Tom McNamara (golfer)

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Tom McNamara
Tom McNamara 1915.jpg
McNamara at the 1915 U.S. Open
Personal information
Full name Thomas Lawrence McNamara, Sr.
Nickname Tommy Mac
Born (1882-11-18)November 18, 1882
Brookline, Massachusetts
Died July 21, 1939(1939-07-21) (aged 56)
Mount Vernon, New York
Nationality  United States
Spouse Mary Ellen Jones
Children 7
Career
Status Professional
Professional wins 7
Best results in major championships
Masters Tournament DNP
U.S. Open 2nd: 1909, 1912, 1915
The Open Championship 25th: 1913
PGA Championship T9: 1919

Thomas Lawrence McNamara, Sr. (November 18, 1882 – July 21, 1939)[1] was an American professional golfer.

Biography[edit]

McNamara was born in Brookline, Massachusetts to an immigrant Irish family.[1] His parents were Thomas McNamara (1841–1909) and Mariah McNamara née Curry (1851–1940).[2]

McNamara was the head professional at Wollaston Golf Club. During the 1909 U.S. Open, McNamara became the first man ever to break 70 in a competitive American tournament.[3] McNamara held a three-stroke lead in the 1909 U.S. Open heading to the back nine.[3] Due to the extremely hot temperatures, McNamara suffered a heatstroke on the 14th hole. After doctors treated him, he insisted on finishing the tournament. He succeeded in finishing, but his game collapsed down the stretch and finished second.[3] The following year, 1910, he served as the head golf professional at the Fall River Country Club in Fall River, Massachusetts. McNamara was considered one of American's best homegrown professionals during the early twentieth century. He was head professional at Siwanoy Country Club in Bronxville, New York. He proposed the idea of a national tournament to his boss, Rodman Wanamaker. McNamara was the manager of the golf department in Wanamaker's New York City department store.[4][better source needed] Thus came the PGA Championship, first played in 1916 at Siwanoy Country Club.[5]

Family[edit]

McNamara was born to Thomas McNamara (1841–1909) and Mariah McNamara née Curry (1851–1940).[2] McNamara and his wife Mary had seven children.[2]

Death[edit]

McNamara died, from coronary thrombosis,[2] at his home in Mount Vernon, New York on July 21, 1939.[1]

Tournament wins[edit]

this list may be incomplete

Results in major championships[edit]

Tournament 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909
U.S. Open 39 CUT T20 DNP 14 T10 2
The Open Championship DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
PGA Championship NYF NYF NYF NYF NYF NYF NYF
Tournament 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919
U.S. Open T5 T29 2 T16 T13 2 T15 NT NT T3
The Open Championship DNP DNP DNP 25 DNP NT NT NT NT NT
PGA Championship NYF NYF NYF NYF NYF NYF R32 NT NT R16
Tournament 1920 1921 1922
U.S. Open DNP DNP DNP
The Open Championship DNP DNP DNP
PGA Championship DNP DNP R64

Note: The Masters Tournament was not founded until 1934.
NYF = Tournament not yet founded
NT = No tournament
DNP = Did not play
CUT = missed the half-way cut
R64, R32, R16, QF, SF = Round in which player lost in PGA Championship match play
"T" indicates a tie for a place
Yellow background for top-10

Team appearances[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Stevens, Peter F. (March 28, 2008). Hidden History of the Boston Irish. Charleston, South Carolina: The History Press. pp. 117–9. ISBN 978-1-59629-450-9. Retrieved 2010-02-25. 
  2. ^ a b c d "McNamara Ancestry". http://www.ancestry.com.  External link in |website= (help);
  3. ^ a b c Frost, Mark (2002). The Greatest Game Ever Played. New York, New York: Hyperion. pp. 62–63. ISBN 0-7868-6920-8. 
  4. ^ "Tom Kerrigan Passport". http://www.ancestry.com. United States of America. Retrieved May 3, 2015.  External link in |website= (help)
  5. ^ Memorable Moments in the PGA Championship
  6. ^ "Tom McNamara Wins Metropolitan Championship". Fitchburg Daily Sentinel. July 12, 1912. Retrieved February 22, 2015.