Timeline of Montreal history

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The timeline of the history of Montreal shows the significant events in the history of Montreal that transformed it from a small fort into a big city of North America.

Pre-European period[edit]

  • The area known today as Montreal had been inhabited by the Algonquins, Huron, and Iroquois for some 2,000 years, while the oldest known artifact found in Montréal proper is about 2,000 years old.[1]
  • In the earliest oral history, the Algonquins were from the Atlantic coast. Together with other Anicinàpek, they arrived at the "First Stopping Place" (Montréal). There, the Nation found a "turtle-shaped island" marked by miigis (cowrie) shells.
  • The Iroquois or Haudenosaunee were centred from at least 1000 CE in northern New York, but their influence extended into what is now southern Ontario and the Montréal area of modern Quebec.[2]
  • 1142 – The Iroquois Confederacy is, from oral tradition, supposed to have been formed in 1142 CE.[3]
  • In the modern Iroquois language, Montréal is called Tiohtià:ke. Other native languages, such as Algonquin, refer to it as Moniang.[4]
  • The St. Lawrence Iroquoians established the village of Hochelaga at the foot of Mount Royal.[5]

16th Century[edit]

Main article: Jacques Cartier
  • 1535 – Jacques Cartier renames the Saint Lawrence River in honour of the Deacon Lawrence on August 10 (Feast day of the Roman martyr). Prior to this, the Saint Lawrence River had been known by other names, including the Hochelaga River and the Canada River. Cartier penetrates far into the interior for the first time, via the river.
  • 1535 – September 19, Cartier starts his journey from Quebec City to Montréal, while in search of a passage to Asia.
  • 1535 – Cartier visits Hochelaga on October 2, claiming the St. Lawrence Valley for France.[6] He becomes the first European to reach the area now known as Montréal when he enters the village of Hochelega. Cartier estimates the population to be "over a thousand".
  • 1535 – October 3, Cartier climbs up the mountain on the Île de Montréal and names it Mont Royal. He wrote: "Nous nommasmes icelle montaigne le mont Royal." (We named the said mountain Mont Royal.) The name Montréal is generally thought to be derived from "Mont Royal", the name given to the mountain by Cartier in 1535.
  • 1556 – On his map of Hochelega, Italian geographer Giovanni Battista Ramusio writes "Monte Real" to designate Mont Royal.
  • 1580 – The St. Lawrence Iroquoians seem to have vacated the Saint Lawrence River valley sometime prior to 1580.

17th Century[edit]

1610 - 1629[edit]

1630 - 1649[edit]

Jeanne Mance, Maisonneuve Monument

1650s - 1669[edit]

Louis Prud'homme

1670 - 1689[edit]

Louis Jolliet statue, Parliament Building (Quebec)

1690s[edit]

  • 1690 - February 8: Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville leads more than 160 French Canadians and 100 Indian warriors to Schenectady, New York which they attack and burn in retaliation for the Lachine Massacre.
  • 1690 – The Citadel, Montreal built.
  • 1694 – Louis Tantouin de la Touche is named subdelegate of the intendant.
  • 1694 – Frères Hospitaliers de la Croix et de Saint-Joseph, known after their founder as the Frères Charon, founded.
  • 1694 – Louis-Hector de Callière is awarded the cross of Saint-Louis. During his years as governor of Montreal, the Iroquois war has enhanced the importance of that position.
  • 1694 – François Vachon de Belmont completes the mission on the slopes of Mount Royal. Its circular stone fortress towers still stand on the grounds of the Grand Seminary on Sherbrooke Street.
  • 1695 – Nicolas Perrot brings the Miami, Sauk, Menominee, Potawatomi and Fox chiefs to Montréal at the governor's request, regarding war with the Iroquois.
  • 1695 – Saint-Charles-Sur-Richelieu is granted to Zacharie-François Hertel, Sieur de la Fresnière (March 1).
  • 1696 – Fire at Fort de la Montagne. The Hurons are transferred to Fort Lorette.
  • 1696 – Jacques Le Ber is ennobled.
  • 1698 – A chapel dedicated to St. Anne is founded at the south end of Murray street. Le Quartier Ste-Anne becomes infamous as a den of licentiousness, and the clergy restricts the sale of liquor around the chapel.
  • 1698 – Bishop Saint-Vallier, returning from France, accompanies two English gentlemen, one of them a Protestant minister, on a visit to Jeanne Le Ber.
  • 1700 – At the turn of the 18th century Montreal's population is about 1,500 souls, which gradually grows to about 7,500 in the year 1760, at the time of the British conquest.
  • 1700 – Gédéon de Catalogne is employed by the Sulpicians in October to dig the Lachine Canal.
  • 1700-31 – François Vachon de Belmont is the fifth superior of the Montréal Sulpicians.

18th century[edit]

1701 – 1719[edit]

  • 1705 – Montreal is now the official name for the city formerly named Ville-Marie.
  • 1705 – Place Royale is designated as a market\ place.
  • 1706 – After 1706, deforestation along the riverbank is advanced enough that the opening of a road along the lake, from La Présentation to the tip of the Île de Montréal, is decreed.
  • 1709 – Slavery becomes legal in New France.
  • 1711 – The court orders the construction of a stone wall around the city.
  • 1713 – Jurisdiction of the Government of Montreal begins to the west of Maskinongé, Quebec and Yamaska and ends at the extremity of the inhabited area, namely fort Saint-Jean, Châteauguay and Vaudreuil.
  • 1713 – Michel Bégon decides to erect stone fortifications. The wooden walls are replaced with stone due to the threat of British attack.
  • 1713 – Pointe-Claire parish is first established in the name of St. Francis of Sales and dedicated to St. Joachim the following year.
  • 1717–1744 – Stone fortifications were erected according to plans by the architect Gaspard-Joseph Chaussegros de Léry. The fortifications correspond roughly to the present-day limits of Old Montreal, with Rue Berri to the east, Rue de la Commune to the south, Rue McGill to the west, and Ruelle de la Fortification to the north.
  • 1719 – Pointe-aux-Trembles windmill is built at the corner of Notre-Dame Street and Third Avenue. Its three storeys make it the tallest windmill in Quebec that still stands.

1720 - 1739[edit]

  • 1721 – The great fire. New wood constructions are prohibited inside city limits.
  • 1726 – A dam is built to link the river bank to the Île de la Visitation – one of the most impressive feats of civil engineering of the French regime. It remains in operation until 1960.
  • 1731 – Orchards covered 90 arpents (76 acres; 31 ha) on the Île de Montréal, on the side of the mountain and around town. From 1731 to 1781, the surface area occupied by the orchards rise from 90 to 402 arpents (76 to 340 acres; 31 to 137 ha).
  • 1732 – Montreal earthquake at 11:00 a.m. on September 16.
  • 1734 – The construction of Fort St. Frédéric begins.
  • 1734 – Marie-Joseph Angélique (a slave owned by Thérèse de Couagne) is tried and convicted of setting fire to her owner's home, burning much of what is now referred to as Old Montreal.
  • 1737 – Inauguration of the Chemin du Roy on the North Shore (Laval) between Montréal and Quebec City. The road's construction takes 4 years and requires the construction of 13 bridges. After its completion, people can travel from one city to the other in 4 days.
  • 1737 – Plague Epidemic.
  • 1738 – Marie-Marguerite d'Youville founds the Grey Nuns. In 1747, she becomes director of the Hôtel-Dieu de Montréal.

1740 - 1759[edit]

Henri-Marie Dubreil de Pontbriand

1760 - 1779[edit]

1780 - 1800[edit]

  • 1783 – The North West Company of Montreal is officially created.
  • 1783 – A lottery is started in Montreal to defray the cost of a new jail.
  • 1783 – Fleury Mesplet gets out of prison in September.
  • 1785 – Fleury Mesplet founds the newspaper The Montreal Gazette / Gazette de Montréal on August 28.
  • 1785 – In February, the Beaver Club is formed by members of the North West Company.
  • 1785 – A dark day on October 10. Candles are lighted at noon.
  • 1785 – Maison Papineau (or Maison John-Campbell) is built at 440 Bonsecours Street. It will be modified in 1831 and 1965.
  • 1786 – John Molson founds the Molson Brewery.
  • 1787 – Prince William Henry, later William IV, arrives at Montreal on September 8.
  • 1787–1811 – John Reid is justice of the peace for the district of Montreal, which governs Montreal's affairs.
  • 1788 – The Gazette, formerly a French journal, appears in English.
  • 1789 – Lord Grenville proposes that land in Upper Canada be held in free and common soccage, and that the tenure of Lower Canadian lands be optional with the inhabitants.
  • 1789 – May 4 – The justices of the peace, who govern Montreal's affairs, order "the price and assize of bread, for this month" to be: "the white loaf of 4lbs. at 13d., or 30 sous", etc., and that bakers of the city and suburbs do conform thereto, and mark their bread with their initials.
  • 1789 – Christ Church opens for service on December 20.
  • 1791 – Edmund Burke supports the proposed constitution for Canada, saying that "To attempt to amalgamate two populations, composed of races of men diverse in language, laws and habitudes, is complete absurdity. Let the proposed constitution be founded on man's nature, the only solid basis for an enduring government."
  • 1792 – December 20 – a fortnightly mail is established between Canada and the United States.
  • 1792 – Opening of the first post office in Montréal on 20 December.
  • 1793 – Importation of slaves into Canada is prohibited on July 9.
  • 1799 – Mary Griffin obtains the lease to Griffintown from a business associate of Thomas McCord.
  • 1799 – The census of 1799 lists 9,000 inhabitants while that of 1761 lists 5,500.
  • 1799 – Citizens of Montreal petition to secure master's rights over slaves
  • 1799 – A measure respecting slavery in Lower Canada does not pass.
  • 1799 – Of twenty-one members of Council, in Lower Canada, six are French Canadians.
  • 1799 – The Court House is completed.
  • 1799 – January 3 – Parliament appropriates $5,000 for a new Montreal Court House.
  • 1800 – Alexander Skakel moves from Quebec City to Montréal and establishes the Classical and Mathematical School. This was the principal educational institution for the English-speaking population.
  • 1800 – Thomas Walker is elected to the Legislative Assembly of Lower Canada for Montreal County.
  • 1800 – Thomas Porteous (merchant) purchases the seigneury of Terrebonne.

19th century[edit]

1801 - 1819[edit]

  • 1802 The first unofficial cavalry corps is formed in Montreal.
  • 1803-15 – With the Napoleonic Wars comes a demand for large amounts of squared timber for shipbuilding. Montreal is able to fulfil the demand, and this expansion of the city's economic base is reflected in a rise in population to 26,154 by the year 1825.
  • 1804-17 – The demolition of Montréal's fortifications takes 13 years, from 1804 to 1817.
  • 1805 – Thomas McCord returns to Montreal and recovers his land, which has been divided by Mary Griffin into streets and lots. The name Griffintown sticks.
  • 1805 – Thomas Porteous (merchant) opens a store at Sainte-Thérèse-de-Blainville, where he also produces potash.
  • 1807 – May – The Canadian Courant and Montreal Advertiser are first issued; owner and editor: Nahum Mower.
  • 1807 – The brothers James and Charles Brown begin publishing the Canadian Gazette/Gazette canadienne in July.
  • 1807 – An Act provides for a new market house in Montreal.
  • 1808 – In early 1808, sick and in debt, Edward Edwards sells the Montreal Gazette to the Browns, who the following month announce their plan to revive it.
  • 1808 – Importation of slaves is banned.
  • 1808 – July 12 – 5 privates of the 100th Regiment, Montreal, are charged with desertion and are transported as felons to New South Wales for 7 years, afterwards to serve as soldiers in that colony.
  • 1808-11 – A new prison is built.
  • 1809 – August 17 – The foundation of Nelson's Column is laid in Montreal. Installed on Place Jacques-Cartier, this is the second monument to be erected in Montreal.
  • 1809 – November 3 – John Molson's steamboat PS Accommodation sails from Montreal to Quebec. It is 85 feet over all, has a 6 horse-power engine, makes the distance in 36 hours, but stops at night and reaches Quebec on the 6th. The PS Accommodation is the second steam-oat in America and probably in the world. The fare for an adult is £2.10s.od =$10.
  • 1810 – John Jacob Astor founds the Pacific Fur Company. (His great-grandson, John Jacob Astor IV died on the RMS Titanic).
  • 1811 – Founding of the newspaper the Montreal Herald by William Grey and Mungo Kay, founders, owners and publishers.
  • 1812 – June 18 – The United States declares war against Great Britain over territorial disputes in Canada (War of 1812).
  • 1812 – July 11 – U.S. troops invade Canada.
  • 1814 – The Treaty of Ghent ends the War of 1812 between the United States and Britain.
  • 1815 - John Molson builds the luxurious Mansion House Hotel on Rue St. Paul.
  • 1815 – March – Parliament votes $25,000 for Lachine Canal.
  • 1816 – Population of Montreal is about 16,000.
  • 1816 – The National School is opened.
  • 1816 – May 14 – Thomas A. Turner and Robert Armour, Esq., are appointed commissioners for the improvement of internal navigation between Montreal and Lachine, under the Provincial Act 48 George III,c.19.
  • 1816-18 – John Coape Sherbrooke is the Governor General of British North America; Sherbrooke Street and the town of Sherbrooke are named after him.
  • 1817 – The Bank of Montreal begins operations in June. Mary Griffin's husband, Robert, is the first clerk.
  • 1817 – Guy Streetias named on August 30 for Étienne Guy, a notary who gave the city the land for the street.
  • 1818 – Saint Helen's Island was purchased by the British government. Fort de l'Île Sainte-Hélène was built on the island as defences for the city, in consequence of the War of 1812.
  • 1819 – Darkness at noon on November 9.

1820 - 1839[edit]

  • 1821 – The Earl of Dalhousie presents Dalhousie Square to Montreal
  • 1821 – March 31 – McGill University established by Royal Charter.
  • 1821 – Beginning of Lachine Canal excavations on July 17.
  • 1821 – The British garrison starts the construction of the Fort de l'Île Sainte-Hélène. It is completed in 1823 and partially rebuilt in 1863 after a fire as a preventive measure against an eventual American attack.
  • 1822 – The first iron bridge is erected on March 8.
  • 1822 – May 1 – The Montreal General Hospital building is completed.
  • 1822 – In September, a whale (42 feet 8 inches in length, 6 feet across the back, and 7 feet deep) finds its way up the Saint Lawrence River.
  • 1824 – Recollet Convent opens as a school for Irish children.
  • 1824 – First Saint Patrick's Day Parade organized on March 17.
  • 1824 – Construction on the new Notre-Dame Basilica (Montreal) begins, designed by New York architect James O'Donnell, an Irish Protestant.
  • 1825 – The Lachine Canal is opened, and new industries spring up in the St. Antoine ward area as a direct outcome of the easier transport of goods. Shipping immediately increases and, along with the destruction of the city walls, Montreal comes to be an economic, rather than military, city. Gradually, the city's harbour facilities expand. In 1830 the wharves are rudimentary and stretched for only a short distance along De la Commune Street.
  • 1825 – First permanent theatre building in Montreal, Theatre Royal, is built by John Molson to attract bigger names to the city, which lacked such a venue. It costs the magnate $30,000. The building is demolished in 1844 and the site was used for the Bonsecours Market. Another venue, also called Theatre Royal, was built not far away in Old Montreal; this building, too, no longer exists.
  • 1826-37 and 1842-99 – La Minerve published.
  • 1827 – Fleming windmill (13, avenue Strathyre) built.
  • 1829 – Most of Notre-Dame Basilica (Montreal) is now completed. Work continues for more than a decade on the two bell towers. A new skyline begins to develop.
  • 1830 – The Montreal harbour is officially incorporated.
  • 1831 – Alexis de Tocqueville visits Montreal in August–September.
  • 1832 – Charter of incorporation for the city of Montreal (27,000 inhabitants).
Acte pour incorporer la Cité de Montréal

1840 - 1859[edit]

  • 1840 – The Act of Union combines Lower Canada and Upper Canada.
  • 1840 – August 19 – Lachine Rapids first navigated in a steamboat.
  • 1841 – There are now at least 6,500 Irish Catholics in Montreal. Most of the immigrants to Montreal settle in Griffintown, particularly in the area west of McGill Street (Montreal). In this district, the area between the Lachine Railroad and the Lachine Canal becomes a slum. Much like the french slums of Hochelaga Maisonneuve to the east.
  • 1841 – West Bell Tower of Notre-Dame Basilica (Montreal), called "Perseverance" and housing the 10,900 kg bell "Le Gros Bourdon" / "Jean-Baptiste", completed.
  • 1842 – In May, Charles Dickens appears at Theatre Royal, in Montreal, surrounded by local talent. While Dickens is in Montreal he produces, directs and acts in three plays.
  • 1843 – The Cornwall Canal and the Chambly Canal are opened.
  • 1843 – Survey of the boundary between the U.S. and Canada is begun.
  • 1843 – Montreal Police Service established on March 15.
  • 1843 – The first labour strike in Canada occurs. The Lachine Canal was widened in the 1840s under conditions of bitter conflict between contractors and Irish labourers.
  • 1843 – After completion of the East Bell Tower of Notre-Dame Basilica (Montreal), called "Temperance" and housing a ten-bell carillon, Notre-Dame Basilica (Montreal) is finally completed.
  • 1843 – Superior Joseph-Vincent Quiblier authorizes construction of St. Patrick's Church for the city's English-speaking Roman Catholics.
  • 1843 – Foundation of the religious congregation of the Sisters of Providence by Émilie Gamelin.
  • 1843 – Foundation of the religious congregation Saints-Noms-de-Jésus-et-de-Marie.
  • 1844 – Government moves from Kingston to Montreal.
  • 1844 – The seat of the government of Canada East and Canada West is moved from Kingston to Montréal.
  • 1844 – Église Sainte-Geneviève (Montréal) completed.
  • 1845 – Ottawa Hotel, Montreal built.
  • 1845 – Morgan's store opens.
  • 1846 – Foundation of the Montreal City and District Savings Bank, now known as the Laurentian Bank.
  • 1847 – The Montreal Telegraph Company founded. In 1850, the year prior to Hugh Allan's presidency, Montreal Telegraph Co operated merely 500 miles of line, all in the province of Canada.
  • 1847 – Telegraph service between Montréal and Toronto, between Montréal and Quebec City, and between Montréal and New York City established.
  • 1847 – Bonsecours Market opened. It housed City Hall between 1852 and 1878.
  • 1847 – The railway from Montreal to Lachine is opened.
  • 1847 – Desbarats & Derbyshire (Georges-Édouard Desbarats and Stewart Derbyshire) start a glass factory at Vaudreuil.
  • 1847 – The first mass is celebrated in St. Patrick's Basilica on St. Patrick's Day, March 17.
  • 1847 – September 1 – Lord Elgin visits the fever sheds at Windmill Point.
  • 1847 – October 23 – 65 immigrants die in a week at Windmill Point.
  • 1847 – November 1–9, 634 deaths of mostly Irish immigrants since January 1.
  • 1847 – November – Death of John Easton Mills, mayor of Montreal, as he tends the sick in the fever sheds
  • 1847-48 – In all, between 3,500 and 6,000 Irish immigrants die of the Typhus epidemic of 1847 at Windmill Point.
  • 1848 – January 2 – Wellington and Commissioners streets flooded.
  • 1848 – July 5 – Run on the Savings Bank, Montreal, followed by re-deposit.
  • 1848 – Foundation of the religious congregation of Sisters of Mercy.
  • 1849 – Burning of the Parliament Buildings in Montreal.
  • 1849 – Beauharnois Canal is opened.
  • 1849 – April 25 – For sanctioning the Rebellion Losses Bill, Lord Elgin is mobbed and the Parliament House in Montreal is burned. Parliament will now sit alternately in Quebec and Toronto.
  • 1850 – Anglican Diocese of Montreal established.
  • 1850 – Opening of the Ann Street School.
  • 1850 – Beginning of the dredging of the St. Lawrence to allow seagoing ships to reach to Montreal.
  • 1851 – Grand Trunk Railway Company formed.
  • 1851 – November 19 – First YMCA on the continent opened in Montreal.
  • 1851-53 – Église Saint-Pierre-Apôtre de Montréal built.
  • 1852 – Laval University is opened.
  • 1852 – July 8 – Beginning of Great Fire of 1852, which burns 11,000 houses in Montreal; 20% of the eastern side of the city is devastated.
  • 1853 – The first screw steamer up the Saint Lawrence River arrives from Liverpool. Canadian Steam Navigation Company runs regular services from Liverpool and Glasgow to Quebec City and Montreal, twice a month in summer and once a month in winter.
  • 1853 – May 23 – First charter for steamers from Montreal to Great Britain.
  • 1853 – June 9 – Alessandro Gavazzi's anticlerical speeches at Montreal's First Congregational Church (Zion Church) spark riots that kill 40 people.
  • 1853 – June 18 – The Grand Trunk Railway opens to Portland. Portland becones the primary ice-free winter seaport for Canadian exports.
  • 1853 – July 22 – Pier No.1 of the Victoria Bridge is begun.
  • 1853 – Notre-Dame-de-Grâce built.
  • 1854 – Villa Maria founded.
  • 1854 – July – Six Nations Indians offer to fight the Queen's enemies anywhere
  • 1854 – July 20 – The first stone of the Victoria Bridge across the St. Lawrence is laid.
  • 1854 – August 2 – First coffer-dam of Victoria Bridge ready for masonry.
  • 1854 – October 16 – Twenty-one vessels in port at Montreal.
  • 1854 – St. Ann's Church is consecrated, becoming the centre of Griffintown life; it opens on December 8 (Feast of the Immaculate Conception) and was designed by John Ostell. The Sulpicians donated the land for the church and provided the Irish-born pastors: Father Michael O'Brien, Father Michael O'Farrell and Father James Hogan (priest 1867–1884). Some residents of Griffintown claim that St. Ann's ("down the hill") was actually more of a center for the Irish in Montreal than St. Patrick's Basilica, Montreal's ("up the hill") was, since most of the city's Irish lived in Griffintown.
  • 1854 – Cholera kills more than 1,000 citizens.
  • 1854 – Canada Steamship Lines Inc. established.
  • 1855 – The Redpath Sugar Refinery opens.
  • 1855 – Hugh Allan and Andrew Allan establish the Montreal Ocean Steamship Company, with four steamships fortnightly.
  • 1855 – October 19 – G.T. Railway is open to Brockville.
  • 1856 – Montreal's Water Works made ready for use
  • 1856 – The Allan's four steamships, between Montreal and Liverpool bring 3,031 passengers, Westward (average voyage 13 days).
  • 1856 – September 16 – Balloon ascension from Griffintown, in the "Canada"
  • 1856 – The Grand Trunk Railway begins through passenger service between Montreal and Toronto on October 27 with great celebrations being held in Kingston to celebrate this accomplishment.
  • 1856 – December 10 – Burning of Christ Church Cathedral (Montreal).
  • 1857 – June 13–26 ocean steamships at Montreal today
  • 1857 – June 26 – Fire on board the steamer "Montreal" en route from Quebec to Montreal – 253 lives lost, including Stephen C. Phillips.
  • 1857 – September 7 – 500 of the 39th Regiment leave Montreal, possibly for the Crimea.
  • 1857 – Saint-Enfant-Jésus du Mile-End Church completed.
  • 1857 – The lower part of Griffintown entirely submerged by river flooding.
  • 1857–2000 – Seagram opens. The former Seagram headquarters in Montreal now belongs to McGill University under the name Martlet House.
  • 1858 – Formation of the Royal Canadian Regiment.
  • 1858 – January 27 – The Queen names Ottawa the seat of government
  • 1858 – February 20 – In Griffintown, beds stand in three feet of water
  • 1858 – Riots and street fights run rampant through Griffintown on election day when D'Arcy McGee is chosen to represent the Montreal West riding, including Griffintown, in the federal government.
  • 1859 – Mgr Ignace Bourget condemns the Institut canadien de Montréal, excommunicating its members, and on July 7, 1869, Rome adds the institute's Annuaire for the year 1868 to the Catholic Church's Index of prohibited books.
  • 1859 – December 12 – The Victoria Bridge opens.
  • 1859 – December 17 – The first passenger train passes through the Victoria Bridge.
  • 1859 – The Black Rock is erected by canal workers on Bridge St. to honour the Windmill Point victims of cholera.
  • 1859 – Foundation of the National Bank of Canada.

1860 - 1879[edit]

  • 1860 – Victoria Square, Montreal opens.
  • 1860 – February 20 – The wreck of the Allan Line steamship SS Hungarian with a number of Montrealers on board.
  • 1860 – May – Crystal Palace built for the Montreal Industrial Exhibition of 1860.
  • 1860 – August 25 – The Prince of Wales visits Montreal.
  • 1860 – August 25 – Opening of the Victoria Railway Bridge.
  • 1860 – November 27 – Opening of the Christ Church Cathedral (Montreal).
  • 1861 – The street horsecar is introduced as public transportation on 27 November. It was operated by Montreal City Passenger Railway Company 1861–1886.
  • 1861 – Griffintown again flooded.
  • 1861 – January – British troops ordered to Canada.
  • 1861 – January 18 – A meeting in Montreal, respecting extradition of John Anderson, a slave charged with murder, is addressed by Hon. Messrs.
  • 1861 – February – John Anderson not to be surrendered without instructions from England.
  • 1861 – April 15 – Great inundation at Montreal.
  • 1861 – June 13 – Prince Alfred arrives in Montreal.
  • 1861 – June 6 – Formation of the Canada Presbyterian Church by fusion of the Free Church and the United Presbyterian body.
  • 1861 – December – Six steamers chartered to bring troops to Canada.
  • 1861 – St. John the Evangelist Anglican Church (Montreal) founded.
  • 1862 – The Montreal Corn Exchange Association is organized.
  • 1862 – Montreal Sailor's Institute founded.
  • 1862 – Ocean steamers trading to Montreal have increased from 5,545 tons in 1854, to 62,912; other ocean vessels from 58,416 to 195,348 tons.
  • 1862 – January – Military companies are organizing throughout Canada.
  • 1862 – January 4 – Victoria Bridge is guarded to prevent its destruction, threatened from the USA.
  • 1862 – April 2 – By-law to establish a Montreal Fire Department.
  • 1862 – May 20 – The Montreal Water Works are commenced.
  • 1863 – Bounties for USA recruits and substitutes often reach $2,000, inducing kidnapping and contraventions of the British Foreign Enlistment Act, for which heavy bail is exacted.
  • 1863 – Fire Alarm established on January 19.
  • 1863 – May 12 – Protestant House of Refuge in Montreal incorporated.
  • 1863 – Art Association of Montreal incorporated.
  • 1864 – The Montreal City Passenger Railway Company has 10 miles of track, $240,000 paid capital and carries 1,485,725 passengers at 5 cents each.
  • 1864 – In October, delegates from across British North America developed the terms for Confederation at a three-week conference in Quebec City. After the Quebec Conference, there remained the task of selling Confederation to the citizens.
  • 1864 – November 10 – Continued examination of raiders at Montreal.
  • 1865 – The Parliament of Upper Canada and Lower Canada favors Confederation.
  • 1865 – The Montreal Board of Trade Building erected in 1855 is burned.
  • 1865 – July 11–14 – Convention at Detroit to promote a new Reciprocity treaty. Montrealers attend, but only to give desired information. The Convention passes resolutions favouring a new Reciprocity treaty.
  • 1865 – December 3 – Church of the Gesu opened. It was built and designed by Irish architect Patrick Keely.
  • 1866 – Molson Bank Building, Montreal built.
  • 1866 – The Montreal Glass Co., at Hudson, makes chimneys, bottles and insulators.
  • 1866 – March 13 – The Prince of Wales Regiment and Battery of Artillery leave Montreal to repel Fenian invaders.
  • 1866 – March 17 – The Canadian-American Reciprocity Treaty terminates
  • 1866 – July 18 – The 47th Regiment reaches Montreal from Kingston.
  • 1866 – First successful transatlantic telegraph cable is laid.
  • 1867 – Canada East becomes the Province of Quebec.
  • 1867 – March – Cornerstone of St. Patrick's Hall, Montreal, laid
  • 1867 – July 1 – The Dominion of Canada is formed by the confederation of several provinces.
  • 1868 – Thomas D'Arcy McGee is assassinated by pistol shot in April. He is given a state funeral in Ottawa and interred in the Cimetière Notre-Dame-des-Neiges. Patrick J. Whelan, a Fenian sympathizer, is accused, tried, convicted, and hanged for the crime.
  • 1869 – First Transcontinental Railroad completed on May 10.
  • 1869 – Red River Rebellion.
  • 1869 – Collège Notre-Dame du Sacré-Cœur established.
  • 1869 – Montreal Star founded.
  • 1870 – Second Fenian Raid
  • 1872 – Montreal Exchange created.
  • 1872 – Montreal Royals founded.
  • 1872-78 – Montreal City Hall is built.
  • 1872 – November 21, Lord Dufferin, the Governor-General, formally presents the statue of Queen Victoria in Victoria Square to the city.
  • 1873-82 – Chapelle Notre-Dame-de-Lourdes de Montréal built.
  • 1874 – Saint Helen's Island becomes a fashionable park.
  • 1874 – Shaughnessy House built for Duncan McIntyre by architect William T. Thomas. McIntyre sells it to William Van Horne who in turn sells it to Thomas Shaughnessy. The house is declared a national historic site in 1974 and is now part of the Canadian Centre for Architecture.
  • 1875 – September 2 – The Guibord case occasions some ill feeling in Montreal, but by the energetic action of Dr. William Hales Hingston, the Mayor, there are no riots.
  • 1875 – Hockey, in the form known today, is first played in Montreal in 1875, according to rules devised by James George Aylwin Creighton, a McGill University student.
  • 1875 – June 15 – Formation of the Presbyterian Church in Canada.
  • 1875 – Montreal Academy of Music inaugurated.
  • 1875 – Montreal and New York City are now linked by train.
  • 1876 – Dorchester Square opened.
  • 1876 – Place du Canada opened.
  • 1876 – Inauguration of Mount Royal Park on May 24.
  • 1877 – Thomas George Roddick introduces Lister's antiseptic methods to the Montreal General Hospital.
  • 1877 – The first telephone conversation in Quebec.
  • 1878 – Université de Montréal is established.
  • 1878 – Windsor Hotel completed.
  • 1876 – Mount Royal Park opened.
  • 1879 – Mary Gallagher is murdered by jealous rival Susan Kennedy on June 27. It is a sensational story. It's said Gallagher's ghost returns every seven years to haunt Griffintown.
  • 1879 – In a strange turn of events, Michael Flanagan, cleared of all charges regarding the death of Mary Gallagher, is loading barges in the Wellington Basin when he falls and drowns on December 5, the very same day Susan Kennedy was supposed to be hanged.

1880 - 1900[edit]

20th century[edit]

1900 - 1919[edit]

1920 - 1939[edit]

1940 - 1959[edit]

1960 - 1979[edit]

1980-1999[edit]

21st century[edit]

2001-2013[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Place Royale and the Amerindian presence". Société de développement de Montréal. September 2001. Retrieved 2007-03-09. 
  2. ^ The Canadian Encyclopedia, Iroquois
  3. ^ Bruce E. Johanson, Dating the Iroquois Confederacy
  4. ^ http://geonames.nrcan.gc.ca/education/montreal_e.php
  5. ^ Tremblay, Roland (2006). The Saint Lawrence Iroquoians. Corn People. Montreal, Qc: Les Éditions de l'Homme. 
  6. ^ "Jacques Cartier: New Land for the French King". Pathfinders & Passageways. Archived from the original on 2007-02-16. Retrieved 2007-02-26. 
  7. ^ (French) "La Première messe sur île de Montréal - 24 juin 1615"[dead link]
  8. ^ "Ontario's Pioneer Priest" by John J. O'Gorman[dead link]
  9. ^ Sneath, Allen Winn (2001). ""Brewing in the New Land"". Brewed in Canada. Toronto and Oxford: The Dundurn Group. pp. 21–22. 
  10. ^ Roland Auger, La Grande Recrue de 1653. Publications de la Société généalogique canadienne-française (Montreal, 1955).
  11. ^ NRC. "New France circa 1740", in The Atlas of Canada, Natural Resources Canada, 2003-10-06. Retrieved August 3, 2008.
  12. ^ Le Quebec et Bourgues
  13. ^ Societe d'Histoire de la Region de Terrebonne
  14. ^ Theatre and Politics in Modern Quebec (1989) by Elaine Nardoccio
  15. ^ Smith (1907), vol 1, p. 474
  16. ^ Shelton, pp. 122–127
  17. ^ Stanley, p. 131
  18. ^ http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1946&dat=19380719&id=1JEjAAAAIBAJ&sjid=dqgFAAAAIBAJ&pg=6052%2C2123265
  19. ^ "CRTC Origins". Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission. 2008-09-05. Retrieved 2009-11-15. 
  20. ^ Census of Canada, 1941, Census of Canada, 1951
  21. ^ Census of Canada, 1961
  22. ^ Census of Canada, 1971
  23. ^ "A Short History of Toronto". City of Toronto. Retrieved 2009-03-26. 
  24. ^ Statistics Canada (2002). "Community Highlights for Montréal". Retrieved 2007-02-22. 

External links[edit]