Timeline of women in Antarctica

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The first women at the South Pole on 12 November 1969 were Pam Young, Jean Pearson, Lois Jones, Eileen McSaveney, Kay Lindsay and Terry Tickhill. Rear Admiral D.F. Welch is in the middle.

This is a Timeline of women in Antarctica. This article describes many of the firsts and accomplishments that women from various countries have accomplished in different fields of endeavor on the continent of Antarctica.

650s[edit]

650

1770s[edit]

1773

1776-1777

1830s[edit]

1833

  • First written account about sub-Antarctic travel from a woman's perspective is written by Abby Jane Morrell.[1]

1839

  • An unnamed female castaway who later traveled on the Eliza Scott and Sabrina journeyed "within sight of the continent."[1]

1930s[edit]

1931

  • Norwegian Ingrid Christensen and her companion, Mathilde Wegger, were the first recorded women to see Antarctica.[3]

1935

1937

  • Christensen landed at Scullin Monolith, becoming the first woman to set foot on the Antarctic mainland, followed by her daughter, Augusta Sofie Christensen, and two other women: Lillemor Rachlew, and Solveig Widerøeher.[5][6][7]

1940s[edit]

1947

1947-1948

1950s[edit]

1956

  • Geologist Maria Klenova of the Soviet Union was the first woman to begin scientific work in Antarctica.[11] Klenova helped create the first Antarctic atlas.[12]
  • Jennie Darlington publishes her book about spending a year in Antarctica called My Antarctic Honeymoon.[13]

1957

1959

1959-1960

1960s[edit]

The first female Argentinian scientists in Antarctica during 1968

1960

  • Artist Nel Law is the first Australian women to set foot in Antarctica, landing at Mawson and visiting in an unofficial capacity.[16]

1968

1969

  • First team of women scientists from the United States, led by Lois Jones, works on Antarctica.[11]
  • First group of women to reach the pole were Pam Young, Jean Pearson, Lois Jones, Eileen McSaveney, Kay Lindsay and Terry Tickhill.[19] The women stepped off of the C-130 ramp at the same time.[20]
  • Christine Müller-Schwarze is the first American woman to do scientific research on the continent of Antarctica.[10]

1970s[edit]

1970

  • Engineer Irene C. Peden is the first United States woman to work in the interior of Antarctica.[21]

1971

  • New Zealand limnologist Ann Chapman leads a biological survey of frozen lakes in the Taylor Valley, becoming the first woman to lead an Antarctic expedition.[22]

1974

1974-1975

  • First women civilian contractors on Antarctica were Elena Marty and Jan Boyd.[10]

1975

1975-1976

  • Mary Alice McWhinnie is the first woman scientist to work at Palmer Station.[10]
  • The first three Australian women to visit the continent of Antarctica in an official capacity -Elizabeth Chipman, Jutta Hösel and Shelagh Robinson visit Casey station for the summer.[25]

1976

  • Dr Zoe Gardner becomes the first woman to overwinter with the Australian Antarctic program as a medical officer on sub-Antarctic Macquarie Island.[26]

1977

  • Meher Moos becomes the first Indian woman to visit Antarctica.[27]

1978

  • Silvia Morello de Palma of Argentina is the first woman to give birth on Antarctica on January 7.[28]
  • Margaret Winslow of the United States is the first woman to lead an expedition to Livingston Island, Antarctica

1979

  • First year the United States Navy advertises for "qualified female volunteers to over-winter in Antarctica."[29]

1978-1979

  • Michele Eileen Raney is the first woman physician to work year-round on Antarctica. She was also the first woman to winter at the South Pole.[10]

1980s[edit]

1981

  • Dr Louise Holliday is the first woman to overwinter in Antarctica for the Australian Antarctic program serving as medical officer at Davis station.[26]

1983

1984

1985

  • First woman married at the South Pole is Patricia Manglicmot to Randall Chambers.[9]
  • The first women to winter-over at Palmer Station were Ann Wylette and Becky Heimark.[10]
  • Thea de Moel is the first Dutch woman to reach Antarctica as a crew member aboard the ‘Footsteps of Scott Expedition’ ship ‘Southern Quest’.

1986

1987

  • Elizabeth Chipman publishes Women on the Ice: A History of Women in the Far South.[13]

1988

1987-1988

1988-1989

  • Alison J. Clifton commands the Macquarie Island station, becoming the first woman to lead a sub-Antarctic base.[37]

1989

1989-1990

1990s[edit]

In-Young Ahn at King Sejong Station in 2015; she led this station in 1991

1990-1991

1991

1992

1993

  • Ann Bancroft leads the first all-woman expedition to the South Pole and becomes the first woman to reach both the South and North Pole.[37]

1994

1996

1996-1997

1997-1998

  • Four Ukrainian women visited Antarctica and Ukrainian research station Vernadsky Research Base as part of the 2nd country's Antarctic expedition: geophysicist Maryna Orlova, meteorologists Svitlana Krakovska and Lyudmyla Mankivska, and cook Galyna Kolotnytska.[46]

2000s[edit]

2000

  • Zhao Ping and Lin Qing are the first Chinese women to over-winter at Antarctica.[47]
  • Fiona Thornewill and Catharine Hartley become the first British women to walk to the South Pole on foot.
  • Caroline Hamilton and four other women become the first British women to ski to the South Pole as an all-women expedition.[48]

2001

2003

  • Lynne Cox swims more than mile in Antarctic waters.[49]
  • US Coast Guard pilot Sidonie Bosin is the first female aviation officer in charge of air crews in the Antarctic.[50]

2004

  • Linda Beilharz is the first Australian woman to ski to the South Pole.[51]
  • Jackie Ronne publishes her memoirs about her year in Antarctica called Antarctica's First Lady: Memoirs of the First American Woman to Set Foot on the Antarctic Continent and Winter-Over as a Member of a Pioneering Expedition.[13]

2005

2006

2007

  • Clare O'Leary is the first Irish woman to reach the South Pole.[57]
  • Sarah Ames of Germany is the first woman to complete a marathon on all seven continents.[58]

2008

  • Sumiyo Tsuzuki is the first Japanese woman to reach the South Pole.[59]

2009

2010s[edit]

Felicity Ashton in Antarctica

2010

2011

2012

  • Felicity Ashton of the United Kingdom is the first person to ski alone across Antarctica, using only her own muscle power. She is also the first woman to cross Antarctica alone.[67]
  • The first woman to climb Mount Sidley was sixteen year old Romanian Crina Coco Popescu.[68]
  • Zeena Al Towayya is the first Omani woman, and Sahar Al Shamrani is the first Saudi woman to travel to Antarctica.[69]

2014

2013

  • On December 27, 2013 Maria Leijerstam from the United Kingdom became the first person in the world to cycle to the South Pole from the edge of the Antarctic Continent.

2016

  • First large (78 member) all-women expedition, Homeward Bound, goes to Antarctica.[71]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Hulbe, Wang & Ommanney 2010, p. 947.
  2. ^ Roldan, Gabriela (2010). "Changes in the Contributions of Women to Antarctic National Programmes" (PDF). PCAS 13 Review. hdl:10092/13909. Retrieved 30 August 2016.
  3. ^ Blackadder 2015, p. 172.
  4. ^ "Women in Antarctica: Sharing this Life-Changing Experience", transcript of speech by Robin Burns, given at the 4th Annual Phillip Law Lecture; Hobart, Tasmania, Australia; 18 June 2005. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  5. ^ "The first woman in Antarctica". www.antarctica.gov.au. Australian Antarctic Division. 2012. Retrieved 2016-06-27.
  6. ^ Jesse, Blackadder (2013-01-01). "Illuminations : casting light upon the earliest female travellers to Antarctica".
  7. ^ Bogen, H. (1957). Main events in the history of Antarctic exploration. Sandefjord: Norwegian Whaling Gazette, page 85
  8. ^ a b c Gammon, Katharine (28 March 2012). "7 Extreme Explorers". Live Science. Retrieved 24 August 2016.
  9. ^ a b c d "Antarctic Firsts". Antarctic Circle. 4 October 2014. Retrieved 24 August 2016.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h "Famous Firsts". The Antarctic Sun. United States Antarctic Program. 13 November 2009. Retrieved 25 August 2016.
  11. ^ a b c Bogle, Ariel (11 August 2016). "New Wikipedia Project Champions Women Scientists in the Antarctic". Mashable. Retrieved 24 August 2016.
  12. ^ "Antarctic Women Then & Now". The Antarctic Book of Cooking and Cleaning. Retrieved 27 August 2016.
  13. ^ a b c "Polar Women Books". Laura Kay. Retrieved 30 August 2016.
  14. ^ "Sanae Iv | Alsa".
  15. ^ "The women of Macquarie Island". www.antarctica.gov.au. Retrieved 2016-12-08.
  16. ^ a b c Blackadder, Jesse (2013). "Heroines of the Ice". Australian Geographic (113). Retrieved 29 August 2016 – via EBSCOhost. (Subscription required (help)). Cite uses deprecated parameter |subscription= (help)
  17. ^ Riffenburgh, Beau, ed. (2007). Encyclopedia of the Antarctic. New York: Routledge. p. 1094. ISBN 978-0415970242.
  18. ^ "Women in Antarctica". NZ History. Retrieved 25 August 2016.
  19. ^ "First Women at Pole". South Pole Station. Retrieved 24 August 2016.
  20. ^ "First Women at Pole". South Pole Station. Retrieved 24 August 2016.
  21. ^ Peden 1998, p. 17.
  22. ^ Green, John; Boothroyd, Ian (1999). "Ann Chapman – inspirational limnologist". New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research. 33 (3): 333–340. doi:10.1080/00288330.1999.9516880.
  23. ^ Stevens, Quentin; Collis, Christy (2003). Gusheh, Maryam; Stead, Naomi (eds.). "Living in the Cold Light of Reason: Colonial Settlements in Antarctica" (PDF). The 20th Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand: 9.
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  25. ^ Burns 2007, p. 1094.
  26. ^ a b Bowden, Tim (1997). The Silence Calling: Australians in Antarctica 1947-1997. St Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin. p. 443. ISBN 978-1864483116.
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  28. ^ Mills, William James (2003). Exploring Polar Frontiers: A Historical Encyclopedia. 1. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO. p. 309. ISBN 9781576074220.
  29. ^ Lewander 2009, p. 96.
  30. ^ Brueck, Hilary (13 February 2016). "Meet The All-Woman Team Heading To Antarctica This Year". Forbes. Retrieved 24 August 2016.
  31. ^ "Brooke Knapp Flies RTW & Over Both Poles in a Gulfstream III (#2)". Wingnet. Retrieved 29 August 2016.
  32. ^ Chaturvedi, Arun (2004). "Indian Women in Antarctic Expeditions: A Historical Perspective". Department of Ocean Development, Technical Publication. 17: 277–279.
  33. ^ Tiwari, Anju (2008). Story of Antarctica. Goa: National Centre for Antarctic and Ocean Research. ISBN 978-81-906526-0-5.
  34. ^ Guerrero, Teresa (12 June 2013). "La abuela científica regresa a la Antártida". El Mundo (in Spanish). Retrieved 29 August 2016.
  35. ^ Rejcek, Peter (13 November 2009). "Women Fully Integrated Into USAP Over Last 40 Years". The Antarctic Sun. United States Antarctic Program. Retrieved 25 August 2016.
  36. ^ Zimmermann, Kim Ann (11 November 2013). "Mount Vinson: Antarctica's Highest Mountain". Live Science. Retrieved 30 August 2016.
  37. ^ a b c Mills, William James (2003). Exploring Polar Frontiers: A Historical Encyclopedia. 1. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO. pp. 716–717. ISBN 9781576074220.
  38. ^ "Tori Murden - An Unprecedented Achievement". JRank. Retrieved 30 August 2016.
  39. ^ Havermans, Charlotte (December 2015). "Interview With the Station Leader of the South Korean Research Base King Sejong in Antarctica: Dr. In-Young Ahn" (PDF). Women in Polar Science (2): 8–13. Retrieved 25 August 2016.
  40. ^ "Serap Tilav – First Turkish woman at South Pole". Polar Research Center. Retrieved 25 August 2016.
  41. ^ Kurtenbach, Elaine (31 March 1991). "Japanese Woman Scales Mountains While Ignoring Society's Stereotypes". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 30 August 2016.
  42. ^ Navy Personnel Command, Timeline of Women in the US Navy, "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-10-10. Retrieved 2014-10-11.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  43. ^ Burns 2001, p. 17.
  44. ^ "Letters from Antarctica". CBS News. 22 December 1999. Retrieved 25 August 2016.
  45. ^ "SANAE IV". Antarctic Legacy of South Africa. Retrieved 29 August 2016.
  46. ^ Shramovych, Vyacheslav (March 7, 2018). "The women among snows: will the Ukrainian women return to Antarctica?". BBC News Ukraine (in Ukrainian). BBC Ukraine. Retrieved July 13, 2018.
  47. ^ "First Chinese Females to Spend Winter at Antarctica". China.org. August 2000. Retrieved 24 August 2016.
  48. ^ Aston, Felicity (September 2005). "Women of the White Continent". Geographical (Campion Interactive Publishing). 77 (9): 26. Retrieved 25 August 2016 – via EBSCOhost. (Subscription required (help)). Cite uses deprecated parameter |subscription= (help)
  49. ^ McKay, Mary-Jayne. "Swimming to America". 60 Minutes. CBS News. Retrieved 21 July 2011.
  50. ^ "Women & the U.S. Coast Guard". United States Coast Guard. Retrieved 29 August 2016.
  51. ^ "Linda Beilharz OAM". Australian Museum. 27 November 2015. Retrieved 24 August 2016.
  52. ^ "Moroccan Astronomer Merieme Chadid". Morocco.com. Retrieved 25 August 2016.
  53. ^ Aislinn Simpson (29 December 2006), "Woman treks alone to South Pole in 39 days", The Guardian, retrieved 2013-03-12
  54. ^ "Annual Report" (PDF). academic.sun.ac.za. Centre of Excellence for Invasion Biology. 2006.
  55. ^ "Register of Grants" (PDF). ir.nrf.ac.za/. National Research Foundation. 2011.
  56. ^ "Team Members". antarcticbiogeography.org. Functional Biogeography of the Antarctic. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
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  58. ^ "2011 Competitors". Antarctic Ice Marathon & 100k. Retrieved 25 August 2016.
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  61. ^ Chua, Grace (31 December 2009). "900km On Foot in Sub-Zero Weather". The Straits Times. Retrieved 11 November 2017 – via LexisNexis. (Subscription required (help)). Cite uses deprecated parameter |subscription= (help)
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  63. ^ "First Cypriot to reach the South Pole" Archived 2010-01-02 at the Wayback Machine, Cyprus Mail, January 1, 2010
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  68. ^ "First to climb Mt. Sidley in Antarctica (Female): Crina Coco Popescu sets world record". World Record Academy. 21 February 2012. Retrieved 25 August 2016.
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Sources[edit]

External links[edit]