Tom Brooke

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Tom Brooke (born 1978 in London) is an English actor.

Early life[edit]

He is the son of actor Paul Brooke. Brooke attended Alleyn's School in Dulwich, London and Hull University. He trained at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art.

Career[edit]

Brooke played Bill Wiggins in series 3 of BBC's Sherlock, Lame Lothar Frey in season 3 of HBO's Game of Thrones,[1] and is currently portraying Fiore in AMC's Preacher.[2][3]

In 2011 Brooke played the dimwitted Lee in Jez Butterworth's much garlanded play Jerusalem at The Royal Court theatre to great acclaim. The following year he reprised the role in the play's first West End run at The Apollo, although he was replaced by Johnny Flynn thereafter, since he had been cast in the title role of the National Theatre's revival of Arnold Wesker's The Kitchen to critical plaudits, although the reviews of the production were not quite so favourable.

Filmography[edit]

Film[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
2004 Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason Production Assistant
2009 The Young Victoria Man on Soap Box
2009 The Boat That Rocked Thick Kevin
2011 The Veteran Danny Turner

Television[edit]

2009 Hustle Diamond expert Series 5,Episode 4 - Diamond Seeker
2010 Thorne: Scaredycat Martin Palmer
2012 The Hollow Crown: Henry V Nym
2013 Game of Thrones "Lame" Lothar Frey
2013 Agatha Christie's Poirot: The Big Four Lawrence Boswell Tysoe
2014 - 2017 Sherlock Bill Wiggins 2 episodes
2016 Preacher Fiore
2017 Philip K. Dick’s Electric Dreams Episode: "The Commuter"

Awards[edit]

Brooke received the TMA Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in The Long and the Short and the Tall at the Sheffield Lyceum in 2006.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tom Brooke joins Game of Thrones". Winter is Coming. 2 August 2012. Retrieved 28 September 2016. 
  2. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (20 May 2015). "Tom Brooke Cast In AMC Pilot ‘Preacher’". deadline.com. Retrieved 28 September 2016. 
  3. ^ "Anatol Yusef And Tom Brooke On Playing Preacher's Strangest Duo DeBlanc And Fiore". Pop Culture Now. Retrieved 28 September 2016. 

External links[edit]