Tingible body macrophage

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A tingible body macrophage is a type of macrophage predominantly found in germinal centers, containing many phagocytized, apoptotic cells in various states of degradation, referred to as tingible bodies (tingible meaning stainable).[1] Tingible body macrophages contain condensed chromatin fragments.[2]

It is thought that they may play a role in downregulating the germinal center reaction by the release of prostaglandins and hence a reduced B-cell induction of IL-2.[3]

Macrophages that contain debris from ingested lymphocytes are characteristic of a reactive follicular center in benign reactive lymphadenitis. Other accompanying signs of a benign follicular hyperplasia are well developed germinal centers with dark and light zones, in addition to numerous mitotic figures.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Horst Ibelgaufts' COPE: Cytokines & Cells Online Pathfinder Encyclopaedia > tingible body macrophages Retrieved on June 27, 2010
  2. ^ MacLennan I.C.M (1994). "Germinal Centers". Annual Review of Immunology. 12: 117–139. doi:10.1146/annurev.iy.12.040194.001001. PMID 8011279. 
  3. ^ Smith JP, Burton GF, Tew JG, Szakal AK (1998). "Tingible body macrophages in regulation of germinal center reactions.". Developmental Immunology. 6 (3-4): 285–294. doi:10.1155/1998/38923. PMC 2276033Freely accessible. PMID 9814602.