Timeline of Lowell, Massachusetts

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The following is a timeline of the history of Lowell, Massachusetts, US.

19th century[edit]

  • 1822
  • 1824
    • St. Anne's Church organized.[3]
    • Lowell Daily Journal and Courier begins publication.[4]
  • 1825 - Middlesex Mechanic Association,[5] Hamilton Manufacturing Company,[3]and Mechanic Phalanx established.[6]
  • 1826
    • Town of Lowell established from Chelmsford land.[7]
    • First Baptist Church and First Universalist Church organized.[3]
    • Merrimack Journal newspaper in publication.[8]
    • Central Bridge opens.[9]
  • 1827 - First Methodist Episcopal Church organized.[3]
  • 1828 - Appleton Company, Lowell Bank, and Lowell Manufacturing Company incorporated.[3]
  • 1829
    • Lowell Institution for Savings incorporated.[3]
    • Lowell Fire Department established.[9]
  • 1830
    • Lawrence Manufacturing Company, Middlesex Company, Suffolk Manufacturing Company, and Tremont Mills incorporated.[3]
    • Appleton Street Church, South Congregational Church, and Worthen Street Baptist Church established.[3]
    • Town Hall built.[10]
    • Population: 6,474.[11]
  • 1831
    • First Roman Catholic Church organized.[3]
    • Railroad Bank incorporated.[3]
  • 1832 - Lowell Bleachery incorporated.[3]
  • 1833 - Police Court established.[12]
  • 1834
  • 1835
  • 1836
    • City of Lowell incorporated.[15]
    • Factory Girls' Association,[13] Dispensary,[6] Lowell Temperance Society,[6] and Second Universalist Parish[9] established.
  • 1838
    • Nashua and Lowell Railroad begins operating.[4]
    • County jail built.[10]
  • 1839
    • Massachusetts Cotton Mills incorporated.[9]
    • Middlesex Horticultural Society[9] and Lowell Medical Association[16] founded.
  • 1840
  • 1841
  • 1843 - First Wesleyan Methodist Church[3]and Missionary Association established.[4]
  • 1844 - City Library,[14] Lowell Female Labor Reform Association,[17] and New Jerusalem Swedenborgian Church established.[3]
  • 1845 - Lowell Machine Shop incorporated.[3]
  • 1846
  • 1847 - June: U.S. president Polk visits Lowell.[18]
  • 1848 - Francis floodgate[1] and Colburn School built.
  • 1850
    • Lowell Gas Light Company in business.[4]
    • Salem and Lowell Railroad begins operating.[4]
    • Middlesex County Law Library founded.[14]
    • Court-House built.[10]
    • Population: 33,383.[11]
  • 1851 - Lowell Daily Citizen newspaper begins publication.[4]
  • 1852 - May: Lajos Kossuth visits Lowell.[18]
  • 1853
  • 1856 - Jail built.[10]
  • 1857 - Varnum School built.
  • 1863 - High School Association organized.[12]
  • 1864 - Lowell Horse Railroad begins operating.[12]
  • 1865
    • United States Bunting Company in business.[19]
    • Wamesit Power Company incorporated.[19]
  • 1867 - St. John's Hospital and Young Men's Christian Association established.[12][20]
  • 1868 - Old Franklin Literary Association[19] and Old Residents' Historical Association organized.[21]
  • 1870 - Coggeshall's Circulating Library in business.[14]
  • 1873 - Young Women's Home established.[19]
  • 1875 - Riding Park, and Club Dramatique established.[19]
  • 1876
    • Moxie beverage invented.[22]
    • Lowell Art Association founded.
  • 1882 - Butler School built.
  • 1883
  • 1887 - Board of Trade established.[23]
  • 1889 - Opera House built.
  • 1890 - Population: 77,696.[7]
  • 1891 - Lowell General Hospital founded.[24][20]
  • 1893 - Lowell Post Office built.
  • 1894 - Normal School[1] and Middlesex Women's Club[9] founded.
  • 1895 - Middlesex Village School built.[9]
  • 1897 - Lowell Textile School opens.[1]
  • 1898 - Pawtucket Congregational Church built.

20th century[edit]

21st century[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Federal Writers' Project 1937.
  2. ^ Eno 1976.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p March 1849.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Adams 1857.
  5. ^ Catalogue of the Library of the Middlesex Mechanic Association, at Lowell, Mass., Leonard Huntress, printer, 1840, OCLC 11765136
  6. ^ a b c d Prescott 1841.
  7. ^ a b c Britannica 1910.
  8. ^ a b "US Newspaper Directory". Chronicling America. Washington DC: Library of Congress. Retrieved December 30, 2014.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Research". Lowell Historical Society. Retrieved January 25, 2014. Collections
  10. ^ a b c d e f Industries 1886.
  11. ^ a b c Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in the United States: 1790 to 1990, U.S. Census Bureau, 1998
  12. ^ a b c d Sampson 1870.
  13. ^ a b Aaron Brenner; et al., eds. (2009). "Timeline". Encyclopedia of Strikes in American History. M.E. Sharpe. ISBN 978-0-7656-2645-5.
  14. ^ a b c d Davies Project. "American Libraries before 1876". Princeton University. Retrieved October 4, 2012.
  15. ^ Anniversary 1886.
  16. ^ Floyd 1840.
  17. ^ Sue Heinemann (1996). Timelines of American Women's History. Berkley Publishing Group. ISBN 978-0-399-51986-4.
  18. ^ a b Cowley 1856.
  19. ^ a b c d e Sampson 1875.
  20. ^ a b c Mike Tigas; Sisi Wei (eds.). "Lowell, Massachusetts". Nonprofit Explorer. New York: ProPublica. Retrieved December 30, 2014.
  21. ^ Contributions of the Old Residents' Historical Association, Lowell, Mass.: The Association, 1873
  22. ^ Andrew F. Smith (2011). "Chronology". Fast Food and Junk Food: An Encyclopedia. Greenwood. ISBN 978-0-313-39393-8.
  23. ^ Ellis 1899.
  24. ^ Coburn 1920.
  25. ^ a b c d "Movie Theaters in Lowell, MA". CinemaTreasures.org. Los Angeles: Cinema Treasures LLC. Retrieved December 30, 2014.
  26. ^ Lowell Historical Society (1902), By-Laws, Lowell, Mass.
  27. ^ "To understand Market Basket feud, head to Lowell", Boston Globe, July 31, 2014
  28. ^ Stanton 2006.
  29. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 69th Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1926.
  30. ^ "Tradition of City's Golden Gloves", Lowell Sun, January 6, 2016
  31. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 95th Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1977.
  32. ^ a b Boston Globe 1992.
  33. ^ Goldstein 2000.
  34. ^ "Ex-Lowell official pleads guilty in bribe case", Boston Globe, August 31, 2011
  35. ^ "Wang Headquarters Auctioned for $525,000", New York Times, February 17, 1994
  36. ^ United States Census Bureau (1984), County and City Data Book, 1983, Statistical Abstract, Washington DC, OL 14997563M
  37. ^ "Lowell Historic Board History". City of Lowell. Retrieved July 26, 2013.
  38. ^ a b American Association for State and Local History (2002). "Massachusetts: Lowell". Directory of Historical Organizations in the United States and Canada. ISBN 0759100020.
  39. ^ a b Pluralism Project. "Lowell, Massachusetts". Directory of Religious Centers. Harvard University. Retrieved July 26, 2013.
  40. ^ "FAQ". Lowell Folk Festival. Retrieved October 4, 2012.
  41. ^ "Community Links". City of Lowell. Archived from the original on July 23, 2004.
  42. ^ "Welcome to the City of Lowell, MA". Archived from the original on December 1998 – via Internet Archive, Wayback Machine.
  43. ^ "Lowell manager's resignation may herald a power shift", Boston Globe, April 30, 2006 – via Boston Public Library
  44. ^ "University of Massachusetts, Lowell". Dallas, TX: National String Project Consortium. Retrieved October 26, 2013.
  45. ^ "About Us". Cultural Organization of Lowell. Retrieved October 26, 2013.
  46. ^ "Court dance connects New England and Cambodia", Boston Globe, August 5, 2001 – via Boston Public Library
  47. ^ "Lowell's new city manager rolls up sleeves", Boston Globe, December 28, 2006 – via Boston Public Library
  48. ^ "Shree Swaminarayan Temple". Shree Swaminarayan Sampraday. International Swaminarayan Satsang Organisation. Retrieved July 26, 2013.
  49. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 112th Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 2011.
  50. ^ "Meet the Mayors". Washington, DC: United States Conference of Mayors. Archived from the original on June 27, 2008. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  51. ^ "Lowell (city), Massachusetts". State & County QuickFacts. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on November 4, 2014. Retrieved December 30, 2014.
  52. ^ "Seven Die, Including 3 Children, in Massachusetts Fire", New York Times, July 10, 2014

Bibliography[edit]

Published in the 19th century
Published in the 20th century
Published in the 21st century
  • Carolyn M. Goldstein (2000). "Many Voices, True Stories, and the Experiences We Are Creating in Industrial History Museums: Reinterpreting Lowell, Massachusetts". Public Historian. 22. JSTOR 3379583.
  • "Around Boston: Lowell", New England (3rd ed.), Lonely Planet, 2002, p. 172+, OL 24765202M
  • Cathy Stanton (2006). The Lowell Experiment: Public History in a Postindustrial City. University of Massachusetts Press. ISBN 1-55849-547-9.

External links[edit]

Images[edit]

Coordinates: 42°38′22″N 71°18′53″W / 42.639444°N 71.314722°W / 42.639444; -71.314722