Timeline of Split

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Split, Croatia.

Prior to the 19th century[edit]

Medieval overlords
of Split, 998-1420
980 —
1000 —
1020 —
1040 —
1060 —
1080 —
1100 —
1120 —
1140 —
1160 —
1180 —
1200 —
1220 —
1240 —
1260 —
1280 —
1300 —
1320 —
1340 —
1360 —
1380 —
1400 —
1420 —
1440 —
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Part of a series on the
History of Croatia
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  • 3rd or 2nd century BCE – Split founded as a colony of Issa[3]
  • 78 BCE – Salona taken by Romans.[4]
  • 310 CE – Diocletian's Palace built near Salona.[4]
  • 4th century CE – Diocletianus Aqueduct constructed.
  • 639 – Salona sacked by Avars;[4] refugees settle at nearby Spalatum.
  • 998 – Venetian Doge Pietro Orseolo is granted the title of "Duke of Dalmatia" by the Emperor Basil II (Venice is a nominal vassal of the Byzantine Emperors).[5]
  • 1019 – First Bulgarian Empire destroyed, direct Byzantine rule restored to Split by Basil II (Venice stops using the title "Duke of Dalmatia").
  • 1069 – Split acknowledges nominal suzerainty of Croatian King Peter Krešimir IV.[1][2][6]
  • 1084 – The title of "Duke of Dalmatia" granted once more to Venetian doges by Emperor Alexius I Comnenus, but the town remains under overlordship of King Demetrius Zvonimir.[2]
  • 1091 – Byzantine Emperor Alexius joins the old Theme of Dalmatia to the Empire.[2][7]
  • 1096 – Emperor Alexius grants the administration of Dalmatia to the Doge of Venice.[7]
  • 1100 – Bell tower of the Cathedral of Saint Domnius constructed.
  • 1105 – Split surrenders to King Coloman of Hungary.[4][8]
  • 1116 – Venetian Doge Ordelafo Faliero de Doni retakes the city from Hungary.
  • 1117 – Ordelafo Faliero is defeated and falls in battle with the Hungarians, city submits to Hungary.
  • 1118 – Doge Domenico Michele defeats Stephen II of Hungary and re-establishes Venetian sovereignty
  • 1124 – While Domenico Michele is engaged in battle with Byzantium, Stephen II retakes Split and the other Dalmatian cities.
  • 1125 – Doge Domenico Michele returns and retakes Split and the Dalmatian cities.
  • 1141 – Géza II of Hungary conquers Bosnian lands and re-establishes Hungarian rule in the city.
  • 1171 – Emperor Manuel I Comnenus of the Byzantine Empire restores Imperial control in Split for the last time.
  • 1180 – Death of Manuel I, Hungary re-assumes sovereignty.
  • 1241 – City unsuccessfully besieged by Tartar forces.[5]
  • 1244 – King Bela IV transfers[clarification needed] the election of Dalmatian city governors, that were previously done by cities themselves, to the Ban of Croatia.[9][10]
  • 1327 – Venice reclaims the city.
  • 1357 – Venetian forces expelled from Split, Hungary back in power.
  • 1390 – Tvrtko I of Bosnia in power.[4]
  • 1391 – Death of Tvrtko I, Split returns to Hungarian overlordship.
  • 1420 – City becomes a possession of Venice, and remains under Venetian rule for the following 377 years.[11]
  • 1432 – Loggia built.[12]
  • 1481 – Hrvoja Tower built.[12]
  • 1670 – An outer ring of modern walls is built.[4]
  • 1797 – Split ceded to the Habsburg Monarchy by the Treaty of Campo Formio.[13]

19th century[edit]

20th century[edit]

21st century[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Split, Encyclopædia Britannica
  2. ^ a b c d Novak 2004a, pp. 48–50.
  3. ^ Novak 1957, p. 18.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Britannica 1910.
  5. ^ a b Jackson 1887.
  6. ^ David Luscombe, Jonathan Riley-Smith: The New Cambridge Medieval History IV, c.1024 - c.1198 part II, p. 272
  7. ^ a b Šišić, p. 153.
  8. ^ a b c d Stephen Clissold, ed. (1968). A Short History of Yugoslavia from Early Times to 1966. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-09531-0.
  9. ^ John Van Antwerp Fine: The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, 1991, p. 150–152
  10. ^ Šišić, p. 200.
  11. ^ Eric R. Dursteler, ed. (2013). Companion to Venetian History, 1400-1797. Brill's Companions to European History. Brill. ISBN 978-90-04-25252-3.
  12. ^ a b Baedeker 1905.
  13. ^ Novak 1965, p. 8.
  14. ^ a b Novak 1965, p. 39.
  15. ^ Novak 1965, pp. 47–48.
  16. ^ Novak 1965, pp. 85–86.
  17. ^ Novak 1965, pp. 87–88.
  18. ^ Cölestin Wolfsgruber [de] (1913). "Spalato-Macarsca (Salona)". Catholic Encyclopedia. NY.CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)
  19. ^ Georg Friedrich Kolb [de] (1862). "Die europäischen Großmächte: Oesterreich". Grundriss der Statistik der Völkerzustands- und Staatenkunde (in German). Leipzig: A. Förstnersche Buchhandlung. Größere Städte ... in DalmatienCS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)
  20. ^ Novak 1965, pp. 309–310.
  21. ^ Novak 1965, p. 317.
  22. ^ Novak 1965, p. 321.
  23. ^ Novak 1965, pp. 340–341.
  24. ^ Novak 1965, p. 355.
  25. ^ Novak 1965, p. 364.
  26. ^ "Prirodoslovni muzej i zoološki vrt: O muzeju" (in Croatian). Zagreb: Muzejski dokumentacijski centar. Retrieved 27 December 2013.
  27. ^ Sabrina P. Ramet (2006). The Three Yugoslavias: State-Building and Legitimation, 1918-2005. Indiana University Press. ISBN 0-253-34656-8.
  28. ^ "Galerija umjetnina Split - About Us". Galerija umjetnina Split. Retrieved 2017-01-08.
  29. ^ Don Rubin, ed. (2001). World Encyclopedia of Contemporary Theatre. 1: Europe. Routledge. ISBN 9780415251570.
  30. ^ United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Statistical Office (1976). "Population of capital city and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 1975. New York. pp. 253–279.
  31. ^ United Nations Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis, Statistics Division (1997). "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". 1995 Demographic Yearbook. New York. pp. 262–321.
  32. ^ "Sister Cities of Los Angeles". USA: City of Los Angeles. Retrieved 30 December 2015.
  33. ^ "Croatian Rally Protests U.N. and Demands Early Elections". New York Times. 12 February 2001.
  34. ^ 2011 Census, Zagreb: Croatian Bureau of Statistics, Population in major towns and municipalities

This article incorporates information from the Croatian Wikipedia.

Bibliography[edit]

published in 18th-19th centuries
published in 20th century
published in 21st century

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 43°30′N 16°26′E / 43.500°N 16.433°E / 43.500; 16.433