Timeline of LGBT history in Alberta

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This is a timeline of LGBT history in Alberta in Canada.It divides the province into five areas: Northern Alberta, Edmonton, Central Alberta, Calgary and Southern Alberta.

1990s[edit]

1994[edit]

Northern

Edmonton

Central

Calgary

  • Fourth annual Calgary Pride Parade
  • Alberta Rockies Gay Rodeo Association (ARGRA) held its first Canadian Rockies International Rodeo[7]

Southern

1995[edit]

Northern

Edmonton

Central

Calgary

  • Fifth annual Calgary Pride Parade
  • Richard Gregory, member of the Calgary Lesbian and Gay Political Action Guild (CLAGPAG), AIDS Calgary board member and volunteer, chair of the advisory committee to the social services programme at Mount Royal College, was a candidate to become Ward 8 alderman. Gregory became the first out candidate in Calgary city council history.
  • Daniel MacGregor and James Cooke founded queer swim group Different Strokes[9]
  • Gay and Lesbian film fest received 4 000$ from government, attacked in press by Christian groups
  • May 28: birth of Canadian Olympic luger John Fennell, who competed for Team Canada at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia.[10]

Southern

1996[edit]

Northern

Edmonton

  • Government of Alberta won its appeal of the Vriend v Alberta decision in the Court of Appeals, Vriend appealed to the Supreme Court

Central

Calgary

  • Calgary gay bar The Backlot opened by Ken Schultz and partners Rudy and Lorne

Southern

1997[edit]

Northern

Edmonton

Central

Calgary

  • Outlooks Magazine founded (open until 2012)
  • Christian evangelical groups pressure the chief superintendent of the Calgary Board of Education (public school board) to ban two books from school libraries for being “pro-gay”

Southern

1998[edit]

Northern

Edmonton

Central

Calgary

  • The Calgary Police Service established the Gay & Lesbian Community/Police Liaison Committee and appointed a community liaison officer.[11] The first liaison officer was Constable Doug Jones.[12]

Southern

1999[edit]

Northern

Edmonton

Central

Calgary

Southern

2000s[edit]

2000[edit]

Northern

Edmonton

Central

  • Red Deer: Students and staff at Lindsay Thurber Comprehensive High School founded the first gay-straight alliance (GSA) in Alberta[16][17][18]


Calgary

Southern

2001[edit]

Northern

Edmonton

Central

Calgary

Southern

2002[edit]

Northern

Edmonton

  • More than 2 000 people attended the Edmonton Pride Parade

Central

Calgary

  • December 12: Calgary Police Service officers raided Goliath’s Sauna and Texas Lounge (a gay bathhouse and the attached bar) for the first time after allegations of drug sales and live sex shows, and arrested fifteen men, thirteen for being “found in a common bawdy house without a lawful excuse” (an arcane term used in Canadian law to refer to brothels)[1] and two employees for “keeping a common bawdy house.”[20][21] The raid took place after two months of an undercover police investigation.[12] Neither the Calgary Gay & Lesbian Community/Police Liaison Committee nor the community liaison officer Constable Doug Jones were consulted before the raid took place.[12]
  • December 19: Chief of police Jack Beaton refused to attend an emergency meeting of the Calgary Gay & Lesbian Community/Police Liaison Committee to discuss the raid.[12]
  • December 20: 17 charges related to keeping a common bawdy house and being found in a common bawdy house were laid against fifteen men[21][22]

Southern

2003[edit]

Northern

Edmonton

  • May 22: The Edmonton Pride Week Society was incorporated.
  • June: Mayor Bill Smith refused to declare Gay Pride Week, was threatened with a human rights complaint, then granted a declaration[23][1]
  • June 15: estimated 6 000 people attended Edmonton Pride Parade
  • First Acts of Pride event, showcasing drag and queer music, cabaret, and theatre at the Cité Francophone started by Edmonton Pride board director Troy Funk[24]

Central

Calgary

  • January 23: Goliath’s Sauna reopened for the first time after the police raid
  • June: Mayor Dave Bronconnier declared Gay Pride Week
  • July: Priape, a gay store and sex shop, opened its Calgary location on 17 Ave SW[25]
  • November: GayCalgary Magazine started publishing

Southern

2004[edit]

Northern

Edmonton

Central

Calgary

Southern

2005[edit]

Northern

Edmonton

Central

Calgary

Southern

2006[edit]

Northern

Edmonton

Central

Calgary

Southern

2007[edit]

Northern

Edmonton

Central

Calgary

Southern

  • Lethbridge: Lethbridge Pride Festival Society founded, first Lethbridge Pride Festival

2008[edit]

Northern

  • St. Albert
    • October: Greater St. Albert Catholic School District removed substitute teacher Jan Buterman from its roster of substitutes after working for six months when he told them he was a trans person, "in the process of transitioning from female to male." The school board sent him a letter saying that being transgender is "contrary to Catholic teaching" to explain its decision.[30]

Edmonton

Central

Calgary

Southern

2009[edit]

Northern

  • St. Albert
    • October: Jan Buterman, supported by the Alberta Teachers' Association, filed a complaint with the Alberta Human Rights Commission in Edmonton against the Greater St. Albert Catholic School District for dismissing him for telling them he was transgender.[30]

Edmonton

  • April: The Government of Alberta Ministry of Health, under Minister of Health, Ron Liepert, de-listed public health insurance funding for gender affirming surgeries for transgender Albertans.[31][32]
  • June 2: Bill 44 (Human Rights, Citizenship and Multiculturalism Amendment Act, 2009) passed in the Alberta Legislative Assembly, which added sexual orientation to protected grounds in the Alberta Human Rights Act and required school boards to provide written notice to parents of discussions of religion, sex, and sexual orientation
  • June 10: The Trans Equality Society of Alberta (TESA) formed in response to delisting of gender affirming surgeries by the Alberta government.[33]
  • June: Pride Parade

Central

Calgary

Southern

2010s[edit]

2010[edit]

Northern

  • Jasper
    • February: first Pride Weekend[34]
  • Peace River: first-ever Gay Pride Walk north of Edmonton[35]

Edmonton

Central

  • Red Deer: Business owner and out gay man Paul Harris was elected to council, became the first out elected official in Red Deer and first in Alberta outside of Edmonton

Calgary

  • Calgary Dyke March founded[36]

Southern

2011[edit]

Northern

  • Peace River
    • June: First annual Pride Parade, attended by Mayor Lorne Mann[37]

Edmonton

  • May 16: The Edmonton Pride Week Society changed its name to the Edmonton Pride Festival Society[38]
  • Estimated 20 000 people attended Edmonton Pride Parade[39]

Central

Calgary

  • September:
    • Calgary mayor Naheed Nenshi marched as the Grand Marshal of the Calgary Pride Parade, became the first mayor to participate
    • Estimated 15 000 people attended Calgary Pride Parade
    • National Hockey League (NHL) team Calgary Flames sponsored a float for the first time

Southern

  • Lethbridge
    • Lethbridge Pride Fest Society incorporated[40]

2012[edit]

Northern

Edmonton

  • June:
    • Premier Alison Redford became the first premier to walk in the Edmonton Pride Parade and address the Pride Festival
    • Estimated 25 000 people attended Edmonton Pride Parade
  • June: The Government of Alberta Ministry of Health under Minister of Health, Fred Horne, modernized the language used in billing codes to remove homosexuality as a mental disorder. The province used the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases from 1975 (ICD-9) which included homosexuality as a mental disorder. “The old version did say (homosexuality) was a mental disorder, so patients who were seeking treatment for whatever reason … were being classified as having a mental disorder,” Health Minister Fred Horne said, noting the change came into effect at the end of May."[41]

Central

  • Red Deer: Central Alberta Pride Society founded

Calgary

  • Outlooks Magazine closed after fifteen years of publishing Canadian queer content
  • September: Premier Redford became the first premier to walk in the Calgary Pride Parade and address the Pride Festival
  • Marc Power ran for the provincial NDP in Calgary-Klein, came fourth

Southern

  • Medicine Hat: September: Medicine Hat Pride Association held its first Pride celebrations[45]

2013[edit]

Northern

  • Cold Lake
    • First-ever Lakeland Pride celebrations[46]
  • Grande Prairie
    • November 8-10: first annual Gay Pride Weekend, organized by the Gay and Lesbian Association of the Peace (GALAP), consisting of an opening ceremony at the Grande Prairie Regional College, a Gender Bender party, yoga class, pool party and potluck dinner[47]
  • Fort McMurray
    • July 27: local group LGBTQmunity organized the city's first pride event, Pride @ the Pub at Bailey's Pub. Two flags were stolen from the even and found burnt in a parking lot close to the pub which led to an RCMP investigation[48]

Edmonton

  • March 13-22: The Institute for Sexual Minority Studies and Services and University of Alberta LGBTQ student group OUTreach organized the University's first Pride Week[49]
  • June: estimated 35 000 people attended Edmonton Pride Parade
  • June 7: CFB Edmonton raised the pride flag becoming the first forces base in North America to fly it. Master Warrant Officer John McDougall requested that the base fly it during Edmonton Pride Week and the request was granted.[50][51]

Central

  • Red Deer: Councillor Paul Harris re-elected to a second term on council
  • Banff: September: First Banff Pride celebrations[52]

Calgary

  • March: Constable Andy Buck, liaison to the LGBT Community for the Calgary Police Service, began a monthly column in GayCalgary Magazine[53]
  • September: Calgary native Anastasia Bucsis, an Olympic speedskater came out as lesbian on September 1 on Twitter during Calgary Pride, ahead of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. She criticized the anti-gay propaganda law Russian President Vladimir Putin signed in June 2014 banning the promotion of "non-traditional relationships." [54] [55] [56][57][58] [59]On September 18 she announced she had joined Athletes Ally, an organization that promotes "respect for all individuals involved in sports regardless of their sexual orientation."[60]
  • November-December: Priape closed its Calgary location, along with its other brick-and-mortar stores in Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver.[61][62]

Southern

2014[edit]

Northern

  • St. Albert: February: In solidarity with Russian queer people during the Sochi Olympics, the town council decided to raise a rainbow flag at St. Albert Place for the duration of the Olympic Games[63]

Edmonton

  • April 22: A decision was made in C.F. v. Alberta (Vital Statistics), 2014 by Justice B.R. Burrows. In this case, a trans woman, C.F., contested the Alberta Vital Statistics Act requirement of genital surgery for a gender marker change on an Alberta birth certificate. Burrows found that C.F.'s rights had ultimately been infringed upon by the requirement, which he found to be inconsistent with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms on the basis of sex.[64]

Central

Calgary

Southern

  • Lethbridge
    • February: Lethbridge City Hall raised the rainbow flag in solidarity with Russian queer people during the Sochi Olympics[70]

2015[edit]

Northern

  • Grande Prairie
    • October: Grande Prairie Pride Society founded[71]
  • Sherwood Park: Estefania Cortes-Vargas of the Alberta NDP elected to represent Strathcona-Sherwood Park, became first out nonbinary person elected to the Alberta Legislative Assembly and one of the first three openly LGBTQ2+ MLAs
  • Lakeland
    • July: More than 400 people attended the first annual Lakeland Pride[72]
  • St. Albert
    • First annual Pride barbecue[73]

Edmonton

Central

  • Red Deer: Councillor Paul Harris ran for the federal NDP as the candidate in Red Deer-Mountain View, came third
  • Sylvan Lake
    • August: Central Alberta Pride held its first Pride at the Beach event[80]

Calgary

  • University of Ottawa student Michael Connolly of the Alberta NDP elected to represent Calgary-Hawkwood, became one of the first two out gay men elected to the Alberta Legislative Assembly and one of first three openly LGBTQ2+ MLAs[81][82]
  • Flight attendant Ricardo Miranda of the Alberta NDP elected to represent Calgary-Cross, became one of the first two out gay men elected to the Alberta Legislative Assembly[82][83][84]
  • David Khan ran for the Alberta Liberal Party in Calgary-Buffalo, came third behind future Alberta Justice Minister and Minister of Aboriginal Affairs Kathleen Ganley and Progressive Conservative candidate Terry Rock[85]
  • September 5: Trans Pride Flag raised at the Calgary Municipal Building for the first time, which also marked the first time the flag was raised officially by any government body in Alberta. The event was arranged, and flag provided by local trans activist, Aria (Ehren) Burrell, with support from the Trans Equality Society of Alberta (TESA). The date was coordinated to be the same as that of the 2015 Calgary Dyke & Trans March.[86][87][88]
  • September 6: Brian Burke, Calgary Flames president of hockey operations, served as grand marshal of the Pride Parade[89]

Southern

2016[edit]

Northern

  • Hinton
    • June 15: Kara Lazorek and her group The Rose Garden - Hinton Pride organized the first Pride event in Hinton, a social and fundraising barbecue[90]

Edmonton

  • January: Minister of Education, David Eggen, released a document of guidelines for implementation of LGBTQ2+ supportive policy in Alberta's K-12 schools. The document outlines suggested best practices under Alberta law and was written in consultation with community stakeholders, professionals, and other provincial governments. Some of the matters it discusses include affirming the names and gender pronouns of trans and non-conforming children, ensuring access to correct gendered facilities and sports teams for trans children and youth, efforts to thwart bullying, and establishment of Gay-Straight Alliances.[91][92][93]
  • February 2: Premier Notley appointed Ricardo Miranda as Minister of Tourism, became the first out queer member of the provincial cabinet[94]
  • May: David Khan was elected executive vice-president of the Alberta Liberal Party
  • June: Premier Notley marched in and addressed Edmonton Pride Parade and Festival

Central

  • Lacombe
    • August 21: Central Alberta Pride (based in Red Deer) expanded celebrations to Lacombe, including an "inclusive worship" at a United Church and a community barbecue[95]
  • Morley
    • August 26: First-ever Morley Pride, the first celebration of Two-Spirit pride on an Alberta First Nation. Its main event, Morley Pride: A Drag Diva Cabaret was held at the Stoney Nakoda Resort and Casino. Co-organized by Calgary-based drag performer and Two-Spirit activist Argintina Hailey (Cleavon Wildman) and Carla Paul, Community Programs Coordinator for the Chiniki First Nation. It featured an opening prayer from Stoney Nakoda elder Tina Fox, a speech from Banff-Cochrane MLA Cameron Westhead, performances from traditional dancers, a local band, from drag queens from Banff and Calgary, and was hosted by Two-Spirit comedian Dane Cunningham.[96] [97][98]

Calgary

  • March 31: Trans Day of Visibility (TDoV) celebration held at the Jack Singer Concert Hall as a first-time, combined effort by Calgary Pride and the Trans Equality Society of Alberta (TESA).[99] This celebration was organized to mark the addition of gender identity and expression to the Alberta Human Rights Act and other major milestones in Alberta for the trans community.[100][101]
  • September: Premier Notley marched in and addressed Calgary Pride Parade and Festival

Southern

  • Medicine Hat: city council awarded a Family and Community Support Services grant to the Medicine Hat Pride Association to assist its programmes[102]
  • Taber: August: the Taber Equality Alliance (TEA) marched in the annual Cornfest parade for the first time

2017[edit]

Northern

Edmonton

Central

  • Red Deer
    • September: Councillor Paul Harris announced he would not run for a council seat again[107][108]

Calgary

  • August: United Conservative Party (UCP) leadership candidate Jason Kenney spokesman Blaise Boehmer announced Kenney would not attend the Calgary Pride Parade because he "was not invited."[109] In response, Calgary blogger Mike Morrison and singer k.d. lang tweeted United Conservative Party leadership candidate Jason Kenney to invite him to join them at Calgary Pride and offered free concert tickets to a show by lang if he would meet them to discuss LGBTQ rights.[110] Blaise Boehmer said that the day of the parade, September 3, Kenney had "committed to attending and speaking at several large multicultural events to which he has been invited."[109]
  • August: Calgary Pride rejected the United Conservative Party's application to march in the parade
  • September 3: Premier Notley marched in and addressed Calgary Pride Parade and Festival
  • October: Out bisexual man Jeromy Farkas was elected to Calgary City Council to represent the city's Ward 11, becoming the first openly LGBTQ2+ member of Calgary's council[111][112]
  • December: Doctor and out gay man Phillip van der Merwe ran for the Alberta NDP and came second in Calgary-Lougheed by-election against United Conservative Party leader Jason Kenney. Alberta Liberal Party leader David Khan ran in Calgary-Lougheed by-election, came third. [113][114]

Southern

  • Okotoks: the Foothills Rainbow Connection held its first Pride in the Park event[115][116][117]
  • Taber:
    • March: The Taber Equality Alliance (TEA) received permission from the town council to fly a rainbow flag at their event in Confederation Park after being denied the use of the town hall’s flag pole
    • June 12: TEA held its first-ever Pride party in Confederation Park, raised a rainbow flag on the park’s community flag pole
    • June 18-30: The flag was stolen and destroyed and found on the 18, replaced with a second flag only to have the flag pole set on fire with gasoline to burn the second flag between the 17 and 18, a third rainbow flag that Lethbridge Pride donated was raised on the 19 and stayed until the 30

2018[edit]

Northern

  • Lloydminster
    • April 9-13: Lakeland College - Lloyminster Campus' LGBTQ+ Committee organized its first Pride Awareness Week,[118] hosting some events with the LGBTQ+ Society of Lloydminster[119]

Edmonton

Central

Calgary

Southern

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