Tokyo Ghoul (film)

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Tokyo Ghoul
Tokyoghoul2017poster2.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Japanese東京喰種 (トーキョーグール)
Directed byKentarō Hagiwara
Based onTokyo Ghoul
by Sui Ishida
StarringMasataka Kubota
Fumika Shimizu
Yū Aoi
Nobuyuki Suzuki [ja]
Yo Oizumi
Music byDon Davis
Production
company
Geek Sight
Distributed byShochiku
Release date
  • 29 July 2017 (2017-07-29) (Japan)
Running time
120 minutes
CountryJapan
LanguageJapanese
Box office$10 million

Tokyo Ghoul (Japanese: 東京喰種 (トーキョーグール), Hepburn: Tōkyō Gūru) is a 2017 Japanese dark fantasy action horror film based on the manga series Tokyo Ghoul by Sui Ishida.[1][2] The film is directed by Kentarō Hagiwara and stars Masataka Kubota as Ken Kaneki and Fumika Shimizu as Tōka Kirishima.[2] It was released in Japan by Shochiku on 29 July 2017.[2][3]

Plot[edit]

Tokyo Ghoul is set in an alternate reality where ghouls, individuals who can only survive by eating human flesh, live among the normal humans in secret, hiding their true nature to evade pursuit from the authorities.

Ken Kaneki, a normal college student who, after being taken to a hospital, discovers that he underwent a surgery that transformed him into a half-ghoul after being attacked by his date, Rize Kamishiro who reveals herself to be a ghoul. This was accomplished by transferring Rize's organs into his body, and now, like normal ghouls, he must consume human flesh to survive. Struggling with his new life as a half-ghoul, he must now adapt into the ghoul society, as well as keeping his identity hidden from his human companions.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Principal photography lasted from July to September 2016.[2]

Reception[edit]

Box office[edit]

The film grossed ¥1.1 billion ($9.81 million) in Japan.[4][5] Overseas, it grossed US$71,222 in Australia and New Zealand,[6] and $21,177 in Thailand,[7] for a worldwide total of $10 million.

Home media[edit]

On home video, the film's DVD and Blu-ray releases have generated sales of $121,000 in the United States.[8]

Critical reception[edit]

On review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, the film holds an approval rating of 79% based on 14 reviews, with an average rating of 6.3/10.[9]

Gabriella Ekens from Anime News Network was impressed by film's cinematography even though it didn't have a huge budget and praised Masataka Kubota and other cast for their strong performance. Although he criticized film for its Kagune effects.[10] Mark Schilling of The Japan Times gave the film 4.5 out of 5 stars.[11] Andrew Chan of the Film Critics Circle of Australia writes, "Tokyo Ghoul is one of those films where the over the top gore and violence ends up over shadowing everything from plot line to meaningful words or even its characters."[12] Dread Central gave the film three and a half stars and called the film "A beautiful but flawed adaptation."[13] Variety said "This live-action adaptation of Sui Ishida’s famous manga about flesh-eating monsters is likely to please fans, despite some technical imperfections."[14] South China Morning Post found the film ambitious but felt it ultimately stumbled saying "The film collapses into a series of conventional stand-offs between opposing characters struggling as much with their own identities as their conflicts with each other. For about an hour, however, Tokyo Ghoul did offer something special."[15] Film School Rejects said "It feels like a film designed for newcomers, but it ultimately fails to leave viewers hungry for more."[16]

Sequel[edit]

On September 22, 2018, it was announced that a sequel titled Tokyo Ghoul 2 was green-lit for a 2019 release. Maika Yamamoto will be replacing Fumika Shimizu in her role as Tōka Kirishima.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "東京喰種(2017)". allcinema (in Japanese). Stingray. Retrieved 13 December 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Live-Action Tokyo Ghoul Film's Visual Teases Kaneki With Ghoul Mask". Anime News Network. 12 December 2016. Retrieved 13 December 2016.
  3. ^ "東京喰種". eiga.com (in Japanese). Retrieved 13 December 2016.
  4. ^ "New Photo Shows Masataka Kubota as Kaneki on the Set of the Tokyo Ghoul Live-Action Sequel". Moshi Moshi Nippon. 21 November 2018. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  5. ^ "2017". Eiren. Motion Picture Producers Association of Japan. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  6. ^ "Tôkyô gûru (2017) - International". The Numbers. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  7. ^ "Thailand Box Office, October 12–15, 2017". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  8. ^ "Tôkyô gûru (2017) - Financial Information". The Numbers. Retrieved 9 February 2019.
  9. ^ "Tokyo Ghoul (Tôkyô gûru) (2017)". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango. Retrieved 2018-07-04.
  10. ^ "Tokyo Ghoul (Live-Action) - Review". Anime News Network. July 6, 2017. Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  11. ^ Schilling, Mark (July 26, 2017). "'Tokyo Ghoul' will have you wondering who the real monsters are". The Japan Times. Retrieved August 25, 2017.
  12. ^ Andrew Chan (29 August 2017). "Tokyo Ghoul". [Neo Film Reviews].
  13. ^ Barkan, Jonathan (2017-10-13). "Tokyo Ghoul Review: A Beautiful But Flawed Adaptation". Dread Central. Retrieved 2017-10-14.
  14. ^ Kuipers, Richard (2017-10-14). "Film Review: 'Tokyo Ghoul'". Variety. Retrieved 2017-10-14.
  15. ^ Marsh, James (2017-08-29). "Film review: Tokyo Ghoul – grisly fantasy adapted from manga by Sui Ishida is bound by mainstream conventions". South China Morning Post. Retrieved 2017-10-14.
  16. ^ Hunter, Rob (2017-07-18). "Fantasia 2017 Review: 'Tokyo Ghoul' Has Fun With Fleshy Bits But Fails to Leave You Hungry for More". Film School Rejects. Retrieved 2017-10-14.
  17. ^ Ressler, Karen (September 22, 2018). "Tokyo Ghoul Gets 2nd Live-Action Film in 2019". Anime News Network. Retrieved September 23, 2018.

External links[edit]