Timeline of Johannesburg

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Johannesburg, in the Gauteng province of South Africa.

19th century[edit]

20th century[edit]

1900s-1950s[edit]

1960s-1990s[edit]

21st century[edit]

Aerial view of Johannesburg, 2006

2000s[edit]

2010s[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Webster's Geographical Dictionary, US: G. & C. Merriam Co., 1960, OL 5812502M 
  2. ^ a b H.T. Montague Bell; C. Arthur Lane (1905). Guide to the Transvaal. Johannesburg Reception Committee. 
  3. ^ "Johannesburg (South Africa) Newspapers". WorldCat. US: Online Computer Library Center. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Britannica 1910.
  5. ^ "South Africa". International Encyclopedia of the Stock Market. Fitzroy Dearborn. 1999. p. 964. ISBN 978-1-884964-35-0. 
  6. ^ a b Jaques Malan (2005). "Opera Houses in South Africa". In Christine Lucia. World of South African Music: A Reader. Cambridge Scholars Press. p. 126. ISBN 978-1-904303-36-7. 
  7. ^ a b R.F. Kennedy (1968). "Johannesburg Public Library". Journal of Library History. 3. 
  8. ^ Rough Guide 2012.
  9. ^ a b Schmitz 2004.
  10. ^ Murchú 2007.
  11. ^ Christine Lucia, ed. (2005). World of South African Music: A Reader. Cambridge Scholars Press. ISBN 978-1-904303-36-7. 
  12. ^ "Lexicon - Empire Exhibition". Retrieved December 5, 2013. 
  13. ^ Les Switzer, ed. (1997). South Africa's Alternative Press: Voices of Protest and Resistance, 1880-1960. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-55351-3. 
  14. ^ a b "Population of capital city and cities of 100,000 or more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 1955. New York: Statistical Office of the United Nations. 
  15. ^ a b c d e "Southern Africa, 1900 A.D.–present: Key Events". Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art. Retrieved 30 August 2015. 
  16. ^ Lionel Abrahams (1980). "Purple Renoster: An Adolescence". English in Africa. 7. JSTOR 40238472. 
  17. ^ "Global Nonviolent Action Database". Pennsylvania, US: Swarthmore College. Retrieved 30 September 2014. 
  18. ^ Jacqueline Audrey Kalley; et al. (1999). Southern African Political History: A Chronology of Key Political Events from Independence to Mid-1997. Greenwood Publishing Group. ISBN 978-0-313-30247-3. 
  19. ^ United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Statistical Office (1976). "Population of capital city and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 1975. New York. pp. 253–279. 
  20. ^ "Demolition dreams: the world's 'worst' buildings", Financial Times, 31 October 2014 
  21. ^ Kruger 2001.
  22. ^ a b "Afrapix timeline 1978 - 1991". South African History Online. Retrieved 30 August 2015. 
  23. ^ Barchiesi 2007.
  24. ^ a b United Nations Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis, Statistics Division (1997). "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". 1995 Demographic Yearbook. New York. pp. 262–321. 
  25. ^ a b c "Organizations". International Relations and Security Network. Switzerland: Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich. Retrieved 30 September 2014. 
  26. ^ "South Africa". Africa South of the Sahara 2003. Regional Surveys of the World. Europa Publications. 2003. ISSN 0065-3896. 
  27. ^ "Introduction". Centre for Policy Studies. Retrieved 30 September 2014. 
  28. ^ Roger B. Beck (2013). "Timeline of Historical Events". History of South Africa. Greenwood Histories of Modern Nations (2nd ed.). ABC-CLIO. ISBN 978-1-61069-527-5. 
  29. ^ "Think Tank Directory". Philadelphia: Foreign Policy Research Institute. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  30. ^ "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 or more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 2011. United Nations Statistics Division. 2012. 
  31. ^ "Joburg.org.za". City of Johannesburg. Archived from the original on 12 December 1998 – via Wayback Machine. 
  32. ^ Michaela Alejandra Oberhofer (2012), "Fashioning African Cities: The Case of Johannesburg, Lagos and Douala", Streetnotes (20), ISSN 2159-2926 – via California Digital Library  Free to read
  33. ^ a b "The State of African Cities 2014". United Nations Human Settlements Programme. ISBN 978-92-1-132598-0. 
  34. ^ "Mayor". City of Johannesburg. Archived from the original on 12 April 2010. 
  35. ^ a b "Statistics by Place: City of Johannesburg". Statistics South Africa. Retrieved 30 September 2014. 
  36. ^ "Google Africa Blog". July 2008 – via Blogspot. 
  37. ^ "Company: Locations". Google Inc. Archived from the original on 15 August 2013. 
  38. ^ "South African mayors". City Mayors.com. London: City Mayors Foundation. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  39. ^ World Health Organization (2016), Global Urban Ambient Air Pollution Database, Geneva 
  40. ^ "South African students continue fees protest", BBC News, 26 October 2015 

Bibliography[edit]

Published in 20th century[edit]

  • A. Samler Brown; G. Gordon Brown, eds. (1906), "Johannesburg", Guide to South Africa (14th ed.), London: Sampson Low, Marston & Company 
  • "Johannesburg", Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.), New York, 1910, OCLC 14782424 – via Internet Archive 
  • G.-M Van der Waal (1987), From mining camp to metropolis: the buildings of Johannesburg, 1886–1940, Pretoria: C. van Rensburg Publications for the Human Sciences Research Council, ISBN 0868460494 
  • Noelle Watson, ed. (1996). "Johannesburg". International Dictionary of Historic Places: Middle East and Africa. UK: Routledge. ISBN 1884964036. 
  • Musiker, 2000. A Concise Historical Dictionary of Greater Johannesburg, Francolin Pubs., Cape Town, South Africa.

Published in 21st century[edit]

2000s
2010s

External links[edit]