Timeline of the 2001 Atlantic hurricane season

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Track map of all Atlantic tropical cyclones in 2001

The 2001 Atlantic hurricane season was an average Atlantic hurricane season in which fifteen named storms formed.[nb 1] Although Tropical Storm Allison formed on June 5, the season officially began on June 1 and ended on November 30, dates that conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones develop in the Atlantic basin.[2][3] The season's final storm, Hurricane Olga, dissipated on December 6.[4]

The season produced seventeen tropical depressions, of which fifteen intensified into tropical storms, nine became hurricanes, and four became major hurricanes.[nb 2] The two most significant storms of the season, in terms of loss of life and damage, were Tropical Storm Allison and Hurricane Michelle. Tropical Storm Allison was an early season tropical storm that brought devastating rainfall to much of the Gulf Coast of the United States. The storm became the only storm in recorded history to have its name retired by the World Meteorological Organization.[2] Hurricane Michelle was the strongest hurricane during the season, with winds reaching 140 mph (220 km/h), Category 4 hurricane status on the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Michelle produced torrential rainfall across much of Central America and Cuba before moving through the Bahamas and dissipating on November 6.[6]

This timeline includes information that was not operationally released, meaning that data from post-storm reviews by the National Hurricane Center, such as a storm that was not operationally warned upon, has been included. This timeline documents tropical cyclone formations, strengthening, weakening, landfalls, extratropical transitions, and dissipations during the season.

Timeline of events[edit]

Hurricane Olga (2001) Hurricane Noel (2001) Hurricane Michelle Tropical Storm Lorenzo (2001) Hurricane Karen (2001) Tropical Storm Jerry (2001) Hurricane Iris List of storms in the 2001 Atlantic hurricane season#Hurricane Humberto List of storms in the 2001 Atlantic hurricane season#Tropical Depression Nine Hurricane Gabrielle (2001) List of storms in the 2001 Atlantic hurricane season#Hurricane Felix Hurricane Erin (2001) Tropical Storm Dean (2001) Tropical Storm Chantal (2001) Tropical Storm Barry (2001) List of storms in the 2001 Atlantic hurricane season#Tropical Depression Two Tropical Storm Allison Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale

June[edit]

June 1
  • 0400 UTC (12:00 a.m. EDT) – The 2001 Atlantic hurricane season officially begins.[3]
June 5
Tropical Storm Allison near peak intensity on June 5, 2001
June 6
  • 0600 UTC (1:00 a.m. CDT) – Tropical Storm Allison weakens to a tropical depression over southeastern Texas.[2]
June 10
June 11
  • 0200 UTC (9:00 p.m. CDT) – Subtropical Depression Allison makes a second and final landfall near Morgan City, Louisiana with winds of 35 mph (55 km/h).[2]
  • 0600 UTC (1:00 a.m. CDT) – Subtropical Depression Allison intensifies into Subtropical Storm Allison.[2]
  • 1200 UTC (7:00 a.m. CDT) – Subtropical Storm Allison reaches its peak intensity with a minimum barometric pressure of 1000 mbar (hPa; 29.53 inHg).[2]
June 12
  • 0000 UTC (7:00 p.m. CDT June 11) – Subtropical Storm Allison weakens to a subtropical depression.[2]
June 17
  • 1200 UTC (7:00 a.m. CDT) – Subtropical Depression Allison re-intensifies into Subtropical Storm Allison.[2]
June 18
  • 0000 UTC (7:00 p.m. CDT June 17) – Subtropical Depression Allison merges with a cold front, becoming an extratropical low pressure system.[2]
June 19
  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.m. AST) – The remnants of Subtropical Depression Allison dissipate southeast of Nova Scotia.[2]

July[edit]

July 11
July 12
  • 0000 UTC (8:00 p.m. AST July 11) – Tropical Depression Two reaches its peak intensity with winds of 30 mph (45 km/h) and a minimum barometric pressure of 1010 mbar (hPa; 29.82 inHg).[7]
July 13
  • 0000 UTC (8:00 p.m. AST July 11) – Tropical Depression Two dissipates roughly 600 mi (970 km) east of the Windward Islands.[7]

August[edit]

August 2
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Depression Three develops from an area of low pressure roughly 175 mi (280 km) west-northwest of Key West, Florida.[8]
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. EDT) – Tropical Depression Three intensifies into Tropical Storm Barry.[8]
August 4
  • 0000 UTC (8:00 p.m. EDT August 3) – Tropical Storm Barry weakens to a tropical depression over the eastern Gulf of Mexico.[8]
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. EDT) – Tropical Depression Barry re-intensifies into Tropical Storm Barry.[8]
August 5
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Storm Barry reaches its peak intensity with winds of 70 mph (110 km/h) and a minimum barometric pressure of 990 mbar (hPa; 29.23 inHg).[8]
August 6
  • 0500 UTC (1:00 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Storm Barry makes landfall at Santa Rosa Beach, Florida with winds of 70 mph (110 km/h).[8]
  • 1200 UTC (7:00 a.m. CDT) – Tropical Storm Barry weakens to tropical depression status for a second time over southeastern Alabama.[8]
August 7
August 14
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. AST) – Tropical Depression Four develops from an area of low pressure roughly 1300 mi (2100 km) east of the southern Windward Islands.[9]
August 16
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. AST) – Tropical Depression Four degenerates into a tropical wave.[9]
August 17
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. AST) – The remnants of Tropical Depression Four regenerate into Tropical Storm Chantal, skipping tropical depression status, roughly 250 mi (400 km) south of Saint Croix.[9]
August 19
  • 0600 UTC (1:00 a.m. CDT) – Tropical Storm Chantal reaches its peak intensity with winds of 70 mph (110 km/h) and a minimum barometric pressure of 997 mbar (hPa; 29.44 inHg).[9]
August 21
  • 0200 UTC (9:00 p.m. CDT August 2) – Tropical Storm Chantal makes landfall near the Mexico–Belize border with winds of 70 mph (110 km/h).[9]
August 22
  • 0000 UTC (7:00 p.m. CDT August 21) – Tropical Storm Chantal weakens to a tropical depression.[9]
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. AST) – Tropical Storm Dean develops from an area of low pressure near Saint Croix.[10]
  • 1800 UTC (1:00 p.m. CDT) – Tropical Depression Chantal dissipates over the Mexican state of Tabasco.[10]
August 23
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. AST) – Tropical Storm Dean weakens to a tropical depression north of the Dominican Republic.[10]
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. AST) – Tropical Depression Dean degenerates into a tropical wave.[9]
August 26
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. AST) – The remnants of Tropical Storm Dean regenerate into a tropical depression.[10]
August 27
  • 0000 UTC (8:00 p.m. AST August 26) – Tropical Depression Dean re-intensifies into Tropical Storm Dean.[10]
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. AST) – Tropical Storm Dean reaches its peak intensity with winds of 70 mph (110 km/h) and a minimum barometric pressure of 994 mbar (hPa; 29.35 inHg).[10]
August 28
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. AST) – Tropical Storm Dean transitions into an extratropical cyclone east-southeast of Newfoundland.[10]
August 29
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. AST) – The extratropical remnants of Tropical Storm Dean are absorbed within a larger extratropical low.[10]

September[edit]

September 1
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. AST) – Tropical Depression Six develops from an area of low pressure roughly 600 mi (970 km) west-southwest of the Cape Verde Islands.
September 2
  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.m. AST) – Tropical Depression Six intensifies into Tropical Storm Erin.
September 5
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. AST) – Tropical Storm Erin degenerates into a non-convective remnant area of low pressure.
September 6
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. AST) – The remnants of Tropical Storm Erin regenerate into a tropical depression roughly 550 mi (890 km) northeast of the northern Leeward Islands.
September 7
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. AST) – Tropical Depression Seven develops from an area of low pressure roughly 360 mi (580 km) southwest of the Cape Verde Islands.
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. AST) – Tropical Depression Six re-intensifies into Tropical Storm Erin.
September 8
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. AST) – Tropical Depression Seven degenerates into a tropical wave roughly 650 mi (1050 km) west-southwest of the Cape Verde Islands.
September 9
  • 0000 UTC (8:00 p.m. AST September 8) – Tropical Storm Erin intensifies into a Category 1 hurricane.
  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.m. AST) – Hurricane Erin intensifies into a Category 2 hurricane.
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. AST) – Hurricane Erin intensifies into a Category 3 hurricane and reaches its peak intensity with winds of 120 mph (195 km/h) and a minimum barometric pressure of 968 mbar (hPa; 28.59 inHg).
September 10
  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.m. AST) – The remnants of Tropical Depression Seven regenerate into a tropical depression.
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. AST) – Hurricane Erin weakens to a Category 2 hurricane.
September 11
  • 0000 UTC (8:00 p.m. AST September 10) – Hurricane Erin weakens to a Category 1 hurricane.
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. AST) – Tropical Depression Seven intensifies into Tropical Storm Felix.
September 13
  • 0000 UTC (8:00 p.m. AST September 12) – Tropical Storm Felix intensifies into a Category 1 hurricane.
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. AST) – Hurricane Felix intensifies into a Category 2 hurricane.
September 14
  • 0000 UTC (8:00 p.m. AST) – Hurricane Felix intensifies into a Category 3 hurricane and reaches its peak intensity with winds of 115 mph (185 km/h) and a minimum barometric pressure of 962 mbar (hPa; 28.41 inHg) roughly 1400 mi (2300 km) southwest of the Azore Islands.
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. AST) – Hurricane Felix weakens to a Category 2 hurricane.
September 15
  • 0000 UTC (8:00 p.m. AST September 14) – Hurricane Erin weakens to a tropical storm.
  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.m. AST) – Tropical Storm Erin transitions into an extratropical cyclone.
September 16
  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.m. AST) – Hurricane Felix weakens to a Category 1 hurricane.
September 17
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. AST) – Hurricane Felix weakens to a tropical storm roughly 350 mi (560 km) southwest of the Azore Islands.
September 18
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. AST) – Tropical Storm Felix weakens to a tropical depression.
September 19
  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.m. AST) – Tropical Depression Felix dissipates roughly 400 mi (640 km) southwest of the Azore Islands.
September 16
  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.m. AST) – Hurricane Felix weakens to a Category 1 hurricane.
September 17
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. AST) – Hurricane Felix weakens to a tropical storm roughly 350 mi (560 km) southwest of the Azore Islands.
September 18
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. AST) – Tropical Storm Felix weakens to a tropical depression.
September 19
  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.m. AST) – Tropical Depression Felix dissipates roughly 400 mi (640 km) southwest of the Azore Islands.

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ An average season, as defined by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, has twelve tropical storms, six hurricanes and two major hurricanes.[1]
  2. ^ A major hurricane is a storm that ranks as Category 3 or higher on the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Climate Prediction Center Internet Team (August 4, 2011). "Background Information: The North Atlantic Hurricane Season". Climate Prediction Center. Retrieved December 27, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Stacy R. Stewart (November 28, 2001). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Allison (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved December 27, 2011. 
  3. ^ a b Chris Landsea; Neal Dorst (ed.) (June 2, 2011). "G: Tropical Cyclone Climatology". Hurricane Research Division: Frequently Asked Questions. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory. G1) When is hurricane season ?. Retrieved December 27, 2011. 
  4. ^ Lixion A. Avila (December 17, 2001). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Olga (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved December 27, 2011. 
  5. ^ Chris Landsea; Neal Dorst (ed.) (June 2, 2011). "A: Basic Definitions". Hurricane Research Division: Frequently Asked Questions. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory. A3) What is a super-typhoon? What is a major hurricane ? What is an intense hurricane ? . Retrieved December 27, 2011. 
  6. ^ Jack Beven (January 23, 2002). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Michelle (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved December 27, 2011. 
  7. ^ a b c Miles B. Lawrence (July 23, 2001). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Depression Two (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved December 28, 2011. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h Jack Beven (November 20, 2001). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Barry (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved December 29, 2011. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f g James L. Franklin (September 6, 2001). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Chantal (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved December 29, 2011. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h Lixion A. Avila (October 3, 2001). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Dean (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved December 29, 2011. 

External links[edit]