Tina Theune

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Tina Theune
Personal information
Full name Christina Theune
Date of birth (1953-11-04) 4 November 1953 (age 64)
Place of birth Kleve, West Germany
Height 1.69 m (5 ft 6 12 in)
Playing position Midfielder
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1974–1986 Grün-Weiß Brauweiler
Teams managed
1996–2005 Germany
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Christina "Tina" Theune (born 4 November 1953, Kleve, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany) is a German graduate sports teacher, and the former national coach of the German women's national football team. After her marriage she bore the surname 'Theune-Meyer' until her divorce in 2008.

Biography[edit]

Theune was born into a sporting family. Her father was a track and field athlete, and her mother played handball.[1]

Career[edit]

She played from 1974 until 1986 for Grün-Weiß Brauweiler, where she was also later player-manager.

After she completed her teacher training, she became the first woman in Germany to acquire the DFB Fußball-Lehrer (coach) licence in 1985,[2] which is equivalent to the UEFA Pro license.[3]

In 1986 she became assistant coach to the women's national team, and succeeded Gero Bisanz as national coach on 1 August 1996 after the Summer Olympics in Atlanta. In total she won six European championships, three as an assistant to Gero Bisanz, three as national coach, and led the German women's team to victory in the 2003 Women's World Cup. After winning the UEFA Women's Championship in 2005, she retired from the position of national coach, as had already been announced, handing over to her assistant Silvia Neid.[4][5]

Successes[edit]

Germany Women

References[edit]

  1. ^ "'Nicer to train women' : The former head coach of the German women's football team tells Ghada Abd El-Kader what her job was like". Weekly.ahram.eg. Archived from the original on 2013-03-26. Retrieved 2012-09-03. 
  2. ^ "Theune-Meyer nimmt den Hut". Nach der EM ist Schluss (in German). n-tv.de. 2005-01-23. Retrieved 2013-10-07. 
  3. ^ "Hennes-Weisweiler-Akademie" (in German). Alle Rechte vorbehalten. Retrieved 2013-10-07. 
  4. ^ "Theune-Meyer praises progress". Fifa.com. Retrieved 2012-09-03. 
  5. ^ "Women's Coach Walks Off Field a Winner". Dw.de. Retrieved 2012-09-03. 

External links[edit]