Tinidazole

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Tinidazole
Tinidazole.svg
Clinical data
Trade namesFasigyn, Simplotan, Tindamax
AHFS/Drugs.comMonograph
MedlinePlusa604036
Pregnancy
category
  • AU: B3
  • US: C (Risk not ruled out)
Routes of
administration
Oral
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
  • AU: S4 (Prescription only)
  • UK: POM (Prescription only)
  • US: ℞-only
Pharmacokinetic data
Protein binding12%
MetabolismHepatic (CYP3A4)
Elimination half-life12–14 hours
ExcretionUrine (20–25%), faeces (12%)
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEMBL
NIAID ChemDB
ECHA InfoCard100.039.089 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC8H13N3O4S
Molar mass247.273 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)
  (verify)

Tinidazole is a drug used against protozoan infections. It is widely known throughout Europe and the developing world as a treatment for a variety of amoebic and parasitic infections. It was developed in 1972 and is a prominent member of the nitroimidazole antibiotic class.[1]

Tinidazole is marketed by Mission Pharmacal under the brand name Tindamax, by Pfizer under the names Fasigyn and Simplotan, and in some Asian countries as Sporinex.

Uses[edit]

A large body of clinical data exists to support use of tinidazole for infections from amoebae, giardia, and trichomonas, just like metronidazole. Tinidazole may be a therapeutic alternative in the setting of metronidazole intolerance. Tinidazole may also be used to treat a variety of other bacterial infections (e.g., as part of combination therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication protocols).[2]

Side effects[edit]

Drinking alcohol while taking tinidazole causes an unpleasant disulfiram-like reaction, which includes nausea, vomiting, headache, increased blood pressure, flushing, and shortness of breath.

Half-life[edit]

Elimination half-life is 13.2 ± 1.4 hours. Plasma half-life is 12 to 14 hours.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ebel, K., Koehler, H., Gamer, A. O., & Jäckh, R. “Imidazole and Derivatives.” In Ullmann’s Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry; 2002 Wiley-VCH, doi:10.1002/14356007.a13_661
  2. ^ Edwards, David I. "Nitroimidazole drugs - action and resistance mechanisms. I. Mechanism of action" Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 1993, volume 31, pp. 9-20. doi:10.1093/jac/31.1.9.

External links[edit]