Togolese Americans

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Togolese Americans
Total population
1,716 (2000 US census)[1]
16,000 (Togolese-born. 2008-2012 American Community Survey Briefs)[2]
Languages

Togolese Americans are ethnic group of Americans of Togolese descent. According to answers provided to an open-ended question included in the 2000 census, 1,716 people said that their ancestry or ethnic origin was Togolese.[1] An unofficial estimate in 2008 of the Togolese American population was more than 2,500.[3]

History[edit]

The first people from present-day Togo who emigrated to what is now the United States arrived as slaves during the colonial period. This lasted until 1859, when Togolese-descended Cudjo Lewis arrived to Mobile from Dahomey.[4] After the abolition of slavery, few Togolese came to the United States.

Demography[edit]

Most Togolese who live in the United States are in the country legally and have received diversity immigrant visas,[3] which require them to show that they were not likely to become public charges before receiving the visas.[5] Many Togoleses emigrated to the U.S. to further their education.[3] Many Togolese reside in Chicago.[6]

Organizations[edit]

Togolese Americans have established the Association of Togolese Students in America (ATSA) in New York City,[7] the Association of Togolese in Chicagoland (ATC),[8] the Togolese Association of Baltimore (TAB) (in French, the Association des Togolais de Baltimore),[9] Nebraska Togolese Community Association, [10] and Togolese Americans United in New York City.[11]

ATSA seeks to increase awareness of the underserved children in Togo and elsewhere in Africa and to provide advice and resources for Togolese American students.[7] ATC "is as a nonprofit, apolitical, and nonreligious organization" that seeks to, among other things, promote "social, cultural, economic, educational, and scientific integration between members"; encourage "fraternal spirit and promote understanding and mutual acceptance among members"; provide assistance to Togolese Americans that are in need because of health, financial, or legal problems; enhance public awareness in the U.S. of the culture, history, and people of Togo; and combat discrimination, injustice, and disparities in the fields of employment, health, social services, and economic development.[8] TAB seeks to promote godly living and solidarity among Togolese Americans, "develop solidarity activities" throughout the world, and give moral and financial support and assistance to needy members of TAB.[9] Also Togolese Community of Tampa, Togolese Students Community -Florida.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Table 1. First, Second, and Total Responses to the Ancestry Question by Detailed Ancestry Code: 2000". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 4 July 2013.
  2. ^ Christine P. Gambino, Edward N. Trevelyan, and John Thomas Fitzwater. Issued October 2014. The Foreign-Born Population From Africa: 2008–2012.
  3. ^ a b c "Togolese immigrants work hard to give back to their communities", Quad-City Times, reported by Barb Ickes, 25 May 2008
  4. ^ "Question of the Month: Cudjo Lewis: Last African Slave in the U.S.?", by David Pilgrim, Curator, Jim Crow Museum, July 2005, webpage:Ferris-Clotilde.
  5. ^ "ilink". USCIS. Retrieved 13 August 2015.
  6. ^ "Togolese", Encyclopedia of Chicago, authored by Charles Adams Cogan, Nourou Yakoubou, and Ben Kokouvi Mensah.
  7. ^ a b "Association of Togolese Students in America". Retrieved 13 August 2015.
  8. ^ a b Association of Togolese in Chicagoland
  9. ^ a b "Togolese Association of Baltimore". Retrieved 13 August 2015.
  10. ^ Nebraska Togolese Community Association
  11. ^ "Togolese Americans United". Retrieved 13 August 2015.