Tokyo RPG Factory

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Tokyo RPG Factory Co., Ltd.
Private
IndustryVideo game
Founded2014; 5 years ago (2014)
HeadquartersTokyo, Japan
Key people
Atsushi Hashimoto
Jun Suzuki
ParentSquare Enix
Websitewww.tokyorpgfactory.com

Tokyo RPG Factory Co., Ltd. (株式会社Tokyo RPG Factory) is a Japanese video game developer and a subsidiary of Square Enix.

History[edit]

In 2014, Square Enix formed a new development studio named "Tokyo Dream Factory". During Square Enix press conference at E3 2015, the publisher announced at the show the establishment of a new studio called Tokyo RPG Factory. According to the company, this new subsidiary was created to focus on the creation of JRPGs, mainly the ones inspired on the games the company made on the 90s. At the same event, Square Enix announced Project Setsuna, the first game of the studio which would be called I Am Setsuna on the final release.[1][2]

In 2017, Square Enix announced Lost Sphear, a spiritual successor to I Am Setsuna and a new game from the studio to be released on the same year in Japan, while in 2018 for the West. In 2019 during a Nintendo Direct, Square Enix announced a new game from the studio called Oninaki for release in 2019 in Japan and the West.[3][4]

Games[edit]

Year Title Platform(s)
2016 I Am Setsuna PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, Nintendo Switch, Microsoft Windows
2017 Lost Sphear PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, Microsoft Windows
2019 Oninaki PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, Microsoft Windows

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kleckner, Stephen (2015-06-16). "Square Enix unveils Tokyo RPG Factory studio and Project Setsuna, its first game". Venturebeat. Retrieved 25 June 2019.
  2. ^ Romano, Sal (2014-09-05). "Square Enix opening new console RPG studio". Gematsu. Retrieved 25 June 2019.
  3. ^ "How Lost Sphear continues the surprise revival of classic Japanese RPGs". 2017-07-25. Archived from the original on 2017-10-24.
  4. ^ O'Connor, Alice (30 May 2017). "I Am Setsuna devs announce Lost Sphear". Archived from the original on 24 October 2017.

External links[edit]