Toni Polster

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Toni Polster
Polster Toni-7361-fmp (18560369719).jpg
Polster in 2015
Personal information
Full name Anton Polster
Date of birth (1964-03-10) 10 March 1964 (age 54)
Place of birth Vienna, Austria
Height 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in)
Playing position Striker
Youth career
1973–1981 Austria Wien
1982 1. Simmeringer SC
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1982–1987 Austria Wien 147 (119)
1987–1988 Torino 27 (9)
1988–1991 Sevilla 102 (55)
1991–1992 Logroñés 38 (14)
1992–1993 Rayo Vallecano 31 (14)
1993–1998 1. FC Köln 151 (79)
1998–1999 Borussia Mönchengladbach 38 (15)
1999–2000 Austria Salzburg 12 (2)
Total 546 (307)
National team
1982–2000 Austria 95 (44)
Teams managed
2010 LASK Linz (reserve-team)
2011–2013 Wiener Viktoria
2013 Admira Wacker
2014– Wiener Viktoria
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Anton "Toni" Polster (born 10 March 1964) is a retired Austrian footballer and current coach. He is the all-time leading goalscorer for Austria and the singer of the Austrian band Achtung Liebe.

Polster's top flight coaching debut at Admira Wacker lasted just three league games before he was sacked 10 August 2013.[1]

Club career[edit]

Polster came through the Austria Wien youth system to make his professional league debut in August 1982, at 18 years of age. He scored his first Bundesliga goal three weeks later and went on to win three league titles and a domestic cup before moving abroad to play a season in Serie A with Torino. He then spent the five following years at Spanish teams Sevilla, Logroñés and Rayo Vallecano, ending up with these teams in mid-table as well except for one year, 1989–90, in which Sevilla FC ended in sixth place and played UEFA Cup the following year. In 1990, he finished runner-up in the Spanish goalscoring chart.[2] In 1993, he moved to Germany to spend five years at Köln, again ending up in mid-table every season except for the last one in which he experienced relegation. That made him join Borussia Mönchengladbach next year but they got also relegated at the end of the season and Polster returned to Austria to play a final season at Austria Salzburg.[3]

He was known to fans as "Toni Doppelpack" – "Toni Twinpack", because of his reputation for scoring two goals in many matches.[4][5]

Polster was chosen in Austria's Team of the Century in 2001 and as Austrian Sportsman of the Year 1997.

International career[edit]

In 1983, Polster was selected for the Austria U20's to play at the 1983 FIFA World Youth Championship.[6]

He had already made his senior debut for Austria in November 1982 against Turkey, immediately scoring his first goal, and was a participant at the 1990 World Cup and 1998 World Cup.[7] He earned 95 caps, scoring a record 44 goals.[8] He overtook the previous goalscoring record, set by Hans Krankl, in November 1996, scoring his 35th goal against Latvia.[8][9]

His final (and record-breaking 94th) international was thought to be a 1998 FIFA World Cup match against Italy in June, but he was given an official farewell match in September 2000 against Iran,[10] in which he was substituted in the 21st minute by Christian Mayrleb.[11] His appearances record was surpassed by Andreas Herzog in May 2002.[12]

International goals[edit]

Scores and results list Austria's goal tally first.
# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 17 November 1982 Gerhard Hanappi Stadium, Vienna  Turkey 1–0 4–0 Euro 1984 qualifier
2. 7 May 1985 Liebenau Stadium, Graz  Cyprus 2–0 4–0 1986 World Cup qualifier
3. 26 March 1986 Stadio Friuli, Udine  Italy 1–0 1–2 Friendly
4. 27 August 1986 Tivoli, Innsbruck   Switzerland 1–0 1–1
5. 15 October 1986 Liebenau Stadium, Graz  Albania 2–0 3–0 Euro 1988 qualifier
6. 29 October 1986 Praterstadion, Vienna  West Germany 1–0 4–1 Friendly
7. 2–1
8. 1 April 1987  Spain 2–2 2–3 Euro 1988 qualifier
9. 29 April 1987 Qemal Stafa Stadium, Tirana  Albania 1–0 1–0
10. 2 November 1988 Praterstadion, Vienna  Turkey 1–0 3–2 1990 World Cup qualifier
11. 20 May 1989 Zentralstadion, Leipzig  East Germany 1–0 1–1
12. 15 November 1989 Praterstadion, Vienna 1–0 3–0
13. 2–0
14. 3–0
15. 28 March 1990 Estadio La Rosaleda, Málaga  Spain 2–2 3–2 Friendly
16. 25 March 1992 Népstadion, Budapest  Hungary 1–0 1–2
17. 14 April 1992 Praterstadion, Vienna  Lithuania 3–0 4–0
18. 27 May 1992 De Baandert, Sittard-Geleen  Netherlands 1–2 2–3
19. 2 September 1992 Linzer Stadion, Linz  Portugal 1–0 1–1
20. 28 October 1992 Praterstadion, Vienna  Israel 3–0 5–2 1994 World Cup qualifier
21. 14 April 1993 Ernst-Happel-Stadion, Vienna  Bulgaria 3–1 3–1
22. 2 June 1994  Germany 1–4 1–5 Friendly
23. 7 September 1994 Sportpark, Eschen  Liechtenstein 1–0 4–0 Euro 1996 qualifier
24. 3–0
25. 4–0
26. 12 October 1994 Ernst-Happel-Stadion, Vienna  Northern Ireland 1–1 1–2
27. 29 March 1995 Stadion Lehen, Salzburg  Latvia 4–0 5–0
28. 5–0
29. 26 April 1995  Liechtenstein 2–0 7–0
30. 4–0
31. 11 June 1995 Lansdowne Road, Dublin  Republic of Ireland 1–1 3–1
32. 3–1
33. 16 August 1995 Daugava Stadium, Riga  Latvia 1–2 2–3
34. 24 April 1996 Népstadion, Budapest  Hungary 1–0 2–0 Friendly
35. 9 November 1996 Ernst-Happel-Stadion, Vienna  Latvia 1–0 2–1 1998 World Cup qualifier
36. 8 June 1997 Daugava Stadium, Riga 2–0 3–1
37. 20 August 1997 Kadrioru Stadium, Tallinn  Estonia 1–0 3–0
38. 2–0
39. 3–0
40. 11 October 1997 Ernst-Happel-Stadion, Vienna  Belarus 1–0 4–0
41. 3–0
42. 2 June 1998  Liechtenstein 1–0 6–0 Friendly
43. 6–0
44. 11 June 1998 Stadium Municipal, Toulouse  Cameroon 1–1 1–1 1998 World Cup

Coaching career[edit]

Polster began his coaching career in January 2010 as the reserve-team coach at LASK Linz. In June 2011, he became the head coach of SC Wiener Viktoria in the Austrian 2. Landesliga, the fifth-tier in Austrian football. During his first season at Wiener Viktoria, the team promoted to the fourth-tier and consequently a year after to the third division, the so-called Austrian Regional League. On 17 June 2013, he accepted his first coaching role in the Austrian Bundesliga, taking over as the head coach of the top-flight side Admira Wacker Mödling.[13] After starting the season with three straight defeats, including a 7–1 defeat to newly promoted Scholz Grödig, Polster was fired by Admira on 9 August 2013.[14] Polster returned to SC Wiener Viktoria on 13 January 2014.[15]

Career record[edit]

As of 15 May 2014
Team From To Record
G W D L GF GA GD Win % Ref.
LASK Linz (A)1 4 January 2010[16] 29 November 2010[16] 16 8 1 7 29 26 +3 050.00 [17]
SC Wiener Viktoria2 1 July 2011[18] 17 June 2013[13] 33 22 6 5 88 32 +56 066.67 [19]
Admira Wacker Mödling 17 June 2013[13] 9 August 2013[14] 4 1 0 3 4 11 −7 025.00 [20]
SC Wiener Viktoria 13 January 2014[15] Present 12 2 0 10 16 34 −18 016.67 [21]
Total 65 33 7 25 137 103 +34 050.77
  • 1.^ Only 2010–11 season matches are included. Matches before 4 January 2010 – 6 August 2010 not included.
  • 2.^ Only 2012–13 season matches are included. Matches from the 2011–12 season not included.

Honours[edit]

Club[edit]

Austria Wien

Individual[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Football: Polster sacked by struggling Admira". globalpost.com. 10 August 2013. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Tejedor Carnicero, José Vicente (28 September 2000). "Spain, Final Tables 1989-1999". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 December 2012. 
  3. ^ Matthias Arnhold (31 July 2014). "Anton Polster - Matches and Goals in Bundesliga". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 3 September 2014. 
  4. ^ Metzger, Josef (1998). Doppelpack : Fußball mit Herz und Schmäh. Wien: Pichler. ISBN 9783854311461. 
  5. ^ Polster, Toni. "Toni "Doppelpack" Polster". Retrieved 17 May 2014. 
  6. ^ "1983 Austria U20 squad". FIFA.com. Retrieved 28 December 2012. 
  7. ^ Toni PolsterFIFA competition record
  8. ^ a b Mamrud, Roberto Mamrud (29 January 2009). "Anton "Toni" Polster - Goals in International Matches". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 28 December 2012. 
  9. ^ Daley, Kieran (10 November 1996). "French record falls to Pedersen". The Independent. Retrieved 14 September 2014. 
  10. ^ "5:1 – Erfolg im Freundschaftsspiel gegen den Iran: Polster sagt laut "Servus"". Rheinische Post (in German). 2 September 2000. Retrieved 14 September 2014. 
  11. ^ "Länderspiele von März 2000" (PDF). Austrian Football Association (in German). Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 June 2011. Retrieved 14 September 2014. 
  12. ^ "Österreich in BayArena chancenlos". Der Standard (in German). 20 May 2002. Retrieved 14 September 2014. 
  13. ^ a b c "Admira give Polster first shot at the top flight". UEFA.com. 18 June 2013. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  14. ^ a b "Admira tritt gegen Toni Polster nach". Österreich (in German). 11 August 2013. Retrieved 13 January 2014. 
  15. ^ a b "Fix! Polster kehrt zu Wiener Viktoria zurück" (in German). 13 January 2014. Retrieved 13 January 2014. 
  16. ^ a b "LASK Linz (A) » Trainerhistorie". Worldfootball. Archived from the original on 14 January 2014. Retrieved 13 January 2014. 
  17. ^ "LASK Linz (A) » Dates & results 2010/2011". Worldfootball. Archived from the original on 14 January 2014. Retrieved 13 January 2014. 
  18. ^ "SC Wiener Viktoria » Trainerhistorie". Worldfootball. Retrieved 13 January 2014. 
  19. ^ "SC Wiener Viktoria » Dates & results 2012/2013". Worldfootball. Retrieved 13 January 2014. 
  20. ^ "FC Admira Wacker" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 13 January 2014. 
  21. ^ "SC Wiener Viktoria » Dates & results 2013/2014". Worldfootball. Retrieved 13 January 2014. 
  22. ^ "Österreichs Torschützenkönige". www.oberliga-a.at. Archived from the original on 15 September 2007. Retrieved 14 August 2008. 

External links[edit]

Awards
Preceded by
Andreas Goldberger
Austrian Sportsman of the Year
1997
Succeeded by
Hermann Maier