Tochigiyama Moriya

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Tochigiyama Moriya
栃木山守也
Tochigiyama Moriya.jpg
Personal information
Born 横田 (中田) 守也
Yokoda (Nakata) Moriya
(1892-02-02)February 2, 1892
Tochigi, Japan
Died October 3, 1959(1959-10-03) (aged 67)
Height 1.72 m (5 ft 7 12 in)
Weight 104 kg (229 lb; 16.4 st)
Career
Stable Dewanoumi
Record 197-26-24
7draws-5holds (Total)
166-23-24
7draws-4holds (Makuuchi)
Debut February, 1911
Highest rank Yokozuna (February, 1918)
Retired May, 1925
Championships 9 (Makuuchi)
1 (Makushita)
* Up to date as of September 2007.

Tochigiyama Moriya (栃木山 守也, February 2, 1892 – October 3, 1959) was the 27th yokozuna in sumo wrestling from 1918 until 1925. Generally he is considered one of the pioneers of modern sumo.[1] He remains the lightest yokozuna in the history of sumo with a weight of 104 kg.[2]

Early career[edit]

Tochigiyama entered sumo in February 1911 but his coach Hitachiyama Taniemon didn't expect him to be strong owing to his light weight. However, he lost only 3 bouts on his way to the top makuuchi division, achieving promotion in January 1915. Tochigiyama defeated Tachiyama Mineemon, ending his series of 56 victories, on the 8th day of May 1916 tournament.

Tochigiyama was promoted to ōzeki in May 1917. After he won both championships on his two tournaments as ōzeki without suffering a single defeat, he was promoted to yokozuna in February 1918.

Yokozuna[edit]

Tochigiyama won his third championship at his first tournament as yokozuna. He also won the following two tournaments. He would go on to achieve five consecutive championships between May 1917 and May 1919.

Tochigiyama defeated other wrestlers with his strong oshi, or pushing techniques. He compensated for his lack of weight by training extremely hard. He was nicknamed the "little giant yokozuna".[3] Like Hitachiyama before him, he trained many wrestlers, such as later yokozuna Tamanishiki San'emon, even though they were not members of the Dewanoumi stable.

In May 1925, he suddenly retired after winning three consecutive championships between January 1924 and January 1925. Asked about his retirement, he stated that he wanted to retire while still a strong opponent.

Tochigiyama only lost 23 times while an active sumo wrestler in the top makuuchi division, and only eight times during his seven years in the yokozuna rank. His top division winning percentage was 87.8. In addition, his winning percentage as yokozuna reached 93.5, the fourth best in history after Jinmaku, Tachiyama and Tanikaze.[2][4]

Retirement from sumo[edit]

After his retirement, he was permitted to leave Dewanoumi stable and become the eighth head coach of Kasugano stable. He was the adopted son of the previous head coach, referee Kimura Soshiro. In his tenure, Tochigiyama produced yokozuna Tochinishiki Kiyotaka.

In June 1931, Tochigiyama took part in the first Dai-Nippon Rikishi Senshuken (大日本角力選手権), special sumo tournament. To the surprise of many, he defeated Tamanishiki and Tenryū, and won the championship.[3] In the modern age, retired wrestlers can no longer take part in any special sumo tournaments.

In 1952 he performed his kanreki dohyō-iri or '60th year ring entrance ceremony' to commemorate his years as yokozuna. His strength hardly declined long into his retirement. It is reported that Tochigiyama in his sixties easily carried a large hibachi which none of his other junior stable members could move.

He died suddenly in 1959 whilst still in charge of Kasugano stable. Tochinishiki, who Tochigiyama had in turn adopted as his son, took over as head coach of Kasugano stable.

Career record[edit]

Tochigayama Moriya[5]
- Spring Summer
1911 (Maezumo) Jonokuchi #29
5–0
 
1912 Jonidan #37
5–0
 
Sandanme #46
3–0
1h

 
1913 East Makushita #49
5–0
Champion

 
Makushita #11
4–1
 
1914 West Jūryō #10
4–1
 
East Jūryō #4
4–1
 
1915 East Maegashira #16
8–2
 
East Maegashira #2
5–4
1d

 
1916 East Maegashira #1
7–3
 
East Komusubi
6–3–1
 
1917 West Sekiwake
6–3–1
 
West Ōzeki
9–0
1h

 
1918 East Ōzeki
10–0
 
East Yokozuna
9–1
 
1919 East Yokozuna
9–0–1
 
East Yokozuna
10–0
 
1920 East Yokozuna
8–2
 
West Yokozuna
8–0
1d 1h

 
1921 West Yokozuna
9–0
1h

 
East Yokozuna
9–1
 
1922 East Yokozuna
8–1
1h

 
West Yokozuna
7–1–1
1d

 
1923 East Yokozuna
8–1
1d

 
West Yokozuna
1–0–9
1h

 
1924 West Yokozuna
9–0
1d

 
East Yokozuna
10–1
 
1925 East Yokozuna
10–0
1d

 
West Yokozuna
Retired
0–0–11
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Key:d=Draw(s) (引分);   h=Hold(s) (預り)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 人物「明治時代以降」栃木山守也 (in Japanese). Tochigi Prefecture. Retrieved 2008-05-25. [dead link]
  2. ^ a b "Complete List of Yokozuna". Sumo Colosseum. Retrieved 2008-07-03. 
  3. ^ a b 3横綱生んだ本県 (in Japanese). Yomiuri Shimbun. Retrieved 2008-07-04. 
  4. ^ Kuroda, Joe (February 2006). "A Shot At the Impossible-Yokozuna Comparison Through The Ages". sumofanmag.com. Retrieved 2008-07-03. 
  5. ^ "Tochigayama Moriya Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2013-06-11. 

External links[edit]

Previous:
Ōnishiki Uichirō
27th Yokozuna
February 1918 - May 1925
Next:
Ōnishiki Daigorō
Yokozuna is not a successive rank, and more than one wrestler can share the title