Helping Homeless Veterans Act of 2013

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Great Seal of the United States
Full title To amend title 38, United States Code, to expand the definition of homeless veteran for purposes of benefits under the laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, and for other purposes.
Introduced in 113th United States Congress
Introduced on February 12, 2013
Sponsored by Sen. Mark Begich (D, AK)
Number of co-sponsors 4
Effects and codifications
Act(s) affected McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act
U.S.C. section(s) affected 42 U.S.C. § 11302, 38 U.S.C. § 2002
Legislative history

The Helping Homeless Veterans Act of 2013 (S. 287), long title "To amend title 38, United States Code, to expand the definition of homeless veteran for purposes of benefits under the laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, and for other purposes," is a bill that would change the definition of "homeless veteran" to expand persons that are covered. The new definition would "allow a veteran or veterans’ family member fleeing domestic violence or sexual assault to be categorized as homeless in order to receive certain benefits offered by the Department of Veterans’ Affairs."[1] The law would increase the per diem payments that homeless veterans receive for assistance in finding a new home and authorize the payment of per diems to the dependents of homeless veterans.[2] It passed in the United States Senate during the 113th United States Congress.

Background[edit]

There is a related bill, H.R. 897, that was introduced into the United States House of Representatives during the 113th Congress.[1][3]

Provisions of the bill[edit]

This summary is based largely on the summary provided by the Congressional Research Service, a public domain source.[4]

The bill S. 287 would include in the formal definition of a homeless veteran, for purposes of eligibility for benefits through the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), a veteran or veteran's family fleeing domestic or dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, or other dangerous or life-threatening conditions in the current housing situation, including where the health and safety of children are jeopardized, there is no other residence, and there is a lack of resources or support networks to obtain other permanent housing.[4]

Congressional Budget Office report[edit]

This summary is based largely on the summary provided by the Congressional Budget Office, as ordered reported by the Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs on July 24, 2013. This is a public domain source.[5]

S. 287 would reauthorize and expand several programs for homeless veterans that are administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimated that implementing the bill would cost $842 million over the 2014–2018 period, assuming appropriation of the specified and estimated amounts.[5]

In addition, the CBO estimated that enacting the bill would decrease net direct spending by $294 million over the 2014–2023 period; therefore, pay-as-you-go procedures apply to the bill.[5] Enacting S. 287 would not affect revenues.

S. 287 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA).[5]

Procedural history[edit]

Senate[edit]

S. 287 was introduced into the Senate on February 12, 2013 by Sen. Mark Begich (D, AK).[6] It was referred to the United States Senate Committee on Veterans' Affairs, which held a hearing about the bill on May 9, 2013.[6] The bill was accompanied by Senate Report 113-110. The Senate voted by Unanimous consent on November 6, 2013 to pass the bill.[6]

Debate and discussion[edit]

The National Coalition for Homeless Veterans testified in favor of the bill on the May 9, 2013 hearings.[7]

See also[edit]

Notes/References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Cox, Ramsey (6 November 2013). "Senate approves bill redefining homeless veterans". The Hill. Retrieved 8 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Handyside, Heather (7 November 2013). "Senate Approves Begich Bill to Help Homeless Veterans". Alaska Native News. Retrieved 8 November 2013. 
  3. ^ "S. 287 Related Bills". United States Congress. Retrieved 8 November 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "S. 287 - Summary". United States Congress. Retrieved 8 November 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c d "CBO - S. 287". Congressional Budget Office. Retrieved 8 November 2013. 
  6. ^ a b c "S. 287 - All Actions". United States Congress. Retrieved 8 November 2013. 
  7. ^ Gornick, Matt. "National Coalition for Homeless Veterans Senate Committee on Veterans Affairs testimony" (PDF). National Coalition for Homeless Veterans. Retrieved 8 November 2013. 

External links[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Government.