Timeline of the COVID-19 pandemic

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The timeline of the COVID-19 pandemic lists the articles containing the chronology and epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2,[1] the virus that causes the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic.

The first human cases of COVID-19 were identified in Wuhan, People's Republic of China, in December 2019.[2] The World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on 30 January 2020, and a pandemic on 11 March 2020.[3][4][5] At the current stage of the pandemic (January 2022), it is not possible to conclusively determine precisely how humans in mainland China were initially or previously infected with the virus, called SARS-CoV-2.[6] Furthermore, some developments may become known or fully understood only in retrospect.

Desc-i.svg
Interactive map of confirmed COVID-19 cases per million people.

Click the play button in the top left to interact with the map.

On mobile devices you will need to use landscape mode (rotate the phone) and drag the slider at the top of the infographic.

In November 2020, the United States became the first country to have at least ten million confirmed cases. In December 2020, India became the second country to have at least ten million confirmed cases. In February 2021, Brazil became the third country to have at least ten million confirmed cases. In November 2021, the United Kingdom became the fourth country to have at least ten million confirmed cases. In December 2021, Russia became the fifth country to have at least ten million confirmed cases. At the beginning of 2022, France joined the list of countries with at least ten million confirmed cases. More than a week later, Turkey joined the list of countries with at least ten million confirmed cases. The United States was also the only country to have at least ten million confirmed cases in November and December 2020. As of January 2022, seven countries have at least ten million confirmed cases, incl. the United States, India, Brazil, the United Kingdom, France, Russia and Turkey.

In December 2019 and January 2020, China was the only country to have at least one confirmed case. The United States and India became first two countries with at least ten million confirmed cases in late 2020. Brazil, the United Kingdom and Russia joined the list of countries with at least ten million confirmed cases in 2021. France and Turkey later joined the list of countries with at least ten million confirmed cases. Italy and Spain are two countries on track to join the list of countries with at least ten million confirmed cases.

Worldwide timelines by month and year[edit]

The 2019 and January 2020 timeline articles include the initial responses as subsections, and more comprehensive timelines by nation-state are listed below this section.

The following are the timelines of the COVID-19 pandemic respectively in:

Responses

The following are responses to the COVID-19 pandemic respectively in:

Timeline by country[edit]

Some of the timelines listed below also contain responses. The following are the timeline of the COVID-19 pandemic in:

Worldwide cases by month and year[edit]

The following are COVID-19 pandemic cases in:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Coronavirus". www.who.int. Retrieved 27 January 2020.
  2. ^ Page, Jeremy; Hinshaw, Drew; McKay, Betsy (26 February 2021). "In Hunt for Covid-19 Origin, Patient Zero Points to Second Wuhan Market - The man with the first confirmed infection of the new coronavirus told the WHO team that his parents had shopped there". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  3. ^ "Statement on the second meeting of the International Health Regulations (2005) Emergency Committee regarding the outbreak of novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV)". World Health Organization (WHO). 30 January 2020. Archived from the original on 31 January 2020. Retrieved 30 January 2020.
  4. ^ "WHO Director-General's opening remarks at the media briefing on COVID-19—11 March 2020". World Health Organization. 11 March 2020. Retrieved 11 March 2020.
  5. ^ Ramin Zibaseresht (14 April 2020). "How to Respond to the Ongoing Pandemic Outbreak of the Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19)". European Journal of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Retrieved 14 April 2020.
  6. ^ WHO. "Q&A on coronaviruses (COVID-19)". World Health Organization. Retrieved 6 April 2020.

External links[edit]