Tomorrow Never Comes

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Tomorrow Never Comes
Tomorrow-never-comes-movie-poster-1978.jpg
Theatrical release poster`
Directed by Peter Collinson
Written by Sydney Banks
David Pursall
Jack Seddon
Starring Oliver Reed
Music by Roy Budd
Cinematography François Protat
Edited by John Shirley
Production
company
Classic
Montreal Trust
Neffbourne
Distributed by J. Arthur Rank Film Distributors (UK)
Cinépix Film Properties (CFP)
Release date
  • 2 March 1978 (1978-03-02)
Running time
109 minutes
Country Canada
United Kingdom
Language English
Budget CAD 2,341,000

Tomorrow Never Comes is a 1978 British-Canadian crime film directed by Peter Collinson and starring Oliver Reed and Susan George.[1]

Plot[edit]

Coming back from an extended business trip, Frank (Stephen McHattie) discovers that his girlfriend Janie (Susan George) is now working at a new resort hotel where the owner has given her a permanent place to stay, as well as other gifts, in exchange for her affections. In the course of fighting over this development, tensions between Frank and Janie escalate out of control until he is holding her hostage in a standoff with the police. As the negotiators (Oliver Reed, Paul Koslo) try to talk Frank into giving himself up, the desperate man feels himself being pushed further and further into a corner.[2]

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

The movie was a "tax shelter co-production" between the UK and Canada. The picture was filmed in the province of Québec. The picture is considered to be a Canadian exploitation film - a genre which is known as Canuxploitation.[3]

Awards[edit]

The film was entered into the 11th Moscow International Film Festival.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tomorrow Never Comes (1977) - Peter Collinson - Synopsis, Characteristics, Moods, Themes and Related - AllMovie". AllMovie. Retrieved 22 November 2017. 
  2. ^ "Tomorrow Never Comes". 2 March 1978. Retrieved 22 November 2017 – via www.imdb.com. 
  3. ^ "Tomorrow Never Comes (1978)". Retrieved 22 November 2017 – via www.imdb.com. 
  4. ^ "11th Moscow International Film Festival (1979)". MIFF. Archived from the original on 3 April 2014. Retrieved 14 January 2013. 

External links[edit]