Titia (gens)

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The gens Titia was a plebeian family at Rome. The gens is rarely mentioned in the Republican period, and did not rise out of obscurity till a very late time. None of its members obtained the consulship under the Republic, and the first person of the name who held this office was Marcus Titius in BC 31.[1]

Origin[edit]

The nomen Titius is a patronymic surname, based on the praenomen Titus, which must have belonged to the ancestor of the gens. Titus was roughly the sixth-most common Latin praenomen throughout Roman history. However, it has been conjectured that it was introduced to Latin through Titus Tatius, a Sabine king in the time of Romulus, who came to Rome with many of his subjects. If Titus was originally a Sabine praenomen, then the Titii may have been Sabines. But it is also possible that Titus was common to both the Latin and Oscan tongues.[2][3][4]

Praenomina[edit]

The Titii used a wide variety of praenomina, including Gaius, Quintus, Sextus, Lucius, Publius, Marcus, and Titus. All of these were very common names.

Branches and cognomina[edit]

During the later years of the Republic, some of the Titii appear with the surnames Rufus, meaning "red" or "reddish", and Strabo, referring to one who squints. These may have been family-names, as at least two individuals in the gens bore these cognomina. Numerous surnames occur in imperial times, including Sabinus, Proculus, Aquilinus, and Gemellus, amongst others.[5][1]

Members[edit]

This list includes abbreviated praenomina. For an explanation of this practice, see filiation.

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, vol. III, p. 1157 ("Titia Gens").
  2. ^ Livy, i. 13.
  3. ^ De Praenominibus (epitome by Julius Paris)
  4. ^ Chase, p. 152.
  5. ^ Cassell's Latin and English Dictionary
  6. ^ Cicero, Brutus, 45.
  7. ^ Macrobius, ii. 9, 12.
  8. ^ Meyer, p. 203, ff. (2nd ed.).
  9. ^ Cassius Dio, Fragmenta 114, p. 46 (Reimar).
  10. ^ Cicero, De Oratore, ii. 11, 66; Pro Gaio Rabirio Perduellionis Reo, 9.
  11. ^ Eckhel, vol. V, p. 325.
  12. ^ Cicero, In Verrem, iv. 26.
  13. ^ Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares, xiii. 58.
  14. ^ Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares, xiii. 58.
  15. ^ Caesar, De Bello Civili, iii. 42.
  16. ^ Hirtius, De Bello Alexandrino, 57.
  17. ^ Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares, xii. 6.
  18. ^ Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares, xiii. 14.
  19. ^ Appian, Bellum Civile, iv. 7.
  20. ^ Cassius Dio, xlvi. 49.
  21. ^ Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares, x. 12. § 3, x. 21. § 3.
  22. ^ Cassius Dio, xlviii. 30.
  23. ^ Velleius Paterculus, ii. 83.
  24. ^ Horace, Epistulae, i. 3. 9-14.
  25. ^ Tacitus, Annales, iv. 18, 19, 68, 70, vi. 4.
  26. ^ Cassius Dio, lviii. 1.
  27. ^ Pliny the Elder, Naturalis Historia, viii. 40. s. 61.
  28. ^ Cassius Dio, lix. 18.
  29. ^ Tacitus, Annales, xi. 35.
  30. ^ Fasti Capitolini.
  31. ^ Fasti Capitolini.
  32. ^ Boissard]], Antiquitates Romanae, p. iii. fig. 132.
  33. ^ Sillig, Catalogus Artificium (1827), s. v.
  34. ^ Rochette, Lettre à M. Schorn, p. 419.

Bibliography[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainSmith, William, ed. (1870). "article name needed". Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology.