Timeline of Rijeka

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Rijeka, Croatia.

Prior to 19th century[edit]

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  • 3rd century CE – Roman triumphal arch erected.[1]
  • 799 CE – Town sacked by forces of Charlemagne (approximate date).[2]
  • 1139 – "Counts of Duino" in power.[1]
  • 1377 – Church of the Assumption founded.[1]
  • 1453 – Virgin Mary pilgrimage church established near town.[3]
  • 1471 – Austrians in power.[1]
  • 1638 – St. Vitus Cathedral founded.
  • 1722 – Fiume becomes a free port.[4]
  • 1779 – Town becomes part of the Kingdom of Hungary.[3]
  • 1790 – Church of St. Nicholas built.

19th century[edit]

  • 1809 – Town occupied by French forces.[1]
  • 1813 – Town taken by British forces.[1]
  • 1822 – Town ceded to Hungary.[1]
  • 1849 – Town becomes part of Croatia.[4]
  • 1851 - Population: 10,568.[5]
  • 1856 – Imperial Naval Academy founded.[6]
  • 1870 – Town becomes part of the Kingdom of Hungary again.[1]
  • 1872 – Drenova becomes part of Fiume.[citation needed]
  • 1873 – Railway begins operating.[1]
  • 1875 – Whitehead's torpedo manufactory in operation.
  • 1877 – Port built.[2]
  • 1890 - Population: 30,337.[7]
  • 1891 - Fiume loses free port status.[8]
    • June: Austrian emperor visits town.[2]
  • 1898 – October: Flood.[2]
  • 1900 – Population: 38,955.[7]

20th century[edit]

21st century[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Britannica 1910.
  2. ^ a b c d e Haydn 1910.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Leon E. Seltzer, ed. (1952), "Rijeka", Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer of the World, New York: Columbia University Press, p. 1581, OL 6112221M
  4. ^ a b Townsend 1867.
  5. ^ Georg Friedrich Kolb [de] (1862). "Die europäischen Großmächte: Oesterreich". Grundriss der Statistik der Völkerzustands- und Staatenkunde (in German). Leipzig: A. Förstnersche Buchhandlung. Größere Städte ... in CroatienCS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  6. ^ Baedeker 1911.
  7. ^ a b "Hungary: Principal Towns". Statesman's Year-Book. London: Macmillan and Co. 1908 – via HathiTrust.
  8. ^ Chambers 1901.
  9. ^ "Fiume". Statesman's Year-Book. London: Macmillan and Co. 1921 – via HathiTrust.
  10. ^ "Chronology of Catholic Dioceses: Croatia". Norway: Roman Catholic Diocese of Oslo. Retrieved 30 September 2015.
  11. ^ "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 1965. New York: Statistical Office of the United Nations. 1966.
  12. ^ United Nations Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis, Statistics Division (1997). "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". 1995 Demographic Yearbook. New York. pp. 262–321.
  13. ^ 2011 Census, Zagreb: Croatian Bureau of Statistics

This article incorporates information from the Croatian Wikipedia, German Wikipedia, and Italian Wikipedia.

Bibliography[edit]

Published in 19th century[edit]

Published in 20th century[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 45°19′00″N 14°25′00″E / 45.316667°N 14.416667°E / 45.316667; 14.416667