Timeline of college football in Kansas

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This timeline of college football in Kansas sets forth notable college football-related events that occurred in the state of Kansas.

Overview[edit]

College football in Kansas began in 1890 and has its roots in the formation of the Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference.[1] The first game was played on November 22 that year between Baker University and the University of Kansas.[2] Games have been played in the state continuously every year ever since.

Timeline[edit]

Note: this timeline is incomplete. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

1890s[edit]

1900s[edit]

1910s[edit]

  • 1911
    • October 21 – Kansas beats Kansas State 6–0. After the teams did not play in 1910, this is the first game in a continuous series that has lasted more than 100 years – the sixth-longest continuous series in college football history.
    • November 25 – Over 1,000 people gather in downtown Lawrence to watch a live scale model reenactment of the Kansas Jayhawks game against Missouri. Game statistics were transmitted by telegraph.
  • 1913
    • Kansas State formally leaves the Kansas Intercollegiate Athletic Association to join the Missouri Valley and compete against the University of Kansas and other larger schools in the region.

1920s[edit]

  • 1928
    • December 1 – The former Kansas Intercollegiate Athletic Conference disbanded to form the Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference ("little six").[citation needed]

1930s[edit]

  • 1939
    • October 28 – Kansas State's homecoming game against Nebraska is broadcast on W9XAK television. This is the first college football game broadcast in Kansas and the second anywhere in the nation.

1940s[edit]

  • 1948
    • January 1 – Both Wichita State and Kansas play in bowl games on the same date – the first bowl appearances for any of the state's schools. Wichita State plays in the Raisin Bowl, while KU plays in the Orange Bowl. After the season ends, WSU's head coach Ralph Graham leaves to coach at his alma mater, Kansas State, which is at the time in the midst of an NCAA-record 28-game losing streak.
  • 1949
    • September 24 – Harold Robinson plays his first game for Kansas State, breaking the modern "color barrier" in Big Eight Conference athletics, and also becoming the first ever African-American athlete on scholarship in the conference.[8]

1950s[edit]

1960s[edit]

1970s[edit]

1980s[edit]

  • 1980
    • November 20 – The first Sunflower Bowl is played.
    • November 21 – The final Boot Hill Bowl game is played.
  • 1986
    • November 15 – The final Sunflower Bowl is played.
    • December 2 – Wichita State University discontinues its football program.

1990s[edit]

  • 1992
    • Saint Mary of the Plains closes.
  • 1995
    • October 28 – Kansas State and Kansas face each other as ranked football teams for the first time. KU comes into the game ranked #6 in the nation in the AP Poll, while KSU is ranked #14. KSU wins the game, 41–7.
    • The Wheat Bowl plays its first game.
  • 1996
  • 1998

2000s[edit]

  • 2001
    • Former Kansas tackle/halfback and former head coach at Kansas, Washburn and Haskell John H. Outland is inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.[15]
  • 2002
    • Former Wichita State head coach Marcelino Huerta is inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.[16]
  • 2004
    • Charlie Richard, former head coach at Baker University, is inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame
  • 2006
    • The final Wheat Bowl game is played.
  • 2009

2010s[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics "Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference"
  2. ^ a b c d e f Evans, Harold (August 1940). "College Football in Kansas". Kansas Historical Quarterly. pp. 285–311. Retrieved September 11, 2012. 
  3. ^ http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/blackhistory2008/columns/story?id=3254974
  4. ^ "(unknown title)". The Manhattan Mercury. December 6, 1893. 
  5. ^ http://www.mmbolding.com/Olyball/Olympic_Football.htm
  6. ^ DeLassus, David. "Wichita State Yearly Results (1905)". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved April 4, 2011. 
  7. ^ "New Football Rules Tested". Los Angeles Times. December 26, 1905. 
  8. ^ "Athlete Who Broke Big 12 Race Barrier Dies". CBS College Sports. May 13, 2006. Retrieved 2010-03-17. 
  9. ^ "Bennie Owen". National Football Foundation. Retrieved September 26, 2015. 
  10. ^ "Fielding "Hurry Up" Yost". National Football Foundation. Retrieved September 26, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Matty "Moanin' Matty" Bell". National Football Foundation. Retrieved September 26, 2015. 
  12. ^ "Lynn "Pappy" Waldorf". National Football Foundation. Retrieved September 26, 2015. 
  13. ^ "Charlie Bachman". National Football Foundation. Retrieved September 26, 2015. 
  14. ^ a b "Willie Jeffries". National Football Foundation. Retrieved September 26, 2015. 
  15. ^ "John Outland". National Football Foundation. Retrieved September 24, 2015. 
  16. ^ "Marcelino "Chelo" Huerta". National Football Foundation. Retrieved September 26, 2015. 
  17. ^ "Ted Kessinger". National Football Foundation. Retrieved September 26, 2015. 
  18. ^ "William "Lone Star" Dietz". National Football Foundation. Retrieved September 26, 2015. 
  19. ^ "Bill Snyder". College Football Hall of Fame. January 9, 2015. Retrieved July 1, 2015. 
  20. ^ "Haskell suspends football program, possibly others, to cut costs". Lawrence Journal-World. May 21, 2015. Retrieved December 6, 2016.