Timeline of Tripoli

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Tripoli, Libya.

Prior to 19th century[edit]

View of Tripoli in Barbary, 1675
  • 7th century B.C. - Oea founded by Phoenicians.
  • 2nd century B.C. - Romans in power.
  • 163 C.E. - Roman Triumphal Arch built (approximate date).[1]
  • 434 -Taken by Vandals
  • 533- Successful recovered by Byzantines of Egypt
  • 643 - Muslims in power.
  • 1140 - Normans in power in Tripolitania.[1]
  • 1510 - 25 July: Spanish in power.[2]
  • 1530 - Maltese Knights in power in Tripolitania.[1]
  • 1551 - August: City besieged by Ottoman forces led by Sinan Pasha, Turgut Reis, and Murad Agha.[2]
  • 1556 - Cathedral mosque built.[2]
  • 1559 - St. Peter fortress built.[2]
  • 1604 - Iskandar Pasha hammam built.[2]
  • 1610 - Jama'a al-Naqa'a (mosque of the camel) restored.[2]
  • 1654 - Uthman Pasha Madrasa built.[3]
  • 1670 - Sidi Salem (building) restored.[2]
  • 1671 - Darghouth Turkish Bath established.[citation needed]
  • 1675 - Conflict between Barbary corsairs and British naval forces.[4]
  • 1680 - Mosque of Mahmud Khaznadar built.[2][3]
  • 1699 - Mosque of Muhammad Pasha built.[3]
  • 1711 - Ahmed Karamanli in power.
  • 1736 - Ahmad Pasha al-Qarahmanli mosque built.[3]

19th century[edit]

20th century[edit]

21st century[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Tripoli", The Mediterranean, Leipzig: Karl Baedeker, 1911, OCLC 490068 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Ludovico Micara (2008). "Ottoman Tripoli: a Mediterranean Medina". The City in the Islamic World. Leiden: Koninklijke Brill. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f ArchNet.org. "Tripoli". Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA: MIT School of Architecture and Planning. Retrieved 26 January 2013. 
  4. ^ Henry Teonge (1825), The diary of Henry Teonge, chaplain on board His Majesty's ships Assistance, Bristol, and Royal Oak, anno 1675 to 1679, London: Charles Knight 
  5. ^ Jedidiah Morse; Richard C. Morse (1823), "Tripoli", A New Universal Gazetteer (4th ed.), New Haven: S. Converse 
  6. ^ a b Brian L. McLaren (2006), Architecture And Tourism in Italian Colonial Libya, University of Washington Press, ISBN 9780295985428, 0295985429 
  7. ^ Brian L. McLaren (2002). "The Tripoli Trade Fair and the Representation of Italy's African Colonies". Journal of Decorative and Propaganda Arts. 24. 
  8. ^ a b Krystyna von Henneberg (1994). "Tripoli: Piazza Castello and the Making of a Fascist Colonial Capital". In Zeynep Çelik; Diane Favro; Richard Ingersoll. Streets: Critical Perspectives on Public Space. University of California Press. 
  9. ^ a b Mia Fuller (2007), Moderns abroad: architecture, cities, and Italian imperialism, London: Routledge, ISBN 9780415194631, 0415194636 
  10. ^ Il Duce in Libia (in Italian). 1938. 
  11. ^ Charles Burdett (2007), Journeys Through Fascism: Italian Travel-Writing between the Wars, Berghahn Books, ISBN 9781571815408, 1571815406 
  12. ^ a b Robert S. Harrison (1967). "Migrants in the City of Tripoli, Libya". Geographical Review. 57. 
  13. ^ "The State of African Cities 2014". United Nations Human Settlements Programme. ISBN 978-92-1-132598-0. 

This article incorporates information from the Italian Wikipedia.

Further reading[edit]

Published in the 19th century[edit]

Published in the 20th century[edit]