Tioga County, Pennsylvania

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Tioga County, Pennsylvania
Tioga County Courthouse Official.jpg
Tioga County Courthouse
Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Tioga County
Location in the state of Pennsylvania
Map of the United States highlighting Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania's location in the U.S.
Founded October 13, 1812
Named for Tioga River
Seat Wellsboro
Largest borough Mansfield
 • Total 1,137 sq mi (2,945 km2)
 • Land 1,134 sq mi (2,937 km2)
 • Water 3.2 sq mi (8 km2), 0.3%
 • (2010) 41,981
 • Density 37/sq mi (14/km²)
Congressional districts 5th, 10th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.tiogacountypa.us

Tioga County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 41,981.[1] Its county seat is Wellsboro.[2] The county was created on March 26, 1804, from part of Lycoming County[3] and later organized in 1812.[4] It is named for the Tioga River.


The county was originally settled by immigrants of "Yankee" stock (immigrants from New England and the western part of New York descended from the English Puritans whose ancestors settled New England in the colonial era). With the opening of a rough wagon road to the source of the Tioga River, New England settlers poured over the Allegheny Mountains. Tioga County resembled upstate New York more than it did Pennsylvania with its population primarily consisting of settlers from New England.[5] Roads were laid out, post routes established, public buildings erected and people were invited to move there. The original settlers were entirely of New England origins or were Yankees from upstate New York whose families had moved to that place from New England only one generation earlier, in the aftermath of the Revolutionary War. This resulted in Tioga County being culturally contiguous with early New England culture.


According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,137 square miles (2,940 km2), of which 1,134 square miles (2,940 km2) is land and 3.2 square miles (8.3 km2) (0.3%) is water.[6] It is the fourth-largest county in Pennsylvania by land area and fifth-largest by total area.

Adjacent counties[edit]


Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,687
1820 4,021 138.4%
1830 8,978 123.3%
1840 15,498 72.6%
1850 23,987 54.8%
1860 31,044 29.4%
1870 35,097 13.1%
1880 45,814 30.5%
1890 52,313 14.2%
1900 49,086 −6.2%
1910 42,829 −12.7%
1920 37,118 −13.3%
1930 31,871 −14.1%
1940 35,004 9.8%
1950 35,474 1.3%
1960 36,614 3.2%
1970 39,691 8.4%
1980 40,973 3.2%
1990 41,126 0.4%
2000 41,372 0.6%
2010 41,981 1.5%
Est. 2014 42,274 [7] 0.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790-1960[9] 1900-1990[10]
1990-2000[11] 2010-2013[1]

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 41,373 people, 15,925 households, and 11,195 families residing in the county. The population density was 36 people per square mile (14/km²). There were 19,893 housing units at an average density of 18 per square mile (7/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.11% White, 0.60% Black or African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.30% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.14% from other races, and 0.61% from two or more races. 0.52% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. Residents of Tioga County were of 31.9% English, 23.1% German , 10.1% Irish, 6.0% Polish and 5.3% Italian ancestry according to 2010 Community Survey.

There were 15,925 households out of which 30.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.80% were married couples living together, 8.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.70% were non-families. 24.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 2.93.

In the county, the population was spread out with 23.70% under the age of 18, 10.60% from 18 to 24, 25.40% from 25 to 44, 24.20% from 45 to 64, and 16.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 95.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.80 males.


Tioga County is one of the most Republican counties in Pennsylvania. This has a long history as Abraham Lincoln reportedly received 78.57% of the county's vote in the 1860 Presidential election.[13] Since Abraham Lincoln the county has voted for the non-Republican only two times. The first was Theodore Roosevelt's 1912 run as a Progressive and the second was Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964.[14] In 2004, George W. Bush received 12,019 votes (68%) to 5,437 votes (31%) for John Kerry. In 2008 John McCain received 62.7% of the vote.[15] In 2006, Rick Santorum and Lynn Swann both had significant victories in Tioga County despite their defeats statewide.


Map of Tioga County, Pennsylvania Public School Districts


Public school districts[edit]

Private schools[edit]

As reported by EdNA, Pennsylvania Department of Education, June 2010.

  • Covington Community DCC, Covington
  • Irvin Comstock Seventh-Day Adventist School, Wellsboro
  • Laurel Youth Services, Blossburg
  • Lauries Bright Beginnings CCC, Millerton
  • Mansfield Area Nursery School, Mansfield
  • Maranatha Mission Learning Community Branch 20, Trout Run
  • New Covenant Academy, Mansfield
  • Presbyterian Child Development Center, Wellsboro
  • Stony Fork Mennonite School, Wellsboro
  • Trinity Lutheran School, Wellsboro
  • Toddler University, Blossburg
  • Toddler University, Trinity
  • Wellsboro Montessori Children's Center, Wellsboro
  • Wesley Academy, Elkland


  • Blossburg Memorial Library
  • Elkland Area Community Library
  • Green Free Library - Wellsboro
  • Knoxville Public Library
  • Mansfield Free Public Library
  • Potter-Tioga County Lib System
  • Westfield Public Library


Public transportation is provided by Endless Mountains Transportation Authority.


There are three Pennsylvania state parks in Tioga County.


Map of Tioga County, Pennsylvania with Municipal Labels showing Boroughs (red) and Townships (white).

Under Pennsylvania law, there are four types of incorporated municipalities: cities, boroughs, townships, and, in at most two cases, towns. The following boroughs and townships are located in Tioga County:



Census-designated places[edit]

Census-designated places are geographical areas designated by the U.S. Census Bureau for the purposes of compiling demographic data. They are not actual jurisdictions under Pennsylvania law. Other unincorporated communities, such as villages, may be listed here as well.

Ghost town[edit]

See also[edit]


  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 22, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ An outline history of Tioga and Bradford counties in Pennsylvania, Chemung, Steuben, Tioga, Tompkins and Schuyler in New York: by townships, villages, boro's and cities, John L. Sexton. The Gazette Company, 1885, p3. Retrieved 2010-09-17. 
  4. ^ "Pennsylvania: Individual County Chronologies". Pennsylvania Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved March 13, 2015. 
  5. ^ The expansion of New England: the spread of New England settlement and institutions to the Mississippi River, 1620-1865 page 151-152
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 11, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 11, 2015. 
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved March 11, 2015. 
  10. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 24, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 11, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved March 11, 2015. 
  12. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  13. ^ David Leip Presidential Election Atlas for 1860
  14. ^ Geographie Electorale
  15. ^ The New York Times electoral map (Zoom in on Pennsylvania)

External links[edit]

  • Tioga County, Pennsylvania
  • Map 562 *Augmented by Williams, J. H., Taylor, L. E., and Low, D. J. (1993), Surficial geologic map of major glaciated valleys of Bradford, Tioga, and Potter Counties, Pennsylvania, showing locations of wells, test holes, and data-collection sites, Pennsylvania Geological Survey, 4th ser., Water Resource Report 68.

Coordinates: 41°46′N 77°15′W / 41.77°N 77.25°W / 41.77; -77.25