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Tom Scott
Scott in 2016
Personal information
Born
Thomas Scott

1984 or 1985 (age 38–39)
EducationUniversity of York
OccupationYouTuber
Websitetomscott.com
YouTube information
Channel
Years active2006–present
Genres
  • Education
  • science
  • comedy
Subscribers6.44 million (main channel)
7.79 million (combined)[b][1]
Total views1.762 billion (main channel)
1.87 billion (combined)[a][1]
100,000 subscribers2014
1,000,000 subscribers2017

Last updated: 17 June 2024

Thomas Scott (born 1984 or 1985) is an English YouTuber and web developer. On his self-titled YouTube channel, Scott creates educational videos across a range of topics including history, geography, linguistics, science, and technology. As of June 2024, his five YouTube channels have collectively gained over 7.79 million subscribers[b] and 1.87 billion views.[a][2]

Born in Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, Scott first came to media attention as a student, creating a parody of a governmental website. He created his channel in 2006, but only began to enjoy mainstream popularity after 2014, when he began his education series "Things You Might Not Know". Scott produces and uploads educational videos to the channel across a range of topics including linguistics, technology, geography, history and science. His output has included series such as Language Files (which focuses on linguistics and languages), The Basics (computing and IT), Amazing Places (geographical locations), and Things You Might Not Know. Typically his videos take the form of relatively short videos on interesting items, with many having received external coverage including colours unable to be recorded accurately on video,[3] compact hovercraft,[4] and how bear-resistant infrastructure is tested.[5]

Scott has also collaborated with other YouTubers.[6] He announced that he was taking a break from his YouTube work starting January 2024, after a decade of consistent weekly uploads.[7]

Early life

Scott as "Mad Cap'n Tom" in 2010

Thomas Scott[8][9][10] was born in 1984 or 1985[8][11] in Mansfield, Nottinghamshire,[8] and graduated from the University of York with a degree in linguistics and the English language.[8][12] He later earned a Master of Arts in educational studies.[13]

In 2004, when Scott was 19 and at university, he produced a website parodying the British government's "Preparing for Emergencies" website,[14] including a section explaining what to do in case of a zombie apocalypse. This resulted in the Cabinet Office demanding the site be deleted, to which Scott sent a "polite response declining to take down the site".[9][10][15]

In 2009, Scott became the official UK organiser of International Talk Like a Pirate Day,[16] and was subsequently nominated by his friends to run for student president at the University of York Students' Union, under the guise of his Talk Like a Pirate Day persona, "Mad Cap'n Tom Scott". Despite running as a joke, he gained almost 3,000 votes, won the election, and served as the organisation's 48th president.[17] When running for Parliament in the Cities of London and Westminster constituency as a joke candidate in 2010, Scott used the character – at the time, he described his chances of winning in the safe Conservative seat of Westminster as "Somewhere 'twixt a snowball's chance in hell an' zero."[18] He received 84 votes (0.2% of the total), finishing in last place behind Pirate Party UK.[19]

Career

Early career

In 2012 Scott was a presenter in the Sky 1 series Gadget Geeks alongside Colin Furze and Creative Technologist Charles Yarnold, where he was responsible for the creation of software solutions.[20]

Scott received coverage in 2013 for "Actual Facebook Graph Searches", a Tumblr site which exposed a potentially embarrassing and dangerous collection of public Facebook data using Facebook's Graph Search, such as showing men in Tehran who have said that they were "interested in men" or "single women who live nearby and are interested in men and like getting drunk".[21]

YouTube career

Scott produces and uploads educational videos to the channel across a range of topics including linguistics, technology, geography, history and science. His output has included series such as Language Files (which focuses on linguistics and languages), The Basics (which covers issues to do with computing and IT), Amazing Places (which, as the name suggests, focuses on geographical locations), and Things You Might Not Know. Typically his videos take the form of relatively short videos on interesting items, with many having received external coverage including colours unable to be recorded accurately on video,[3] compact hovercraft,[4] and how bear-resistant infrastructure is tested.[5]

Scott has also collaborated with other YouTubers, including challenging YouTuber Jordan Harrod to create a deepfake version of him for $100.[6]

Scott announced that he was taking a break from his YouTube work starting 1 January 2024, after a decade of consistent weekly uploads. "I am so tired. There's nothing in my life right now except work" he explained, although it was his "dream job". Scott believed YouTube made it impossible to reduce the quality of his videos. Thus he saw his only other option as expanding further and hiring staff, forcing him to "become a manager", which he deemed beyond his skills. Soon after, he noted that other YouTubers with similar long-form content were also reducing or stepping away as views and ad-revenue fall. Scott predicted "difficult years" ahead given the rise of "junk zero-effort generative AI channels" and competing video options.[7][22][23]

The Technical Difficulties

Scott is a member of the four-person comedy troupe, The Technical Difficulties, with whom he hosted a radio show of the same name on University Radio York which won the Kevin Greening award at the Student Radio Awards in 2008.[24] The group consists of Scott, Matthew James Bartholomew Gray (born (1986-01-02)2 January 1986),[25] Gary Brannan (born (1982-10-04)4 October 1982[26]) and Christopher Joel.[27] The group has created several podcasts and video series over the years including:[28]

Series Duration
The Reverse Trivia Podcast 2010–2014
Citation Needed 2014–2018
Two of These People Are Lying 2019–2021
Adventures 2022–

Lateral with Tom Scott

A weekly comedy podcast taking the format of a game show where Scott and three contestants take turns asking each other difficult questions that require lateral thinking to answer, which was adapted from a 2018 six-episode game show on Scott's main YouTube channel that was also co-developed with David Bodycombe.[29][30][31]

Scott has kept the podcast going into 2024 despite indefinitely pausing his weekly YouTube release schedule.[32]

Other work

Scott at dConstruct in 2014

In 2014, Scott co-founded Emojli along with Matt Gray. It was a parody emoji-only social network inspired by Yo. Emojli was described by Salon as "an inside joke turned into reality".[33][34] It closed in July 2015 after it became too expensive to maintain.[35] In September 2015, Scott created a full-size emoji keyboard out of fourteen standard keyboards to type every standard Unicode emoji.[36]

Scott worked for the Daily Mirror's UsVsTh3m creating Flash games,[37] some of which he continues to maintain on his personal website.[38]

Other web apps Scott has created include "Evil", a web app that revealed the phone numbers of Facebook users;[39][40] "Tweleted", which showed posts deleted from Twitter;[41] "What's Osama bin Watchin?", which mashed together an image of Osama bin Laden with YouTube Internet memes;[42] "Parliament WikiEdits", a Twitter bot that tweets whenever an IP address from the Houses of Parliament edited Wikipedia, which inspired a wave of similar accounts including CongressEdits;[43] and "Klouchebag", a satire of the social media rankings site Klout.[44][45]

In December 2022, Scott appeared in two episodes of Christmas University Challenge as captain of the University of York team.[46]

Production company

Pad 26 Limited
Company typePrivate company limited by shares
Founded6 November 2018; 5 years ago (2018-11-06)
FounderThomas Scott
HeadquartersAmelia House, Crescent Road, ,
United Kingdom, BN11 1QR
Key people
Thomas Scott (Founder and Director)
ParentExternal Tank Limited
Websitepad26.com

On 6 November 2018, Scott founded Pad 26 Limited,[47][48] a company offering content production, format development, and YouTube consultancy.[49] Scott also used the company to handle his YouTube channel.[50] The company was a standalone company until 3 January 2020.[51] It is now a wholly owned subsidiary of External Tank Limited,[52] a holding company wholly owned by Scott.[53]

Accolades

In 2022, Scott won the Streamy Award for Learning and Education.[54] He was nominated in the same category in 2023.[55]

Discography

Singles

List of singles, with selected details
Title Artist(s) Year Ref(s)
"On a Pirate Ship" Jay Foreman featuring Mad Cap'n Tom 2007 [56]
"Shelter Me from the Rain" Beardyman featuring MC HyperScott 2022 [57][58]

Electoral history

General election 2010: Cities of London and Westminster[59]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Mark Field 19,264 52.2 +3.9
Labour Dave Rowntree 8,188 22.2 −3.1
Liberal Democrats Naomi Smith 7,574 20.5 +2.0
Green Derek Chase 778 2.1 −2.2
UKIP Paul Weston 664 1.8 +0.7
English Democrat Frank Roseman 191 0.5 New
Independent Dennis Delderfield 98 0.3 New
Pirate Jack Nunn 90 0.2 New
Independent Mad Cap'n Tom (Scott)[60] 84 0.2 New
Majority 11,076 30.0 +7.8
Turnout 36,931 55.5 +4.4
Registered electors 66,849
Conservative hold Swing +3.5

Notes

  1. ^ a b Views, broken down by channel:
    • 1.762 billion (Tom Scott)
    • 48.29 million (Tom Scott Plus)
    • 44.94 million (Matt and Tom)
    • 3.13 million (The Technical Difficulties)
    • 13.56 million (Lateral with Tom Scott)
  2. ^ a b Subscribers, broken down by channel:
    • 6.44 million (Tom Scott)
    • 255 thousand (Matt and Tom)
    • 831 thousand (Tom Scott Plus)
    • 158 thousand (The Technical Difficulties)
    • 112 thousand (Lateral with Tom Scott)

References

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    "Matt and Tom's YouTube Stats (Summary Profile) – Social Blade Stats". Social Blade. Archived from the original on 8 March 2023. Retrieved 30 December 2022.
    "Tom Scott plus's YouTube Stats (Summary Profile) – Social Blade Stats". Social Blade. Archived from the original on 30 December 2022. Retrieved 30 December 2022.
    "The Technical Difficulties's YouTube Stats (Summary Profile) – Social Blade Stats". Social Blade. Archived from the original on 30 December 2022. Retrieved 30 December 2022.
    "Lateral with Tom Scott's YouTube Stats (Summary Profile) – Social Blade Stats". Social Blade. Archived from the original on 30 December 2022. Retrieved 30 December 2022.
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  27. ^ Scott, Thomas; Gray, Matthew James Bartholomew; Brannan, Gary; Joel, Christopher (21 March 2020). Tech Dif Make Ice Cream - Will It Soft Serve? (Video). Matt and Tom. Event occurs at 0:29. Retrieved 10 July 2024 – via YouTube. Mr Christopher Joel
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  38. ^ Scott, Thomas. "Six Old UsVsTh3m Games". tomscott.com. Archived from the original on 3 November 2022. Retrieved 13 November 2022.
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  52. ^ "Confirmation statement made on 5 November 2020 with updates". Companies House. 18 November 2020. Retrieved 14 July 2024.
  53. ^ "Confirmation statement made on 18 November 2020 with updates". Companies House. 19 November 2020. Retrieved 14 July 2024.
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  56. ^ Foreman, Jay; Scott, Thomas (3 September 2007). On a Pirate Ship. Archived from the original on 3 July 2023. Retrieved 14 June 2023 – via YouTube.
  57. ^ Foreman, Darren Alexander; Scott, Thomas (5 March 2022). "Shelter Me From the Rain". Tidal. Archived from the original on 14 June 2023. Retrieved 14 June 2023.
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  59. ^ "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  60. ^ Scott, Tom; Gray, Matt (1 April 2016). The Ballad of Mad Cap'n Tom, Part 2 (Vlog). Matt and Tom. Archived from the original on 13 December 2021. Retrieved 1 June 2020 – via YouTube.

External links