Timeline of the 2020 United States presidential election

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United States presidential election, 2020 timeline

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The following is a timeline of major events leading up, during, and after the United States presidential election of 2020. President Donald Trump of the Republican Party, who was elected in 2016, is seeking reelection to a second term.

The election is the 59th quadrennial United States presidential election and is scheduled to be held on November 3, 2020. The presidential primaries and caucuses are scheduled to be held between February and June, 2020, staggered among the 50 states, Washington, D.C., and U.S. territories. The U.S. Congress is scheduled to certify the electoral result on January 5, 2021, and the new or incumbent President and Vice President are planned to be inaugurated on January 20, 2021.

2017[edit]

  • February 17: Republican incumbent President Donald Trump formally announces his candidacy for a second term.[1]
  • July 28: Representative John Delaney of Maryland announces candidacy for the nomination of the Democratic Party.[2]
  • November 6: Tech entrepreneur Andrew Yang of New York announces his candidacy for the nomination of the Democratic Party.[3]

2018[edit]

  • July 18: Charlotte, North Carolina is chosen as the site for the 2020 Republican National Convention[4]
  • August 25: Democratic Party officials and television networks begin discussions as to the nature and scheduling of the following year's debates and the nomination process.[5] Changes were made to the role of superdelegates, deciding to only allow them to vote on the first ballot if the nomination is uncontested[6]
  • November 7: President Trump confirms that Mike Pence will remain vice presidential pick[7]
  • November 11: West Virginia State Senator Richard Ojeda announces candidacy for the nomination of the Democratic Party. He ultimately became the first candidate to withdraw from the race, suspending his campaign a year before the Iowa caucus.[8]
  • December 12: Former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julian Castro forms a presidential exploratory committee for a possible run for the nomination of the Democratic Party[9]
  • December 31: Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts forms an exploratory committee for a possible run for the nomination of the Democratic Party.[10] She would ultimately decide to commit to an official campaign in February 2019 (see below).

2019[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

  • February 1: On Twitter, Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey announces his candidacy for the nomination of the Democratic Party[22]
  • February 9: Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts announces her candidacy for the nomination of the Democratic Party, soon after forming an exploratory committee.[23]
  • February 10: Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota announces her candidacy for the nomination of the Democratic Party[24]
  • February 12: The first mass-rally of the Trump campaign of the year takes place in El Paso, Texas. A counter-rally led by former Democratic U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke of Texas takes place less than a mile away.[25] O’Rourke would later enter the race in March for the Democratic nomination (see below).
  • February 13-15: Winter meeting of the Democratic National Committee, in which the rules of the upcoming primary are promulgated[26]
  • February 15: Former Massachusetts Governor Bill Weld announces the formation of an exploratory committee, becoming Trump's first official challenger in the Republican primaries[27]
  • February 19: Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont announces his candidacy for the nomination of the Democratic Party[28]

March[edit]

  • March 1: Governor Jay Inslee of Washington announces his candidacy for the nomination of the Democratic Party[29]
  • March 4: Former governor John Hickenlooper of Colorado announces his candidacy for the nomination of the Democratic Party[30]
  • March 5:
  • March 10: Presidential Forum at South by Southwest,[33] the first so-called "cattle call" event of the cycle.
  • March 13: Wayne Messam, the Democratic mayor of Miramar, Florida, announces the formation of an exploritory committee[34]
  • March 14: O'Rourke officially announces his candidacy for the nomination of the Democratic Party[35]
  • March 17: Gillibrand officially announces her candidacy for the nomination of the Democratic Party,[36] having previously formed an exploratory committee two month earlier (see above).
  • March 28: Messam formally announces his candidacy for the nomination of the Democratic Party.[37]

April[edit]

May[edit]

  • May 2: Senator Michael Bennet of Colorado announces his candidacy for the nomination of the Democratic Party[48]
  • May 14: Governor Steve Bullock of Montana announces his candidacy for the nomination of the Democratic Party.[49]
  • May 16: New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announces his candidacy for the nomination of the Democratic Party.[50]

June[edit]

  • June 26–27: The Democratic debate series commences with a two-night debate in Miami, hosted by NBC and broadcast on its networks.[51][52]

July[edit]

  • July 30–31: The second Democratic debate is scheduled to be held in Detroit, airing on CNN.[53]

September[edit]

  • September TBD: The third Democratic debate will take place. Specific dates and location TBA.[54]

October[edit]

  • October TBD: The fourth Democratic debate will take place. Specific dates and location TBA.[54]

November[edit]

  • November TBD: The fifth Democratic debate will take place. Specific dates and location TBA.[54]

December[edit]

  • December TBD: The sixth Democratic debate will take place. Specific dates and location TBA.[54]

2020[edit]

The following anticipated primary and caucus dates are accurate as of April 2019, but may change depending on legislation passed before the scheduled primary dates. Several states have not yet scheduled their respective primaries or caucuses.[55]

February[edit]

March[edit]

  • TBD: Colorado caucuses (March 3, 10, or 17)[55]
  • March 3: Super Tuesday: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and Virginia primaries.[55]
  • March 3–10: Democrats Abroad primary[55]
  • March 7: Louisiana primary[55]
  • March 8:
    • Puerto Rico Republican primary[55]
    • Maine Democratic caucuses[55]
  • March 10:
    • Hawaii Republican caucuses
    • North Dakota Democratic firehouse caucuses
    • Idaho, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, and Washington primaries[55]
  • March 17: Arizona, Florida, and Illinois primaries[55]

April[edit]

  • April 4: Alaska and Hawaii Democratic caucuses[55]
  • April 7: Wisconsin primary[55]
  • April 28: Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island primaries[55]

May[edit]

June[edit]

  • June 2: Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, and South Dakota primaries[55]
  • June 7: Puerto Rico Democratic primary[55]
  • June 16: Washington, D.C. Democratic primary[55]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

2021[edit]

January[edit]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ Fritze, John (July 28, 2017). "Delaney announces campaign for president, becomes first to challenge Trump". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved December 11, 2018.
  3. ^ Hunter, Schwarz (February 13, 2019). "Here's how 2020 Democrats announced their campaigns". CNN.
  4. ^ Morill, Jim (July 20, 2018). "GOP picks Charlotte for 2020 convention. Now, the fundraising and organizing begin". The Charlotte Observer. Retrieved July 24, 2018.
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