Tollhouse, California

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Coordinates: 37°01′08″N 119°23′57″W / 37.01889°N 119.39917°W / 37.01889; -119.39917

Tollhouse
Tollhouse in 1972
Tollhouse in 1972
Tollhouse is located in California
Tollhouse
Tollhouse
Location in California
Tollhouse is located in the US
Tollhouse
Tollhouse
Tollhouse (the US)
Coordinates: 37°01′08″N 119°23′57″W / 37.01889°N 119.39917°W / 37.01889; -119.39917
CountryUnited States
StateCalifornia
CountyFresno County
Elevation1,919 ft (585 m)

Tollhouse (formerly, Toll House) is an unincorporated community in Fresno County, California.[1] It lies at an elevation of 1,919 feet (585 m).[1] Tollhouse is located in the Sierra Nevada, 7 miles (11 km) southwest of Shaver Lake.[2] It is home to 2,089 people[3].

The town was created in the 1860s around a lumber mill. The name "tollhouse" comes from the fact that the community was also built up in connection to a now-defunct toll road running up the steep slopes of Sarver Peak to Pineridge and housed a toll house.

The ZIP Code is 93667, and the community is inside area code 559.

The first post office opened in Tollhouse in 1876, closed in 1884, re-opened in 1885.[2] The last toll on the toll road was collected in 1878.[2]

Nearby small towns include Auberry, Prather, and Shaver.

Tollhouse is the tribal headquarters for the Cold Springs Rancheria of Mono Indians of California.[4]

Notable residents[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Tollhouse include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Tollhouse, California
  2. ^ a b c Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Clovis, Calif.: Word Dancer Press. p. 1118. ISBN 1-884995-14-4.
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ Cold Springs Rancheria of Mono Indians. Indigenous Internet Chamber of Commerce Business Directory. (retrieved 24 July 2009)
  5. ^ Brown, Emma. "George 'Elfie' Ballis, 85, who photographed struggle of Cesar Chávez and migrant farmworkers, dies", The Washington Post, September 27, 2010. Accessed September 29, 2010.

External links[edit]