Tongoa

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Tongoa
Geography
LocationPacific Ocean
Coordinates16°54′S 168°33′E / 16.900°S 168.550°E / -16.900; 168.550Coordinates: 16°54′S 168°33′E / 16.900°S 168.550°E / -16.900; 168.550
ArchipelagoVanuatu, Shepherd Islands
Area42[1] km2 (16 sq mi)
Highest elevation191 m (627 ft)
Administration
ProvinceShefa Province
Demographics
Population2243 (2015)

Tongoa Island (also known as Kueae) is an inhabited island in Shefa Province of Vanuatu in the Pacific Ocean.[2]

Geography[edit]

Tongoa is the largest island of Shepherd Islands archipelago. The island is heavily vegetated and shows geothermal activity. Tongoa is of recent volcanic origin but currently has no currently active volcano.[3] There are numerous volcanic old cones on the island and some black sand beaches. The interior part of the island is densely rainforested. The island is named after the Tongoa plant which grows in the area. Megapode birds nest on the island.[4] The only mammals present on the island are the bats Pteropus anetianus and Tonga leather (Pteropus tonganus).

The estimated terrain elevation above the sea level is some 191 metres.[5] There is an airport on the island—Tongoa Airport (TGH).[6]

Population[edit]

As of 2015, the official local population was 2243 people in 454 households.[7] There are 14 villages on the island. Some natives speak Makura language (Na Makura) and North Efate language (Na Kanamanga).[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Vanuatu". Haos Blong Volkeno. Retrieved 8 August 2018.
  2. ^ UNEP Islands Directory
  3. ^ "Tongoa - Laika". Birdlife International. Retrieved 10 August 2018.
  4. ^ "Shepherd group of islands". Vanuatu Islands Travel Info. Retrieved 9 August 2018.
  5. ^ "Tongoa Island". Mapcarta. Retrieved 8 August 2018.
  6. ^ "Tongoa Airport (TGH)". World Airport Codes. Retrieved 8 August 2018.
  7. ^ "2015 Vanuatu National Population and Households Projections by Province and Islands" (PDF). Vanuatu National Statistics Office. Retrieved 8 August 2018.
  8. ^ Coiffier, Christian. Traditional Architecture in Vanuatu. p. 129. ISBN 9789820200470. Retrieved 10 August 2018.