Tina Chancey

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Tina Chancey is a multi-instrumentalist specializing in early bowed strings from the rebec and vielle to the kamenj, viol and lyra viol. She is Visiting Assistant Professor of Music at The College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia.[citation needed]

Early life and education[edit]

Chancey received her Bachelor's in Music and MA in performance from Queens College, City University of New York, her MA in Musicology from New York University, and her PhD in Musicology from the online Union Institute.[citation needed]

Career[edit]

She has received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts to support solo performances on the pardessus de viole at the Kennedy Center and Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall.[1]

She started Hesperus, an ensemble, with her husband Scott Reiss.

Chancey has also performed with the Folger Consort and the Ensemble for Early Music.

In addition, she has written articles for publications such as Early Music America Magazine, as a book reviewer.[2]

Chancey has been a member of the Renaissance-Rock group Blackmore's Night (featuring Ritchie Blackmore of Deep Purple and Rainbow with his partner, Candice Night). Her stage name with them is "Tudor Rose."[3]

Discography[edit]

As part of Hesperus[edit]

  • Food of Love - Renaissance instrumental music from the British Isles. Dances, ayres, divisions and variations.
  • My Thing is My Own
  • Dancing Day - Traditional Christmas music from the British Isles, Italy, and Germany from the Middle Ages to the 18th century. Spain in the New World, Spanish and Native American music from New Spain, 16th to 18th centuries.
  • Baroque Recorder Concerti - Concertos by Telemann, Vivaldi, Graupner, Naudot, and Babel featuring Scott Reiss as recorder soloist.
  • Celtic Roots
  • Luminous Spirit
  • I Love Lucette
  • Unicorn
  • Neo-Medieval
  • The Duo Guersan
  • Early American Roots
  • Patchwork
  • Colonial America
  • The Banshee's Wail

As producer[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ New York Times review of Weill concert.
  2. ^ Early Music America
  3. ^ Review of "Tudor Rose" from the BBC

External links[edit]