Times Square–42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (New York City Subway)

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Times Square–42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal
"1" train "2" train "3" train "7" train "7" express train "A" train "C" train "E" train "N" train "Q" train "R" train "W" train 42nd Street Shuttle
New York City Subway rapid transit station complex
Times Square-42nd Street Entrance.JPG
Entrance to the station at 42nd Street & 7th Avenue
Station statistics
Address West 42nd Street, Broadway, Seventh, & Eighth Avenues
New York, NY 10036
Borough Manhattan
Locale Times Square, Midtown Manhattan
Coordinates 40°45′21.6″N 73°59′13.2″W / 40.756000°N 73.987000°W / 40.756000; -73.987000Coordinates: 40°45′21.6″N 73°59′13.2″W / 40.756000°N 73.987000°W / 40.756000; -73.987000
Division A (IRT), B (BMT, IND)
Line IRT 42nd Street Shuttle
BMT Broadway Line
IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line
IND Eighth Avenue Line
IRT Flushing Line
Services       1 all times (all times)
      2 all times (all times)
      3 all times (all times)
      7 all times (all times) <7> rush hours until 9:30 p.m., peak direction (rush hours until 9:30 p.m., peak direction)
      A all times (all times)
      C all except late nights (all except late nights)
      E all times (all times)
      N all times (all times)
      Q all times (all times)
      R all except late nights (all except late nights)
      W weekdays only (weekdays only)
      S all except late nights (all except late nights)
Transit connections Bus transport NYCT Bus: M7, M20, M34A SBS, M42, M104, X17J, X22, X30, X31
Bus transport MTA Bus: BxM2
Bus transport Port Authority Bus Terminal
Structure Underground
Levels 5
Other information
Opened June 3, 1917; 100 years ago (1917-06-03)[1]
Station code 611[2]
Accessible This station is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 ADA-accessible (all lines except 42nd Street Shuttle; passageway between IND platforms and rest of complex is not accessible)
Wireless service Wi-Fi and cellular service is provided at this station[3]
Traffic
Passengers (2016) 64,531,511 (complex)[4]Decrease 2.8%
Rank 1 out of 422

Times Square–42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal is a New York City Subway station complex located under Times Square and the Port Authority Bus Terminal, at the intersection of 42nd Street, Seventh and Eighth Avenues, and Broadway in Midtown Manhattan. It is the busiest station complex in the system, serving 64,531,511 passengers in 2016.[4]

The complex allows free transfers between the IRT 42nd Street Shuttle, the BMT Broadway Line, the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line and the IRT Flushing Line, with a long transfer to the IND Eighth Avenue Line one block west at 42nd Street–Port Authority Bus Terminal. The complex is served by the:

  • 1, 2, 3, 7, A, E, N, and Q trains at all times
  • W train during weekdays
  • C, R, and 42nd Street Shuttle (S) trains at all times except late nights
  • <7> trains during rush hours in the peak direction

Station layout[edit]

G Street Level Exits / Entrances
B1 Upper Mezzanines Fare control, station agent, 42nd Street Shuttle platforms (Times Square), shops (Port Authority Bus Terminal)
Handicapped/disabled access (Elevators located:
  • on the SE corner of Seventh Avenue and 42nd Street for "1" train "2" train "3" train "7" train "7" express train "N" train "Q" train "R" train "W" train trains only.
  • inside north wing of bus terminal at Eighth Avenue between 41st Street and 42nd Street, near airport bus ticket office for "A" train "C" train "E" train trains only.
  • inside the InterContinental Hotel at the SW corner of Eighth Avenue at 44th Street, for "A" train "C" train "E" train trains only. There is both an elevator and a lift; the lift can be manually operated by a station agent's assistance.

Note: Passageway between IND platforms and rest of the complex is a steep grade)

Side platform, doors will open on the right
Track 4 42nd Street Shuttle toward Grand Central–42nd Street all except nights (Terminus)
Track 3 42nd Street Shuttle toward Grand Central–42nd Street all except nights (Terminus)
Side platform, doors will open on the left
Track 1 42nd Street Shuttle toward Grand Central–42nd Street all except nights (Terminus)
Side platform, doors will open on the left
B2
Eighth
Avenue
Line
platforms
Southbound local "C" train toward Euclid Avenue ("A" train toward Far Rockaway late nights) (34th Street–Penn Station (Eighth))
"E" train toward World Trade Center (34th Street–Penn Station (Eighth))
Island platform, doors will open on the left, right Handicapped/disabled access
Southbound express "A" train toward Lefferts Boulevard or Far Rockaway (all except nights), or Rockaway Park (PM rush) (34th Street–Penn Station (Eighth))
Northbound express "A" train toward 207th Street (59th Street–Columbus Circle)
Island platform, doors will open on the left, right Handicapped/disabled access
Northbound local "C" train toward 168th Street ("A" train toward 207th Street late nights) (50th Street (Eighth))
"E" train toward Jamaica Center–Parsons/Archer (50th Street (Eighth))
B2
Broadway –
Seventh
Avenue
Line
platforms
Southbound local "1" train ("2" train weekend late nights) toward South Ferry ("2" train toward Brooklyn College weekday late nights) (34th Street–Penn Station (Broadway–Seventh))
Island platform, doors will open on the left, right Handicapped/disabled access
Southbound express "2" train toward Brooklyn College weekdays except late nights, South Ferry weekends except late nights (34th Street–Penn Station (Broadway–Seventh))
"3" train toward New Lots Avenue (all except nights) (34th Street–Penn Station (Broadway–Seventh))
"3" train alighting passengers only (late nights)
Northbound express "2" train toward Wakefield–241st Street weekdays except late nights, Eastchester-Dyre Avenue weekends except late nights (72nd Street)
"3" train toward Harlem–148th Street (72nd Street)
Island platform, doors will open on the left, right Handicapped/disabled access
Northbound local "1" train toward 242nd Street ("2" train toward 241st Street weekday late nights, Dyre Avenue weekend late nights) (50th Street (Broadway–Seventh))
B2
Broadway
Line
platforms
Southbound local "N" train toward Stillwell Avenue via Sea Beach ("Q" train via Brighton late nights) (34th Street–Herald Square)
"R" train toward Bay Ridge–95th Street (34th Street–Herald Square)
"W" train toward Whitehall Street–South Ferry weekdays (34th Street–Herald Square)
Island platform, doors will open on the left, right Handicapped/disabled access
Southbound express "Q" train toward Stillwell Avenue via Brighton except late nights (34th Street–Herald Square)
"N" train rush hours toward Coney Island–Stillwell Avenue via Sea Beach (34th Street–Herald Square)
Northbound express "Q" train except late nights ("N" train rush hours) toward 96th Street (57th Street–Seventh Avenue)
Island platform, doors will open on the left, right Handicapped/disabled access
Northbound local "N" train ("W" train weekdays) toward Astoria–Ditmars Boulevard (49th Street)
"R" train toward Forest Hills–71st Avenue (49th Street)
"Q" train toward 96th Street late nights (49th Street)
B3 Lower Mezzanine Passageway up to "A" train "C" train "E" train mezzanine (level B1)
B4 Southbound
Track 1
"7" train ("7" express train AM rush hours) toward 34th Street–Hudson Yards (Terminus)
Island platform, doors will open on the left Handicapped/disabled access
Northbound
Track 2
"7" train ("7" express train PM rush hours) toward Flushing–Main Street (Fifth Avenue)

The IRT platforms have been connected to each other as a transfer station as the lines opened: first between the 42nd Street Shuttle and the Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line in 1917, then the transfer was incorporated with the Flushing Line in 1927.[5] On December 24, 1932, a 600-foot-long (180 m) passageway was opened, connecting the IND Eighth Avenue Line station and the IRT platforms, with a new entrance at West 41st Street between Seventh Avenue and Eighth Avenue.[5][6] The passageway was not located within a fare control, and passengers had to pay an extra fare to transfer between the IND and the IRT station.[6] The free transfer between the IRT and BMT was added on July 1, 1948.[7] The block-long passageway that runs west to the 42nd Street–Port Authority Bus Terminal station on the IND Eighth Avenue Line was reopened within fare control on December 11, 1988.[8]

Since 1991, this passageway has contained a piece of public art inspired by the Burma-Shave ads; Norman B. Colp's The Commuter's Lament, or A Close Shave consists of a series of signs attached to the roof of the passageway, reading:

Entrance

Overslept,
So tired.
If late,
Get fired.
Why bother?
Why the pain?
Just go home
Do it again.

The last panel is a picture of a bed. The panels were part of an art project that was supposed to last only one year, but was never removed.[9]

This station underwent total reconstruction in stages starting in 1994.[5] Phase 1 rebuilt the Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line platforms with a new mezzanine, stairs, and elevators, and was completed in 2002. Phase 2, finished in 2006, rebuilt the Broadway Line, Flushing Line, and Eighth Avenue Line portions of the station.[5] Phase 3, for the shuttle platforms, has yet to be started[5] but will be funded as part of the 2015–2019 MTA Capital Program.[10][11] The reconstruction included a new entryway on the south side of 42nd Street between Seventh Avenue and Broadway, featuring a bright neon and colored glass flashing sign with the train route symbols and the word "Subway". The street level fare control at this site features restored original "Times Square" mosaics from the Contract I station walls (now used by the shuttle), and both escalators and stairs lead into the complex. There are also similar renovated entrances on the northwest and southwest corners of Seventh Avenue and 42nd Street, the latter of which has both escalators and stairs, while the former has only stairs.

In 1999, a US$44 million renovation of the complex began.[5] The goal was to reduce congestion and improve rider access, comfort and safety by improving visual lines and increasing pedestrian capacity. The main corridor was widened 15 feet (4.6 m), and the number of sharp corners reduced; ADA accessibility was introduced with elevators; new escalators; and other corridors were widened. The mezzanine above the BMT Broadway Line, formerly a record shop, now features a large oval balcony looking over the trackway and has reduced the sense of claustrophobia described by many riders. In 2004, four unisex stall bathrooms were opened on the mezzanine between the IRT and BMT lines; they are staffed and maintained by employees of the Times Square Alliance, the local Business Improvement District. The record shop re-opened in 2007 on the south side of the IRT/BMT corridor.[12]

The mezzanine has been a major featured spot for subway performers ever since the opening of the station. "Music Under New York" controls the spot, which is located by the escalators, opposite the shuttle to Grand Central. Musicians of all types, from musical saw to a brass band, perform there daily.[citation needed]

Exits[edit]

Exits and entrances are located from two main areas: under Eighth Avenue and under Times Square itself.[13]

From the Eighth Avenue portion of the complex:

  • One street stair each to the NW, NE, and SE corners of 8th Avenue and 40th Street[13]
  • Two underground passageways to Port Authority Bus Terminal[13]
    • One between 40th and 41st Streets
    • Handicapped/disabled access One between 41st and 42nd Streets
  • One street stair to the NW corner of 8th Avenue and 42nd Street[13]
  • One stair in building on east side of 8th Avenue north of 42nd Street[13]
  • Escalator bank in building on south side of 42nd Street east of 8th Avenue[13]
  • One street stair to the SW corner of 8th Avenue and 43rd Street[13]
  • One street stair each to the NW, SW, and SE corners of 8th Avenue and 44th Street[13]
    • Handicapped/disabled access The SW corner entrance also has a wheelchair lift

From the Times Square portion of the complex:

  • One street stair on the east side of One Times Square at 43rd Street[13]
  • One stair in building on north side of 42nd Street west of 7th Avenue[13]
  • One stair in building on south side of 42nd Street west of 7th Avenue[13]
  • Handicapped/disabled access Elevator and escalator bank in building on south side of 42nd Street between 7th Avenue and Broadway[13]
  • One street stair at SE corner of Broadway and 42nd Street[13]
  • One stair in building at NE corner of 7th Avenue and 41st Street[13]
  • Two street stairs at SE corner of 7th Avenue and 41st Street[13]
  • Two street stairs at SW corner of Broadway and 41st Street[13]
  • One stair in building on south side of 40th Street west of 7th Avenue[13]
  • One street stair at SE corner of 7th Avenue and 40th Street[13]
  • One street stair each to the NW, NE, SW, and SE corners of Broadway and 40th Street[13]

Relative depths[edit]

The relative depths of the station's platforms are:[14]

IRT 42nd Street Shuttle platforms[edit]

Times Square
42nd Street Shuttle
New York City Subway rapid transit station
Times Square - 42nd Street - Shuttle Track 1.jpg
Shuttle platform for track 1
Station statistics
Division A (IRT)
Line IRT 42nd Street Shuttle
Services       S all except late nights (all except late nights)
Structure Underground
Platforms 3 side platforms (all connected at west end)
Tracks 3
Other information
Opened October 27, 1904; 112 years ago (1904-10-27)[15]
Station code 468[2]
Accessible The mezzanine is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, but the platforms are not compliant ADA-accessible to mezzanine only; accessibilty to platforms planned
Wireless service Wi-Fi and cellular service is provided at this station[3]
Former/other names 42nd Street
Station succession
Next north Tracks 1 and 3: (Terminal): S all except late nights
Track 4: 50th Street: no regular service
Next south Grand Central: S all except late nights
Track layout
Movable pedestrian bridge
over Track 4
The original station before reconfiguration
Shuttle platform for track 3. A shuttle train can be seen on the same track.

When it first opened on October 27, 1904, Times Square was a local station on New York City's first subway, so named by IRT president August Belmont because it was located directly under the Times Building, headquarters of The New York Times.[5] Three shuttle tracks have served it since 1918; the southbound express track was removed and replaced by a temporary wooden platform for access to the original northbound express track. The former southbound platform (serving track 1) still has a vestiges of a doorway to the Knickerbocker Hotel, while the northbound platform (serving track 4) retains a former doorway to the Times Building.[5]

On both sides platforms are located (at the old local platforms) and where the southbound express track was; all three platforms connect on the west (railroad north) side. This walkway crosses the northbound local track (track 4) on a bridge that can be lifted for the only access to that track, via a merge into the northbound IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line local track along the original subway alignment (north of the current Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line station).[5] This track merge is only used for overnight swaps and special railfan excursion trains. The other three tracks once curved parallel to this.

Two of the three tracks end at bumper blocks at the west end of the platforms. Between the northbound local and the other tracks anywhere along the shuttle there is no track connection.

Because of the curvature on the platforms, gap fillers are used to bridge the gap between train and platform; however, the gap fillers, which are under the platform rather than flush with the platform, are not suitable for wheelchair passengers, making the shuttle platforms virtually inaccessible to wheelchair users. Such passengers who need service to Grand Central must use the IRT Flushing Line platforms. An underpass that formerly connected the original side platforms lies between the downtown local track and the other three tracks of the BMT Broadway Line, which runs perpendicular to the shuttle.

Tracks 1 and 3 have gap fillers. Track 4 does not have gap fillers because of the convex curve of the platform. Track 4 can barely fit the three cars of the shuttle; it originally ended at a wall but now has a small extension for alighting passengers, so the last pair of doors of the train keep one panel disabled for added safety. Track 3 can accommodate trains with four cars as well as space for half a fifth.

This is the only station in the station complex that does not have ADA-accessibility, but the MTA is scheduling some improvements to make it accessible under the guidelines of the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 as part of the 2015–2019 MTA Capital Program. As part of the program, the 42nd Street Shuttle will become ADA accessible, and the shuttle will be reconfigured from three tracks to two tracks, and the trains will become six cars long. The whole project will cost $235.41 million. The Times Square shuttle platform will be extended to allow for a second point of entry, this one being at Sixth Avenue, with a connection to the IND Sixth Avenue Line. The Times Square station will be rehabilitated with congestion mitigation measures. A wider stairway would be installed from the shuttle mezzanine to street level, a new control area would be installed at the bottom of the stairway, and 21 columns would be removed. The connection to the Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line would probably be removed with the elimination of Track 4. The cost of this part of the project is $30 million.[10][11] The project is delayed,[16] and construction will start in May 2018.[17]

IND Eighth Avenue Line platforms[edit]

42nd Street–Port Authority Bus Terminal
"A" train "C" train "E" train
New York City Subway rapid transit station
42nd Street - Port Authority Bus Terminal - Downtown Platform.jpg
Downtown platform.
Station statistics
Division B (IND)
Line       IND Eighth Avenue Line
Services       A all times (all times)
      C all except late nights (all except late nights)
      E all times (all times)
Structure Underground
Platforms 2 island platforms
cross-platform interchange
Tracks 4
Other information
Opened September 10, 1932; 85 years ago (1932-09-10)[18] (upper level)
August 25, 1952; 65 years ago (1952-08-25)[19] (lower level)
Closed 1981 (lower level)
Station code 163[2]
Accessible This station is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 ADA-accessible (passageway to other services not accessible)
Wireless service Wi-Fi and cellular service is provided at this station[3]
Station succession
Next north 59th Street–Columbus Circle (express): A all except late nights
50th Street (local): A late nights C all except late nights
50th Street (Queens Boulevard): E all times
Next south 34th Street–Penn Station: A all times C all except late nights E all times


Next adjacent station compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 north 59th Street–Columbus Circle (8th Ave): A all times C all except late nights
Lexington Avenue–53rd Street (Queens Boulevard): E all times
Next adjacent station compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 south 34th Street–Penn Station: A all times C all except late nights E all times
Track layout
to 50 St lower level
to 50 St upper level
to former lower level
Wall mosaics

42nd Street–Port Authority Bus Terminal is an express station on the IND Eighth Avenue Line. It is partly underneath the Port Authority Bus Terminal. It has one platform level, two offset island platforms, and a long mezzanine. Formerly, it also had a lower level with a single side platform. The upper level opened on September 10, 1932,[18][20] and the lower level opened on August 25, 1952.[19]

Platform level[edit]

The platform level of the station contains four tracks and two island platforms; the northbound platform extends from 42nd to 44th Streets, while the southbound platform extends from 40th to 42nd Streets. The station's mezzanine extends four blocks from 40th to 44th Streets, and connects with the rest of the complex by a long passageway underneath 41st Street.[21][22]

Former lower level[edit]

In addition to the level currently in use, there was formerly a lower platform on the southbound side (one track underneath the downtown local track on the upper level, and one side platform underneath the island platform above). The lower level was built together with the upper level platforms in the late 1920s/early 1930s, but existed as an unfinished shell until it was completed and opened in August 1952 to serve rush hour E trains.[19][23] For most of its existence, the lower level platform was only used for occasional service specials, including summer "Rockaway Special" trains to Beach 98th Street at the Rockaways' Playland beginning in 1958, the Aqueduct Racetrack special fare trains from 1959 to 1981, and rush hour E trains in the 1970s, beginning on March 23, 1970.[24][25][26][27]

The lower level featured two high-speed escalators to the mezzanine, and three staircases to the upper-level platform. The walls featured 1950s-era cream tiles, a purple and black tile band, and white mosaic name plates with black "42ND ST" text.[19][23][24]

Theories differ on why the lower level platform was built. The platform could only be reached by trains originating from Queens via the IND Queens Boulevard Line, and 53rd Street (the current E service). Some commentators have speculated that this was meant to allow Manhattan-bound E trains from Queens to hold at 42nd Street without slowing down service on trains traveling from Central Park West,[25] while the reported purpose of the platform upon its opening was to allow E trains to load and unload passengers without having to wait for one of the two upper level tracks to clear.[19][23] Others have suggested that the lower level platform was built to prevent the IRT Flushing Line from being extended westward. The IND lower level platform was located just beyond the tail tracks on the IRT Flushing Line platform.[22][25][28]

Film producers have used the lower level platform for several films, most notably Ghost (1990), starring Patrick Swayze and Demi Moore.[24][25]

In the late 2000s, the MTA began construction on a planned extension of the IRT Flushing Line to 34th Street, which would require demolishing the IND Eighth Avenue lower level platform.[25] As of January 2010, the lower level platform was being demolished as part of the Flushing Line extension.[29] Transit blogger Benjamin Kabak, who was invited to tour the Flushing Line extension and view construction progress, reported in February 2012 that the lower level platform had been "bisected" by the Flushing Line extension.[30] The tunnels slope down through where the old lower level platform was.[28]

IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line platforms[edit]

Times Square–42nd Street
"1" train "2" train "3" train
New York City Subway rapid transit station
Times Square-42nd Street (Broadway-Seventh Avenue Line).jpg
Downtown platform
Station statistics
Division A (IRT)
Line IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line
Services       1 all times (all times)
      2 all times (all times)
      3 all times (all times)
Structure Underground
Platforms 2 island platforms
cross-platform interchange
Tracks 4
Other information
Opened June 3, 1917; 100 years ago (1917-06-03)[1]
Station code 317[2]
Accessible This station is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 ADA-accessible (Transfer accessible to BMT Broadway Line and IRT Flushing Line platforms only)
Wireless service Wi-Fi and cellular service is provided at this station[3]
Station succession
Next north 72nd Street (express): 2 all except late nights 3 all times
50th Street (local): 1 all times 2 late nights
Next south 34th Street–Penn Station: 1 all times 2 all times 3 all except weekday late nights
(Terminal): 3 weekday late nights


Next adjacent station compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 north 72nd Street (express): 2 all except late nights 3 all times
59th Street–Columbus Circle (local): 1 all times 2 late nights
Next adjacent station compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 south 34th Street–Penn Station: 1 all times 2 all times 3 all except weekday late nights
none: 3 weekday late nights

Times Square–42nd Street is an express station on the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line, with four tracks and two island platforms. Access to the other lines is provided at the northern end and in the center of each platform. An elevator leads from each platform to the mezzanine; the southbound elevator also leads to the Flushing Line platform.

Just south of the station, a fifth center track begins, formed by a connection from each express track. This track merges back into the two express tracks just before 34th Street–Penn Station.[31] This center track was used in the past for turning rush hour "Gap Trains", which would head back up north. It is currently used for short turning 3 trains during nights.[32]

This section was the site of a 1928 wreck that killed 16 people, the second worst in New York City history (the worst being the Malbone Street Wreck in Brooklyn, which killed at least 93).

BMT Broadway Line platforms[edit]

Times Square–42nd Street
"N" train "Q" train "R" train "W" train
New York City Subway rapid transit station
42st NQRW.jpeg
Uptown platform
Station statistics
Division B (BMT)
Line       BMT Broadway Line
Services       N all times (all times)
      Q all times (all times)
      R all except late nights (all except late nights)
      W weekdays only (weekdays only)
Structure Underground
Platforms 2 island platforms
cross-platform interchange
Tracks 4
Other information
Opened January 5, 1918; 99 years ago (1918-01-05)[33]
Station code 011[2]
Accessible This station is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 ADA-accessible (Transfer accessible to IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line & IRT Flushing Line platforms only)
Wireless service Wi-Fi and cellular service is provided at this station[3]
Station succession
Next north 57th Street–Seventh Avenue (express): Q all times
49th Street (local): N all times Q late nights only R all except late nights W weekdays only
Next south 34th Street–Herald Square: N all times Q all times R all except late nights W weekdays only


Next adjacent station compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 north Lexington Avenue–63rd Street: N selected rush-hour trips Q all times
49th Street: N all times Q late nights only R all except late nights W weekdays only (northbound only; via local)
Next adjacent station compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 south 34th Street–Herald Square: N all times Q all times R all except late nights W weekdays only
Track layout

Times Square–42nd Street is an express station on the BMT Broadway Line that has four tracks and two island platforms. Connections to the other lines are at the northern end of the platforms.

The express tracks north of the station spread out to pass around a crossunder in the Times Square shuttle platforms. This crossunder was sealed off in the 1960s.

History[edit]

On February 8, 1914, the Public Service Commission ordered Chief Engineer Craven to make this station an express station as opposed to a local station as originally planned. The change was made at the insistence of Brooklynites who wanted an express station in the theater section of Manhattan. Under the original plan, the express stop would have been located at 47th Street, with a local stop at 42nd. The stop, as an express station, was planned to have connections to the IRT shuttle platforms, the Steinway tunnel line, and the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line.[34]

On June 1, 1940, the title of the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation was transferred to the City of New York, signifying the first phase of unification of New York's subway system with the Independent Subway System as well as eventual public operation of the entire system. (The Interborough Rapid Transit Company would be merged on June 15 of the same year.) At midnight, a ceremony commemorating the transfer, with five hundred people in attendance, was held at the Times Square station. The last BMT train had left the 57th Street station five minutes earlier. When the train arrived at Times Square, BMT president William S. Menden handed over his company's properties to Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia, who then gave them to New York City Board of Transportation chairman John H. Delaney. The Board of Transportation operated the New York City Transit System until the creation of the New York City Transit Authority in 1953.[35]

This station received a minor overhaul in the late 1970s when MTA fixed the station's structure and the overall appearance, and it repaired staircases and platform edges, removed pedestrian ramps, and replaced lighting.

In 2004-2006, the station received a major overhaul and repairs, including upgrading the station for ADA compliance and restoring the original late 1910s tiling. MTA repaired the staircases, retiled the walls, added new tiling on the floors, upgraded the station's lights and the public address system, installed ADA yellow safety treads along the platform edge, and installed new signs and new trackbeds in both directions.

"42" monogram mosaic

IRT Flushing Line platform[edit]

Times Square-42nd Street
"7" train "7" express train
New York City Subway rapid transit station
Times Square - 42nd Street - Flushing Line Platform.jpg
The IRT Flushing Line platform
Station statistics
Division A (IRT)
Line       IRT Flushing Line
Services       7 all times (all times) <7> rush hours until 9:30 p.m., peak direction (rush hours until 9:30 p.m., peak direction)
Structure Underground
Platforms 1 island platform
Tracks 2
Other information
Opened March 14, 1927; 90 years ago (1927-03-14)[36]
Station code 467[2]
Accessible This station is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 ADA-accessible (Transfer accessible to IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line and BMT Broadway Line platforms only)
Wireless service Wi-Fi and cellular service is provided at this station[3]
Station succession
Next north Fifth Avenue: 7 all times <7> rush hours until 9:30 p.m., peak direction
Next south 34th Street–Hudson Yards: 7 all times <7> rush hours until 9:30 p.m., peak direction


Next adjacent station compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 north Grand Central: 7 all times <7> rush hours until 9:30 p.m., peak direction
Next adjacent station compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 south 34th Street–Hudson Yards: 7 all times <7> rush hours until 9:30 p.m., peak direction
Track layout
to 5 Av
Queensboro Subway Service Extended To Times Square station 1927

Times Square (signed as and announced on trains as Times Square–42nd Street) on the IRT Flushing Line has one island platform and two tracks, located deep below West 41st Street.

History[edit]

The Times Square station opened on March 14, 1927, extending the Flushing Line westward from its previous terminus at Fifth Avenue.[37] This station served as the terminus for 7 <7> trains from its opening on March 14, 1927, until September 13, 2015, when the next station west (railroad south), 34th Street–Hudson Yards, opened.[38][39] The platforms at Times Square and all other stations on the Flushing Line with the exception of Queensboro Plaza were extended in 1955–1956 to accommodate 11-car trains.[40]

Layout[edit]

Stairs, escalators, and an elevator along the platform lead to various mezzanines. There are "TS" tile mosaics along the station walls. An office is located at the north (compass east) end of the platform. An elevator was recently installed and connects with the Downtown IRT Seventh Avenue platform and then the mezzanine. The elevators make this platform, along with the platform at Grand Central accessible to wheelchair passengers (unlike the shuttle platforms, which are not accessible to wheelchairs).

The tracks continue south (compass west) beyond the station to the 34th Street station. These tracks formerly led to an unused storage and layover area, but the extension of the Flushing Line, whose trackwork was completed in 2013, included the addition of third rails to the layover tracks, as well as the inspection and replacement of these tracks.[41] The closed lower level platform at 42nd Street–Port Authority Bus Terminal on the IND Eighth Avenue Line was blocking the line but since removed.[24] Currently, all Flushing-bound service is on the eastbound track, labeled Track 2, and 34th Street-bound service is on the westbound track, labeled Track 1.[39]

Artwork[edit]

George Lewis Heins and Christopher Grant LaFarge were the first commissioned architects of the IRT. They designed the original Times Square Station, which was located at the current Grand Central Shuttle stop.

In many of their stations, Heins and LaFarge use symbolic imagery to honor a neighborhood or its namesake. When Squire Vickers took over as chief designer and architect of the IRT in 1906, he continued this tradition of using symbolism to speak to a station's history.

The colored tile trim of the IRT portions of the station closely resembles the Confederate flag.[42] Scholars believe that Vickers and his colleagues unmistakably reference the symbol of the South to pay homage to New York Times owner Adolph S. Ochs.[43] The Confederacy was a significant part of Ochs' heritage, and the eccentric Vickers relished literary and historical imagery.[44] After a 2010s movement in which Confederate monuments nationwide were removed, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority announced in August 2017 that these tiles would be replaced.[45][46]

Times Square was named for The New York Times, whose headquarters, built by Ochs, housed the original subway station (now the shuttle platforms) in its basement.

Modern artwork installed in the complex includes the following:

New York in Transit was Lawrence's last public work before his 2000 death.[47] Lichtenstein completed Times Square Mural in 1994, but installation was delayed until after the station complex's renovation, during which Lichtenstein died in 1997.[48]

Foiled terrorist attack[edit]

Najibullah Zazi and alleged co-conspirators were arrested in September 2009 as part of an al-Qaeda Islamist plan to engage in suicide bombings on trains in the New York City subway system, including near the Times Square station, during rush hour that month, and Zazi has pleaded guilty.[49][50][51][52]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b The New York Times, Three New Links of the Dual Subway System Opened, June 3, 1917, page 33
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Station Developers' Information". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved June 13, 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "NYC Subway Wireless – Active Stations". Transit Wireless Wifi. Retrieved 2016-05-18.
  4. ^ a b "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2011–2016". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. May 31, 2017. Retrieved June 1, 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i Dunlap, David W. (March 28, 2004). "1904-2004; Crossroads of the Whirl". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 17, 2016. 
  6. ^ a b "600-Foot Pedestrian Tunnel, Linking Subways, Opens Today". The New York Times. December 24, 1932. Retrieved October 10, 2016. 
  7. ^ The New York Times, Transfer Points Under Higher Fare, June 30, 1948, page 19
  8. ^ Lyall, Sarah (December 12, 1988). "All Aboard. . .Somewhere. . .for Subway Changes!". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved July 24, 2016. 
  9. ^ "Artwork: "The Commuter's Lament/A Close Shave", Norman B. Colp (1991)". Retrieved October 22, 2008. 
  10. ^ a b "METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY (MTA) NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING AND DESCRIPTION OF PROJECTS Tuesday, August 23, 2016 4:30 P.M. Request for Federal Financial Assistance Under the Federal Transportation Authorization For Federal Fiscal Year 2017 Capital Improvement Projects" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 28, 2016. Retrieved August 7, 2016. 
  11. ^ a b "MTA Capital Program 2015-2019" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. October 28, 2015. Retrieved December 17, 2016. 
  12. ^ Review and photos of the Times Square bathrooms at Gothamist
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s "MTA Neighborhood Maps: Midtown West" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2015. Retrieved December 11, 2015. 
  14. ^ nycsubway.org – IND 8th Avenue: 42nd Street-Port Authority Bus Terminal
  15. ^ The New York Times, Our Subway Open: 150,000 Try It, October 28, 1904
  16. ^ "Transit and Bus Committee December 2016" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. February 21, 2017. Retrieved February 21, 2017. 
  17. ^ "T7041404 Reconstruction of Times Square Shuttle - Phase 3". web.mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved September 3, 2017. 
  18. ^ a b The New York Times, List of the 28 Stations on the New Eighth Ave Line, September 10, 1932, page 6
  19. ^ a b c d e "New IND Platform Will Open Monday". nytimes.com. The New York Times. August 23, 1952. Retrieved June 30, 2015. 
  20. ^ Crowell, Paul (September 10, 1932). "Gay Midnight Crowd Rides First Trains In The New Subway: Throngs at Station an Hour Before Time, Rush Turnstiles When Chains are Dropped". The New York Times. Retrieved November 8, 2015. 
  21. ^ "MTA Neighborhood Maps: Pennsylvania Station/Times Square" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2015. Retrieved December 11, 2015. 
  22. ^ a b "Station: 42nd Street-Port Authority Bus Terminal (8th Avenue)". Retrieved April 6, 2013. 
  23. ^ a b c Ingraham, Joseph C. (June 20, 1952). "New IND Platform at 8th and 42d To Expedite Service From Queens". nytimes.com. The New York Times. Retrieved June 30, 2015. 
  24. ^ a b c d Mindlin, Alex (April 20, 2008). "No Whoosh, No ‘All Aboard’". The New York Times. Retrieved July 10, 2009. 
  25. ^ a b c d e Kabak, Benjamin (April 21, 2008). "With the 7 on the way, a swan song for a Times Square platform". Retrieved April 6, 2013. 
  26. ^ Brennan, Joseph (2002). "Abandoned Stations: 42 St Lower Level". Retrieved May 4, 2015. 
  27. ^ "Non-Stop Trips, Reserved Seats On Special Here: Deluxe Subway Express Ride Also Features Music; $1.55 Round-Trip Fare From 42nd Street To Playland Station Provides Admission And Rides" (PDF). Wave of Long Island. Fultonhistory.com. July 3, 1958. p. 1. Retrieved August 17, 2016. 
  28. ^ a b "7 Line Extension 081". Flickr. 
  29. ^ Donohue, Pete (June 20, 2009). "Abandoned No More: 2nd Life Drilled into Old 7 Subway Platform". New York Daily News. Retrieved January 30, 2010. 
  30. ^ Kabak, Benjamin (February 12, 2012). "Photos: Inside the 7 line extension". Retrieved April 6, 2013. 
  31. ^ Marrero, Robert (January 1, 2017). "472 Stations, 850 Miles" (PDF). B24 Blog, via Dropbox. Retrieved October 9, 2015. 
  32. ^ "Service Enhancements on 3 Line" (Press release). MTA New York City Transit. July 24, 2008. Retrieved July 26, 2008. 
  33. ^ The New York Times, Open New Subway to Times Square, January 6, 1918
  34. ^ Eagle, From The Brooklyn (February 8, 1914). "42D STREET AN EXPRESS STOP.; A Big Victory for Brooklynites, Says The Brooklyn Eagle.". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved August 1, 2017. 
  35. ^ Hood, Clifton (2004). 722 Miles: The Building of the Subways and How They Transformed New York (Centennial ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 238–239. ISBN 0-8018-8054-8. 
  36. ^ The New York Times, New Queens Subway Opened to Times Sq., March 15, 1927, page 1
  37. ^ "New Queens Subway Opened to Times Sq.". The New York Times. March 15, 1927. p. 1. Retrieved October 2, 2011. 
  38. ^ "New 34 St-Hudson Yards 7 Station Opens". Building for the Future. New York, New York: Metropolitan Transit Authority. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved March 10, 2016. The new station opened September 13, 2015 
  39. ^ a b "7 subway service is now running to/from the new 34 St-Hudson Yards station. Times Sq-42 St is no longer the Manhattan terminal. At Times Sq-42 St, Queens-bound express and local service leave from Track 2 only.". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. September 2015. Retrieved December 18, 2016. 
  40. ^ Authority, New York City Transit (1955). Minutes and Proceedings. 
  41. ^ "View of Tunnel from station platform showing sign indicating no third rail power". Retrieved April 1, 2009. 
  42. ^ "Confederate Flags in Times Square?". History Net: Where History Comes Alive – World & US History Online. 
  43. ^ Jackowe, David J. "The Times Square Confederate." Civil War Times; Aug 2012, Vol. 51 Issue 4, p. 42. http://www.historynet.com/confederate-flags-in-times-square.htm
  44. ^ Underground Renaissance Man: Watch the Aesthetic Walls, Please
  45. ^ Plitt, Amy (2017-08-18). "MTA will modify Times Square subway tile resembling a Confederate flag". Curbed NY. Retrieved 2017-08-31. 
  46. ^ Stevens, Matt (2017-08-18). "M.T.A. to Modify Subway Station Design Resembling Confederate Flag". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-08-31. 
  47. ^ "Times Square Subway Mural Unveiled" (Press release). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. November 7, 2001. Retrieved April 11, 2010. 
  48. ^ Carol Vogel. "Times Square Mural". The Roy Lichtenstein Foundation. Retrieved April 11, 2010. 
  49. ^ Zraik, Karen; Johnston, David (September 15, 2009). "Man in Queens Raids Denies Any Terrorist Link". The New York Times. Archived from the original on September 21, 2009. 
  50. ^ Johnston, David; Baker, Al (September 18, 2009). "Denver Man Admits to a Possible Al Qaeda Connection, Officials Say". The New York Times. Archived from the original on September 21, 2009. 
  51. ^ Johnston, David; Rashbaum, William K. (September 20, 2009). "Terror Suspect Had Bomb Guide, Authorities Say". The New York Times. Archived from the original on September 21, 2009. 
  52. ^ Zazi Reveals Details Of Foiled Terror Plot - retrieved from NY1 local news channel on December 4, 2010

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

nycsubway.org:

MTA Arts for Transit

Google Maps Street View

Other websites