Timeline of Holguín

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Holguín, Cuba.

Prior to 20th century[edit]

Part of a series on the
History of Cuba
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Governorate of Cuba (1511–1519)
Viceroyalty of New Spain (1535–1821)
Captaincy General of Cuba (1607–1898)

US Military Government (1898–1902)
Republic of Cuba (1902–1959)

Republic of Cuba (1959–)

Timeline
Topical
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  • 1720
    • Settlement established (approximate date).[1]
    • Plaza de Armas (square) laid out.[2]
  • 1751 - Holguin becomes a city.[1]
  • 1752 - Jurisdicción de Holguín established.[citation needed]
  • 1760 - Hospital de San Juan de Dios built.[3]
  • 1809 - San Jose Church built.[3]
  • 1820 - San Isidore Church built.
  • 1868
  • 1872 - December 19: City taken by Cuban forces.[4][5]
  • 1893 - Railway begins operating between port of Gibara and Holguin.[6]
  • 1895 - El Eco de Holguin newspaper begins publication.[7]
  • 1899 - Population: 6,054 city; 34,506 district; 327,715 province.[8]

20th century[edit]

21st century[edit]

  • 2003 - Drought.[18]
  • 2004 - Construction of Parque de Los Tiempos (park) begins.[19]
  • 2014 - Population: 291,560.[20]
  • 2015 - September: Catholic pope visits Holguin.[21]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Britannica 1910.
  2. ^ a b c "EcuRed" (in Spanish). Cuba. Retrieved September 28, 2016.
  3. ^ a b De La Pezuela 1871.
  4. ^ a b c "Holguin". Rough Guide to Cuba (4th ed.). 2007. ISBN 978-1-84353-811-0.
  5. ^ "Cuba: Regulars All Sent to Holguin", New York Times, January 3, 1873
  6. ^ Vega Suñol 2003.
  7. ^ "Cuba: Holguin", American Newspaper Annual, Philadelphia: N.W. Ayer & Son, 1902
  8. ^ War Department (1900). Census of Cuba, 1899. Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  9. ^ Victor H. Olmsted; Henry Gannett, eds. (1909). Cuba: Population, History and Resources 1907. Washington DC: United States Bureau of the Census.
  10. ^ Holguin, Cuba, Lonely Planet, retrieved September 28, 2016
  11. ^ Alfonso González (1971). "Population of Cuba". Caribbean Studies. University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus. 11. JSTOR 25612382.
  12. ^ United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Statistical Office (1976). "Population of capital city and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 1975. New York. pp. 253–279.
  13. ^ International Association of Universities (1992). "Cuba". World List of Universities (19th ed.). Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 150–152. ISBN 978-1-349-12037-6.
  14. ^ "Chronology of Catholic Dioceses: Cuba". Norway: Roman Catholic Diocese of Oslo. Retrieved September 28, 2016.
  15. ^ Bonavía 2003.
  16. ^ Roberto Valcárcel Rojas and César A. Rodríguez Arce (2005). "El Chorro de Maíta". In L. Antonio Curet (ed.). Dialogues in Cuban Archaeology. University of Alabama Press. ISBN 978-0-8173-5187-8.
  17. ^ South America, Central America and the Caribbean 2002. Regional Surveys of the World. Europa Publications. 2001. ISBN 978-1-85743-121-6.
  18. ^ Associated Press (August 8, 2004), "Drought Brings Hardship and Withered Crops to Eastern Cuba", New York Times
  19. ^ "Holguín renace en sus parques", Ahora (in Spanish), Holguin, March 29, 2015
  20. ^ "Population of Capital Cities and Cities of 100,000 or More Inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 2014. United Nations Statistics Division.
  21. ^ "Pope Francis holds mass for 100,000 people in Holguín, Cuba", The Guardian, September 21, 2015

This article incorporates information from the Spanish Wikipedia.

Bibliography[edit]

in English
in Spanish

External links[edit]