Fears becomes first city mayor.
    • Procter Brothers circulating library opens.[19]
  • 1877
  • 1880
    • Sea Side Library in operation.[20]
    • Population: 19,329.[4]
  • 1881
    • Gloucester Water Supply Co. incorporated.[1]
    • Harbor Methodist Church built.[4]
    • Gloucester Isinglass and Glue in business.[13]
  • 1882 - Russia Cement Co. in business.[4]
  • 1884
    • Gloucester News and Cape Ann Breeze newspapers begin publication.[1]
    • Tarr and Wonson paint factory built.
    • Magonolia Library Association formed.
  • 1885
    • October 16: North Shore Tricycle Run arrives in Gloucester.[21]
    • Horse-drawn Gloucester Street Railway begins operating.[4][13]
  • 1887 - Magnolia Congregational Church[4] and Gloucester Co-operative Bank[1] established.
  • 1888
    • Gloucester Daily Times newspaper begins publication.[1]
    • Gloucester Electric Co. in business.[4][13]
  • 1891
    • Gloucester Safe Deposit and Trust in business.[13]
    • Hawthorne Inn built.[9]
  • 1892
    • 250th anniversary of incorporation of town of Gloucester.[22]
    • Gloucester Towboat Co. in business.[13]
  • 1895
  • 1896 - Eliot house (residence) built.[23]
  • 1897 - Addison Gilbert Hospital built.
  • 1898
  • 1899 - Ravenswood Park established.
  • 1900 - Population: 26,121.[4]

20th century[edit]

S.S. Cape Ann ferry, 1905
Gloucester, Massachusetts, 2010

21st century[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Pringle 1892.
  2. ^ Alden Bradford (1843). New England Chronology. Boston: S.G. Simpkins.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Gloucester Directory 1860.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao Arrington 1922.
  5. ^ James Robinson Newhall (1836), The Essex Memorial, for 1836: embracing a register of the county, Salem, Mass.: Henry Whipple
  6. ^ a b c d Fisheries 1876.
  7. ^ a b c d e f Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in the United States: 1790 to 1990, US Census Bureau, 1998
  8. ^ a b c d "Historical Materials". Fitz Henry Lane Online. Gloucester: Cape Ann Museum. Retrieved March 30, 2016.
  9. ^ a b "History of the Region (timeline)". Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved March 30, 2016.
  10. ^ a b Fire Department 1892.
  11. ^ Catalogue of the Gloucester Circulating Library. Gloucester Telegraph. January 28, 1832.
  12. ^ a b Weinberg 1994.
  13. ^ a b c d e f Report of the Tax Commissioner of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 1899.
  14. ^ a b William Richard Cutter (1908). Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts. Lewis Historical Publishing Company.
  15. ^ "Universalist Centenary: A City of Tents", New York Times, September 23, 1870
  16. ^ "Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Library Public library". Archived from the original on November 15, 2011. Retrieved October 24, 2011.
  17. ^ Gloucester Lyceum and Sawyer Free Library, Inc.: 1830-1930, the record of a century, c. 1930
  18. ^ "Cape Ann Museum". Retrieved October 31, 2011.
  19. ^ Cape Ann Advertiser, Sep 11, 1874
  20. ^ Cape Ann Advertiser, Dec 3, 1880
  21. ^ Robert L. McCullough (September 2015), "In 1885, adventurous Boston women took to their tricycles", Boston Globe
  22. ^ Souvenir 1892.
  23. ^ "T.S. Eliot's old summer home may become writers' retreat", Boston Globe, March 31, 2015
  24. ^ a b "Mass Moments". Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities. Retrieved March 30, 2016. (timeline of Massachusetts history)
  25. ^ "Gloucester HarborWalk". Retrieved March 30, 2016.
  26. ^ American Art Annual, Washington DC: American Federation of Arts, 1922
  27. ^ "Gloucester Stage Co". Archived from the original on November 22, 2011. Retrieved November 1, 2011.
  28. ^ "Gloucester Home Page". Archived from the original on December 1998 – via Internet Archive, Wayback Machine.
  29. ^ "Gloucester city, Massachusetts". State & County QuickFacts. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved March 30, 2016.
  30. ^ "Massachusetts Chief's Tack in Drug War: Steer Addicts to Rehab, Not Jail", New York Times, January 24, 2016
  31. ^ Civic Impulse, LLC. "Members of Congress". GovTrack. Washington, D.C. Retrieved March 30, 2016.
  32. ^ Federal Writers' Project 1937: "Chronology"

Bibliography[edit]

published in the 18th-19th century
published in the 20th-21st century

External links[edit]