Tom Tucker: The Man and His Dream

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
"Tom Tucker: The Man and His Dream"
Family Guy episode
Episode no. Season 10
Episode 13
Directed by Greg Colton
Written by Alex Carter
Production code 9ACX10
Original air date February 12, 2012
Guest actors
Episode chronology
← Previous
"Livin' on a Prayer"
Next →
"Be Careful What You Fish For"
Family Guy (season 10)
List of Family Guy episodes

"Tom Tucker: The Man and His Dream" is the thirteenth episode of the tenth season of the animated comedy series Family Guy. The episode originally aired on Fox in the United States on February 12, 2012. In this episode, Peter decides to help Tom Tucker realize his dream to become a famous actor, so he becomes his agent as they go to Hollywood. But, there, they cross paths with a resurrected James Woods. Back in Quahog, Chris dates a girl who looks disturbingly like Lois. The name mimicks the name of a 1988 film Tucker: The Man and His Dream.

This episode was written by Alex Carter and directed by Greg Colton. It received mostly positive reviews from critics for its storyline and cultural gags. It featured guest performances from Mark Harmon, David Herman, Christine Lakin, Sanaa Lathan, Ellen Page, and James Woods, along with several recurring guest voice actors for the series.

The episode was dedicated to Ricky Garduno, a storyboard artist for the show.

Plot[edit]

While watching Tom Tucker on Channel 5 News, Peter learns that Tucker used to be an actor under the stage name George P. Wilbur, the actor who portrayed Michael Myers in Peter's favorite movie, Halloween 4. Later, Peter offers to become Tucker's agent to get him famous, but Tom refuses until an inane news story makes him reconsider. Tucker stars as a minor character in an episode of NCIS playing a mechanic that Leroy Jethro Gibbs questions.

After that minor appearance which Peter and Tom watch in their hotel room, thought-to-be-dead actor James Woods appears much to the surprise of Peter and Tom. James Woods reveals that after his death in "And Then There Were Fewer," his body was identified by a paramedic and rushed to a top secret science lab in Hollywood where he was resurrected upon the life-force of a teenage girl being drained into him. Peter decides to become Woods' agent after firing Tucker. However, after reading scripts sponsored by Peter, Woods, who turns out to be a high-maintenance man himself, fires him. Peter returns to Tucker, they forgive each other, and decide to return to Quahog, where Tom successfully gets his job back.

Back in Quahog, Chris starts dating a girl named Lindsey, who looks disturbingly similar to Lois. However, Lois does not seem to realize that they look the same until spotting Lindsey making out with another guy while out for coffee with Bonnie. Lois breaks the news to Chris, who does not mind. Chris says that he is fat just like Peter and wants a girl who accepts him, just like Lois accepts Peter. However, Lois assures Chris that any girl will be lucky to date him. Soon after breaking up with Chris, Lindsey starts dating Quagmire who makes her dress as Lois for participation in a sex fantasy and dismisses Mort, who is also dressed as Lois, as the episode ends.

Reception[edit]

In its original broadcast on February 12, 2012, "Tom Tucker: The Man and His Dream" was watched by 5.03 million U.S. viewers and acquired a 2.5/5 rating in the 18–49 demographic, according to Nielsen ratings.[1]

Kevin McFarland of The A.V. Club gave the episode a B+, saying "At a certain point it’s just not fair to compare Family Guy to The Simpsons. But when Family Guy eases into an A-plot designed around a fringe character like tonight, which features Quahog news anchor extraordinaire Tom Tucker, it’s hard for me not to think of great Simpsons episodes centered around non-Simpson family characters like Barney, Moe, Apu, Mr. Burns, and countless others. My gut reaction is that I don’t care about very many of the fringe characters on Family Guy, or even many of the members of the Griffin family for that matter, so I didn’t really trust that we’d get anything too enlightening. I was probably about two-thirds right with that prediction, since this episode had some pretty great jokes sprinkled throughout a relatively uninteresting attempt to include Tom Tucker in a more central role for the first time in a while."[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gorman, Bill (2012-02-14). "Sunday Final Ratings: 'Napoleon Dynamite,' 'American Dad' Adjusted Up; '60 Minutes' Adjusted Down + 'Grammy Awards' Finals". TV by the Numbers. Retrieved 2012-06-23. 
  2. ^ McFarland, Kevin (2012-02-12). "“Tom Tucker: The Man And His Dream”". Avclub.com. Retrieved 2015-07-18. 

External links[edit]