Timeline of Tulsa, Oklahoma

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States.

19th century[edit]

Indian Territory, Eastern part of present-day Oklahoma.
  • 1826 – Creek Indians began to settle town of Tulasi after their expulsion from the Southeastern United States.
  • 1861 – Battle of Chusto-Talasah – Civil War skirmish to north of Tulsa
  • 1878 – First post office established at Perryman ranch.[1]
  • 1882 – Atlantic & Pacific Railroad tracks laid from Vinita.[2]
  • 1884 – Presbyterian church founded a mission day school that became the first public school after Tulsa was incorporated.
  • 1893 – Indian Republican began publication as first newspaper.[3]
  • 1887 – Tulsa founded.[4]
  • 1896 – Town incorporated.[5]
  • 1898
    • Edward E. Calkins becomes first mayor.
    • Population reported as 1,100.
  • 1899
    • First mass said at Holy Family Church.[6]
    • Robert H. Hall built the first telephone system in Tulsa, serving 80 subscribers.
  • 1900
    • Commercial Club of Tulsa formed.[7]
    • Population: 1,390.[4]

20th century[edit]

1900s-1940s[edit]

  • 1901 – Oil discovered at Red Fork, near Tulsa, starting oil boom.[2][5]
  • 1902 – Tulsa chartered as a city.[4]
  • 1903 – Telephone system sold to Indian Territory Telephone Company.
  • 1904
    • Tulsa annexed North Tulsa.[8]
    • First Tulsa bridge built across Arkansas River.
    • Pumping plant built to deliver Arkansas River water to consumers via piping system.[9]
    • Indian Territory Telephone Company bought by Pioneer Company
  • 1905
    • Tulsa World newspaper begins publication.[10]
    • Oil discovered at Glenn Pool near Tulsa.[11]
    • First two public schools built.[12]
  • 1906
text
Downtown Tulsa, looking east on 2nd Street from Main Street, 1908.
  • 1907
  • 1908
    • Commission form of government adopted.[4]
    • Orcutt Lake and Amusement Park, privately owned and developed, opened, advertised as Tulsa's first playground.[15]
A 1909 panoramic view of Tulsa
  • 1909
  • 1910
    • Tulsa County Court House built.[18]
    • Population: 18,182.[4]
    • Exchange National Bank founded after failure of Farmers' National Bank.[19]
    • Texaco builds first oil refinery in West Tulsa.
    • Oil & Gas Journal, oil industry trade journal, headquartered in Tulsa.
    • Area of city: 3.5 square miles.[20]
    • Hotel Brady annex and Tulsa Hotel were built.
  • 1913
  • 1914
  • 1915
  • 1916 – Carnegie library opens, forerunner of the Tulsa Public Library system.[24]
  • 1917 – Orcutt Lake Amusement Park closed and converted to Swan Lake residential area. Gus Orcutt sold his development to Tulsa developer, E. J. Brennan, who coined the name Swan Lake. Brennan donated the lake itself to the City of Tulsa as a public park.[25]
  • 1918
    • Morningside Hospital opened.[13]
    • Cosden Building constructed, considered first "skyscraper" in city.
Map of Tulsa in 1920

1950s-1990s[edit]

21st century[edit]

Tulsa's skyline from Central Park in 2008.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [es/P/PE019.html Henry, Heath C. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Perryman, Josiah Chouteau (1840–1889)."]
  2. ^ a b c Federal Writers' Project 1941, p. 204: "Tulsa"
  3. ^ "Tulsa Gal: Indian Republican Newspaper."
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Britannica 1910.
  5. ^ a b Leon E. Seltzer, ed. (1952), Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer of the World, New York: Columbia University Press, p. 1958, OL 6112221M 
  6. ^ "Holy Family Cathedral School: Tulsa's First Catholic School.
  7. ^ a b Douglas 1921.
  8. ^ Tulsa Preservation Commission. "Urban Development (1901–1945)" Accessed May 5, 2011.
  9. ^ a b City of Tulsa. "Water Supply Lakes - Eucha and Spavinaw Watersheds."
  10. ^ a b "US Newspaper Directory". Chronicling America. Washington DC: Library of Congress. Retrieved March 3, 2014. 
  11. ^ Glenn Pool Oil Field Educational Center. "History of the Oil Boom: The Ida E. Glenn Discovery." Retrieved May 6, 2014.
  12. ^ a b Tulsa Preservation Commission Website. "Tulsa History – Education.(1880–1941)". Retrieved December 28, 2010. [1]
  13. ^ a b c d e f Tulsa County Medical Society. "A History of Tulsa Hospitals" Retrieved December 1, 2012.[2]
  14. ^ a b "Transportation (1850-1945)". Tulsa History. Tulsa Preservation Commission. Retrieved March 3, 2014. 
  15. ^ Debbie Jackson & Hilary Pittman, "Throwback Tulsa: Visitors still flock to Swan Lake, Tulsa's first playground," Tulsa World, June 18, 2015
  16. ^ Field, Eugene. "Growing Together: West Tulsa." Retrieved May 6, 2014.
  17. ^ [3] Tulsa Garden Center. "Woodward Park Complex."] Retrieved December 21, 2011.
  18. ^ "Sketches for Court House and County Jail." The American Contractor. Accessed July 15, 2015.
  19. ^ OKLAHOMA BANKS CLOSED.; New York Times. "State Concern Forced to the Wall by Failure of National Bank."
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h "History of Tulsa Annexation" (PDF). Tulsa City Council. 2004. 
  21. ^ Tulsa Preservation Commission Website. "Tulsa Convention Hall." Archived 2007-02-12 at the Wayback Machine.
  22. ^ Tulsa Preservation Commission Web site. "Holy Family Cathedral, Rectory & School."Accessed September 29. 2010. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-12-01. Retrieved 2010-09-30. 
  23. ^ "Tulsa, Oklahoma". Encyclopedia of Southern Jewish Communities. Jackson, Mississippi: Goldring / Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life. Retrieved March 3, 2014. 
  24. ^ "Library History: Chronology". Research Guides. Tulsa City-County Library. Retrieved March 3, 2014. 
  25. ^ "Living Places: Swan Lake Historic District" 2011. Accessed June 6, 2015.
  26. ^ a b c d e f g Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in the United States: 1790 to 1990, US Census Bureau, 1998 
  27. ^ a b Pluralism Project. "Tulsa, Oklahoma". Directory of Religious Centers. Harvard University. Retrieved March 3, 2014. 
  28. ^ a b "American Association of Community Theatre". Retrieved March 3, 2014. 
  29. ^ a b c d Weaver, Bobby D. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "International Petroleum Exposition." Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  30. ^ a b c "Flood Control and Drainage." City of Tulsa. Retrieved May 25, 2014.
  31. ^ a b Jack Alicoate, ed. (1939), "Standard Broadcasting Stations of the United States: Oklahoma", Radio Annual, New York: Radio Daily, OCLC 2459636 
  32. ^ Vernon N. Kisling, Jr., ed. (2001). "Zoological Gardens of the United States (chronological list)". Zoo and Aquarium History. USA: CRC Press. ISBN 978-1-4200-3924-5. 
  33. ^ a b "Southwest Tulsa on Historic Route 66". Southwesttulsa.org. Retrieved March 3, 2014. 
  34. ^ Tulsa Preservation Commission "Transportation (1850-1945)." Retrieved January 14, 2011.
  35. ^ a b "Spartan Aircraft Company". Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. Oklahoma State University. Archived from the original on October 18, 2010. Retrieved January 25, 2011. 
  36. ^ "Military – Air Force Plant No. 3, Tulsa, OK". Global Security Website. 
  37. ^ AMR Corporation Website. November 2010. Accessed January 26, 2011[permanent dead link]
  38. ^ a b Charles A. Alicoate, ed. (1960), "Television Stations: Oklahoma", Radio Annual and Television Year Book, New York: Radio Daily Corp., OCLC 10512206 
  39. ^ "Movie Theaters in Tulsa, OK". CinemaTreasures.org. Los Angeles: Cinema Treasures LLC. Retrieved March 3, 2014. 
  40. ^ Erwin, Sarah. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Gilcrease Museum."
  41. ^ a b Mike Tigas and Sisi Wei (ed.). "Tulsa, Oklahoma". Nonprofit Explorer. New York: ProPublica. Retrieved March 3, 2014. 
  42. ^ Cantrell, Charles (July 14, 2008). "City and Airport Long Time Partnership Continues". GTR Newspapers. 
  43. ^ Wilson, Linda D. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Oral Roberts University." Archived 2010-03-12 at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  44. ^ Tulsa City-County Library- Central Library Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  45. ^ Laurie Winslow, "Bank of Oklahoma celebrates 100 years", Tulsa World, November 15, 2010.
  46. ^ Taylor, Jonathan (November 2008). "The Lost Twin: The Lone, Shrunken World Trade Center Tower in Oklahoma". The Believer. 
  47. ^ "Oklahoma". Official Congressional Directory. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1983. 
  48. ^ a b Marlin Lavanhar (2007). "Tulsa: a Divinely Inspired City". In Davis D. Joyce. Alternative Oklahoma: Contrarian Views of the Sooner State. University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 978-0-8061-3819-0. 
  49. ^ "Oklahoma Food Banks". Food Bank Locator. Chicago: Feeding America. Retrieved March 3, 2014. 
  50. ^ "Oklahoma". Official Congressional Directory. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1989. 
  51. ^ "History of the Tulsa Preservation Commission". Tulsa Preservation Commission. Retrieved March 3, 2014. 
  52. ^ "Tulsa Air and Space Museum". Yelp. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  53. ^ "Welcome to the City of Tulsa Online". Archived from the original on February 2001 – via Internet Archive, Wayback Machine. 
  54. ^ "Tulsa (city), Oklahoma". State & County QuickFacts. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on March 22, 2009. 
  55. ^ Shannon Muchmore, Mutually beneficial Museum's attendance, fundraising up, Tulsa World, July 5, 2009.
  56. ^ "Oklahoma". CJR's Guide to Online News Startups. New York: Columbia Journalism Review. Retrieved March 3, 2014. 
  57. ^ a b "Tulsa (city), Oklahoma". State & County QuickFacts. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on March 22, 2009. Retrieved March 3, 2014. 
  58. ^ Civic Impulse, LLC. "Members of Congress". GovTrack. Washington, D.C. Retrieved March 3, 2014. 
  59. ^ "Helmerich Center for American Research at Gilcrease Museum." Hastings+Chivetta . 2016 Accessed November 3, 2016.
  60. ^ Lohman, Rich. "Oklahoma Defenders go dormant." Tulsa Today. Accessed July 15, 2015.
  61. ^ Federal Writers' Project 1941, p. 415: "Chronology"

Bibliography[edit]

Published in 20th century[edit]

Published in 21st century[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 36°07′53″N 95°56′14″W / 36.131389°N 95.937222°W / 36.131389; -95.937222