Tomoka Shibasaki

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Tomoka Shibasaki
Native name 柴崎友香
Born (1973-10-20) October 20, 1973 (age 44)
Osaka, Japan
Occupation Novelist
Language Japanese
Alma mater Osaka Prefecture University
Genre Fiction
Notable works
  • Haru no niwa (春の庭)
  • Sono machi no ima wa (その街の今は)
  • Kyō no dekigoto (きょうのできごと)
Notable awards
Website
Novelist: Tomoka Shibasaki

Tomoka Shibasaki (柴崎友香, Shibasaki Tomoka, born October 20, 1973) is a Japanese writer from Osaka. She has won the Noma Literary New Face Prize and the Akutagawa Prize, and two of her works have been adapted for film.

Career[edit]

Shibasaki was born in Osaka, Japan. She graduated from Osaka Prefecture University and held an office job for four years while writing fiction.[1] In 1999 she published her first short story, "Reddo, ierō, orenji, burū" ("Red, Yellow, Orange, Blue").[2] Her first novel, Kyō no dekigoto (A Day on the Planet), was published the next year. In 2003 Kyō no dekigoto was adapted by Isao Yukisada into a film of the same name.[3]

In 2006 Shibasaki won a MEXT Award for New Artists for Sono machi no ima wa (Today, in that City), which was then nominated in 2007 for the Akutagawa Prize, but did not win.[4] In 2010 she won the Noma Literary New Face Prize for Nete mo samete mo, a first-person story about a woman who falls in love, loses her boyfriend, then meets a man who looks identical to her disappeared boyfriend but acts completely differently.[5][6] In 2014, after having her work nominated three more times for the Akutagawa Prize, Shibasaki finally won the 151st Akutagawa Prize for her novel Haru no niwa (Spring Garden).[7]

In 2016 the Japan Foundation sponsored her residency in the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa.[8] The following year, an English translation of her Akutagawa Prize-winning novel Haru no niwa was published by Pushkin Press under the title Spring Garden.[9] In 2018 Ryūsuke Hamaguchi's film adaptation of Nete mo samete mo, titled Asako I & II, entered the competition at the Cannes Film Festival.[10]

Recognition[edit]

Film adaptations[edit]

  • A Day on the Planet (きょうのできごと, Kyō no dekigoto), 2003[3]
  • Asako I & II, 2018[10]

Bibliography[edit]

Books in Japanese[edit]

Selected Work in English[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Japan/America: Writers' Dialogue". Asia Society. Retrieved June 17, 2018. 
  2. ^ "Tomoka Shibasaki". Books from Japan. Retrieved June 17, 2018. 
  3. ^ a b "きょうのできごと a day on the planet". Cinema Today. Retrieved August 27, 2018. 
  4. ^ a b "芸術選奨歴代受賞者一覧(昭和25年度~)" (PDF). Agency for Cultural Affairs, Government of Japan (in Japanese). Retrieved June 21, 2018. 
  5. ^ "野間三賞の受賞作品がそれぞれ発表、野間文芸新人賞に柴崎友香と円城塔". Cinra.net (in Japanese). November 5, 2010. Retrieved August 27, 2018. 
  6. ^ Schilling, Mark (September 5, 2018). "Ryusuke Hamaguchi's Cannes submission tackles the difficulties of relationships". The Japan Times. Retrieved September 7, 2018. 
  7. ^ a b "Akutagawa, Naoki literary awards go to Shibasaki, Kurokawa". The Japan Times. July 17, 2014. Retrieved July 18, 2014. 
  8. ^ "SHIBASAKI Tomoka". International Writing Program. Retrieved June 17, 2018. 
  9. ^ Moloney, Iain (June 10, 2017). "'Spring Garden': A masterful look at loneliness and malaise in Tokyo". The Japan Times. Retrieved June 18, 2018. 
  10. ^ a b Dalton, Stephen (May 14, 2018). "'Asako I & II' ('Netemo sametemo'): Film Review Cannes 2018". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved June 17, 2018. 
  11. ^ "野間文芸新人賞". Kodansha (in Japanese). Retrieved June 21, 2018. 

External links[edit]