Family Coalition Party of Ontario candidates, 2003 Ontario provincial election

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The Family Coalition Party of Ontario is a socially conservative party in Ontario, Canada. The party ran fifty-one candidates in the 2003 Ontario provincial election, none of whom were elected. Information about these candidates may be found on this page.

This page also includes information about FCP candidates in subsequent by-elections.

Contents

Candidates[edit]

Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Aldershot: Michael Trolly[edit]

Born in Oshawa, Ontario on February 22, 1984. A parishioner of the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada. Was home-schooled. A singer-pianist in the field of Christian music. Issued a CD entitled From The Middle of Your Wild Dream in 2002; his second CD, "Even As We Are", was released in December, 2006. As a pre-teen, served as founder and president of Youth For Life International, an anti-abortion organization (no longer active). Also involved in youth rights and other political associations. Attended Redeemer University College in Ancaster, Ontario, Dominican University College in Ottawa, Ontario, and Canadian Mennonite University in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Supported allowing non-Christian students into Redeemer programs. As of 2005, maintains a website for St. Barnabas Apostle and Martyr Traditional Anglican Church. Received 434 votes (0.9%), finishing fifth in a field of six candidates. The winner was Ted McMeekin of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Barrie—Simcoe—Bradford: Roberto Sales[edit]

Creative director in a Toronto marketing firm. Has lived in Barrie since 1993, works in the local Out-of-the-Cold program. A member of a work team aiding orphans in Kenya. Received 411 votes (0.72%), finishing last in a field of five candidates. The winner was Joseph Tascona of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

Brampton West—Mississauga: Paul Micelli[edit]

Micelli lives in Mississauga, Ontario and works in Iko Industries, a recycling organization. Has been a member of the FCP since 1999, and as of 2005 serves as executive vice-president and regional director for the "905" area around Toronto. He received 1122 votes (1.79%) in the 1999 election, finishing fourth in a field of six candidates. The winner was Vic Dhillon of the Ontario Liberal Party.

He later ran against Progressive Conservative leader John Tory in a March 17, 2005 by-election in Dufferin—Peel—Wellington—Grey. During this campaign, he claimed that Tory was so far to the left on social issues as to be indistinguishable from the Liberals. He also opposed the Liberal government's "Greenbelt" legislation. He received 488 votes (1.7%), finishing fifth out of eight candidates. Micelli claimed he was surprised at the strength of Tory's victory in this by-election.

Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound: Linda Freiburger[edit]

Born February 6, 1948 in Kitchener, Ontario. Now lives in Walkerton, Ontario. Active in the local Farm Safety Association and Catholic Women's League. Longtime FCP activist, and was chosen vice-president of the party in 1999. First ran for the FCP in the 1990 provincial election, and received a total of 3,639 votes (11.9%) in Bruce. Still finished fourth in a field of four candidates; the winner was Murray Elston of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Ran for the FCP again in the 1999 provincial election, and received 1,494 votes in Huron—Bruce, again finishing fourth in a field of four candidates. The winner was Helen Johns of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario. Received 1,086 votes (2.42%) in 2003; the winner was Bill Murdoch of the Progressive Conservatives.

Burlington: Vic Corvaro[edit]

Was eighteen years old at the time of the election. A graduate of Lord Elgin High School. Father is Emidio Corvaro, a former FCP candidate. Received 523 votes (1.12%), finishing fifth in a field of five candidates. The winner was Cam Jackson of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

Cambridge: Al Smith[edit]

Attaining local notoriety in 1999, after an unfavourable newspaper report concerning his views on same-sex couples. Has campaigned for the FCP in Cambridge three times. Received 1,690 votes in the 1995 election, 1,494 in the 1999 election, and 1,001 votes in 2003, finishing fourth in a field of five candidates. The winner on all three occasions was Gerry Martiniuk of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

Don Valley East: Ryan Kidd[edit]

Born in British Columbia in 1977. Moved to Ontario in 1985 and was raised in a rural area around Georgian Bay. Works in the computer software industry in Toronto, and has assisted recent immigrants with English-language skills. Campaign website highlights Kidd's opposition to abortion. Has also written that " [t]he public square and especially children must be protected from the advance of a radical homosexual agenda seeking public approval for same-gender "sex"."[1] Has criticized public schools for promoting secular humanism, and "choosing to ignore God".[2] Also supports the privatization of Ontario Hydro and the deregulation of the automobile insurance industry. Regional FCP director for Toronto East. Conducts home Bible study sessions. First ran in Don Valley East in the 1999 provincial election, finishing fifth in a field of ten candidates with 153 votes. He finished over 20,000 votes behind the winner, David Caplan of the Ontario Liberal Party. Received 460 votes in 2003, finishing fifth out of six candidates. Caplan again won the riding.

Kidd has also campaigned federally for the Christian Heritage Party on two occasions. He received 212 votes in Don Valley East in the federal election of 2000, and 351 in the 2004. On the first occasion, he appeared on the ballot as an independent because the CHP had been de-registered. The winner in 2000 was David Collenette, and Yasmin Ratansi won the seat in 2004; both are Liberals.

Dufferin—Peel—Wellington—Grey: Dave Davies[edit]

A farmer. Campaigned in Dufferin—Peel—Wellington—Grey for the Reform Party of Canada in the 1997 federal election, and lost to Liberal Murray Calder by over 6,000 votes. Received 14,760 votes for a second-place finish. Ran for the FCP against Progressive Conservative leader Ernie Eves in a May 2, 2002 by-election, and finished fifth out of six candidates with 1,205 votes (3.12%). Lost to Eves again in 2003, receiving 1,202 votes and finishing last in a field of five candidates. According to one witness, Davies made the following comment during the 2003 campaign while justifying his opposition to same-sex marriage: "love can come and go, but your responsibilities in the marriage have to remain. Gays don't see it that way."[3] Could not run against John Tory in a 2005 by-election because business engagements kept him out of the country.

Erie—Lincoln: Steve Elgersma[edit]

Retired farmer and holticulturalist. Worked for Rosaflora Greenhouse Ltd. for nineteen years. Retired in 2000. A Sunday School teacher, was president of the Sunday School Teachers Federation of Ontario for three years. Director and president of the Haldimand Association for the Developmentally Challenged. Also director of the Dunnville and District Right to Life committee. Received 666 votes, finishing last in a field of five candidates. The winner was Tim Hudak of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario. Later campaigned federally for the Christian Heritage Party, of which he is a life member.

Other candidacies:

Etobicoke—Lakeshore: Ted Kupiec[edit]

A Roman Catholic, and a member of the Cursillo movement. Received 480 votes (1.08%), finishing fifth in a field of six candidates. The winner was Laurel Broten of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Etobicoke North: Teresa Ceolin[edit]

Graduate of York University, with a Bachelor of Arts degree in History. Works part-time from her home. Received 1,275 votes, finishing fifth in a field of six candidates. The winner was Shafiq Qaadri of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Guelph—Wellington: Alan John McDonald[edit]

Born in Ajax, Ontario. Former locomotive engineer and operations officer with the Canadian National Railway. Was a Derrick Boom operator with Dexler Construction Inc. at the time of the election. Was a councillor in Guelph-Eramosa Township in 1999-2000, and served as a trustee on the Wellington Catholic District School Board for three years. Received 914 votes, finishing last in a field of five candidates. The winner was Liz Sandals of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Haldimand—Norfolk—Brant: Barra L. Gots[edit]

Attended Ontario Agricultural College and the University of Guelph. Has a Bachelor of Science degree in Agriculture. A biologist. Has worked in the Distance Education department of Nova Southeastern University since 1993. Previously a research associate in the Department of Zoology at Guelph. Also served as director of Faun Aquatics Canada Ltd. from 1979 to 1996. Member of the Spiritan Catholic Charismatic Prayer Group and the Cursillo movement. First ran for the FCP in the 1999 provincial election, and finished fourth out of six candidates with 584 votes. Received 548 in 2003, finishing fifth out of five candidates. The winner on both occasions was Toby Barrett of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario. Also ran for the Christian Heritage Party in Brant in the 2004 federal election, and finished fifth out of six candidates with 570 votes. The winner was Lloyd St. Amand of the Liberal Party of Canada. Husband John Gots has also campaigned for both the FCP and CHP.

Haliburton—Victoria—Brock: Paul Gordon[edit]

Lives in Cannington, Ontario. Roman Catholic, strongly opposed to same-sex marriage and abortion. No political experience before 2003, ran because the FCP was unable to find a candidate in the riding. Supported a boycott of Canadian Tire, because of its plan to permit advertising for the television show "My Fabulous Gay Wedding". Has referred to Stephen Harper as an "opportunistic phoney" on social issues, and has expressed similar views about Stockwell Day and Tom Wappel. Received 663 votes, finishing fifth in a field of six candidates. The winner was Laurie Scott of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

Halton: Giuseppe Gori[edit]

Party leader. See his biography page for further details. Received 1,123 votes, finishing last in a field of five candidates.

Hamilton East: Michael Izzotti[edit]

A pharmacist in Hamilton, Ontario. Has degrees in Biochemistry and Physiology from the University of Toronto, a Bachler's Degree in Pharmacy from the University of British Columbia, and a residency in Hospital pharmacy at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. Has been a member of the FCP since the late 1980s. A member of Hamilton Right To Life, and active in the Knights of Columbus. A leader of Pharmacists for Life International/Canada, supporting the rights of pharmacists not to dispense or refer products to services to which they have ethical objections—particularly those involving assisted suicides, euthanasia or abortion. Opposed the approval of Preven in 1999. Received 304 votes, finishing last in a field of seven candidates. The winner was Dominic Agostino of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Hamilton Mountain: Eleanor Johnson[edit]

Previously worked in the field of promotional advertising. Was 81 years old at the time of the election. Supports "property rights" as well as conservative causes on social issues. Received 748 votes, finishing fourth in a field of five candidates. The winner was Marie Bountrogianni of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Hamilton West: Lynne Scime[edit]

Scime received 750 votes, finishing fourth against Liberal candidate Judy Marsales. See her biography page for more information.

Hastings—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington: John-Henry Westen[edit]

The editor of LifeSite News, an internet forum sponsored by The Interim and aligned with the FCP. Has a Master of Arts degree, and lives near Ottawa, Ontario. Has referred to Canada as a "haven for sexual predators of children". Also opposed the spread of contraception and population control in the third world as a form of cultural imperialism, and referred to Daniel arap Moi's support for condoms in Kenya as an abdication of moral responsibility.[4] Has also opposed American loans to the International Monetary Fund in the absence of pro-life guarantees. Supports a total ban on in-vitro fertilization. Received 673 votes, finishing last in a field of five candidates. The winner was Leona Dombrowsky of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Previous candidacies:

Huron—Bruce: Dave Joslin[edit]

A welder-fitter, 49 years old in 2003. Lives in Grey Township, and is a member of the Bethel Free Reformed Church in Mitchell, Ontario. He opposes judicial activism, abortion, embryonic research and hate-crimes legislation. The 2003 race was his first provincial campaign, though he has also campaigned federally for the Christian Heritage Party. Received 902 votes, finishing fifth in a field of six candidates. The winner was Carol Mitchell of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Other candidacies:

Kingston and the Islands: Chris Beneteau[edit]

Has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Child and Youth Care from Ryerson Polytechnic College in Toronto, and a degree from the Child and Youth Worker Program of St. Lawrence College in Kingston, Ontario. Works with children with socio-emotional difficulties. Writes for www.catholic-legate.com. Also involved with Albacore International, a boating organization. Has accused some writers in the Kingston Whig-Standard of being "apologists for homosexuals" and has called for an end to "homophilia". Now lives in Ottawa, Ontario. First ran in Kingston and the Islands in the 1999 provincial election, and received 546 votes for a fifth-place finish out of six candidates. In 2003, received 735 votes for a fifth-place finish out of five candidates. The winner on both occasions was John Gerretsen of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Kitchener—Waterloo: Lou Reitzel[edit]

Past president of the FCP, and a member of its provincial executive. Has been a member of the FCP since 1992. Also president of Reitzel Heating and Air Conditioning in Waterloo, Ontario. Lives in neighbouring Kitchener. Parish Treasurer of the local Holy Name Society. Received 949 votes, finishing fifth in a field of seven candidates. The winner was Elizabeth Witmer of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

Previous candidacies:

Lanark—Carleton: Jim Gardiner[edit]

Lives in Carleton Place. Former union leader with Retail and Printing trade unions. Has an educational assistant diploma. Was on the Local Disaster Relief Committee of the 1998 Ice Storm. Received 1,275 votes, finishing fifth in a field of five candidates. The winner was Norman Sterling of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

Leeds—Grenville: Melody Trolly[edit]

Mother of Michael Trolly, who was also an FCP candidate in 2003. Formerly a co-owner of "The Anchor Christian Books, Music and Gifts" in Kemptville, Ontario. Opposed any increase in the minimum wage. Received 649 votes, finishing last in a field of five candidates. The winner was Bob Runciman of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

London North Centre: Craig Smith[edit]

Graduated from the University of Waterloo with a Master's Degree in Environmental Studies in 1999, and received a Diploma in Computer Programming from CDI College in 2001. 29 years old at the time of the election. Computer programmer. Operates www.conservativelife.com/blog. Seems to support the Conservative Party of Canada at the federal level, in that he has sent e-mails to several Liberal MPs who oppose same-sex marriage, asking them to join the Conservative Party. Received 432 votes, finishing fifth in a field of six candidates. The winner was Deb Matthews of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Markham: Patrick Redmond[edit]

Works at IBM's Canadian headquarters in Markham. Joined the FCP in 1992, and was elected FCP vice-president in 1999. Formerly a member of the Reform Party of Canada at the federal level. Received 697 votes, finishing last in a field of five candidates. The winner was Tony Wong of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Previous candidacies:

Mississauga Centre: John R. Lyall[edit]

No information. Received 588 votes, finishing last in a field of five candidates. The winner was Harinder Jeet Singh Takhar of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Mississauga East: Gary Nail[edit]

An employee at DailmerChrysler Canada Inc in Brampton, Ontario. Signed a petition against Trans fats in 2005.[5] Received 358 votes, finishing fifth in a field of six candidates. The winner was Peter Fonseca of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Mississauga South: Alfred Zawadzki[edit]

A retired teacher in Mississauga, Ontario, has worked at the elementary and secondary levels. Received 555 votes, finishing last in a field of five candidates. The winner was Tim Peterson of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Mississauga West: Charles Montano[edit]

No information. Received 989 votes, finishing last in a field of five candidates. The winner was Bob Delaney of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Oakville: Theresa Tritt[edit]

No information. Received 751 votes, finishing last in a field of four candidates. The winner was Kevin Flynn of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Oshawa: Dave Chilvers[edit]

Formerly the owner of durhammall.com, a charity site which was turned into a pornography website after Chilvers sold it (Chilvers had no prior knowledge of this change). A member of The Shared Parenting Network. Received 383 votes, finishing last in a field of six candidates. The winner was Jerry Ouellette of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

Ottawa South: John Pacheco[edit]

Pacheco received 562 votes, finishing last in a field of five candidates. See his biography page for more information.

Oxford: Andre de Decker[edit]

Born in Belgium. Moved with his family to the area of Tillsonburg, Ontario in 1948, and remains there today. Received a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics from the University of Waterloo in 1968, and returned to Tillsonburg to teach high school. Was a guidance counsellor as well as a classroom teacher. Retired in 1998. A member of Oxford Right to Life, and an active member of St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church in Tillsonburg. Received 689 votes, finishing fifth in a field of seven candidates. The winner was Ernie Hardeman of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

Previous candidacies:

Parkdale—High Park: Stan Grzywna[edit]

An educational assistant at the Toronto Catholic District School Board. Holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from York University. Involved in the Knights of Columbus and the Providence Centre. First ran for the FCP in the 1999 provincial election, and received 289 votes, finishing sixth out of eight candidates. Received 591 votes in 2003, finishing fifth out of eight. The winner on both occasions was Gerard Kennedy of the Ontario Liberal Party.

He ran again in 2006, when the seat was vacated, and lost.

Parry Sound—Muskoka: Charlene Phinney[edit]

No information. Received 484 votes, finishing last in a field of five candidates. The winner was Norm Miller of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

Perth—Middlesex: Pat Bannon[edit]

A resident of Stratford, Ontario for fifty years at the time of the election. Educated in Ontario's Catholic school system. Worked as a machine setter at (note: this is not a joke) F.A.G. Bearings Ltd. for thirty years. Served as a social member of the Army Navy Air Force Veterans Association, Unit 261 for 27 years. A member of Stratford Right-to-Life and the Campaign Life coalition since 1981. Previously a member of Liberals For Life, and campaigned for a pro-life Liberal candidate in the 1988 federal election. Was a delegate at the Liberal Party national convention in 1990, which elected Jean Chrétien as party leader. Left the Liberal Party for the FCP after this time. Managed FCP candidate Gordon Maloney's election run in the 1990 provincial election. First ran for the FCP in the 1999 provincial election, and received 1,369 votes, finishing fourth out of five candidates. Received 857 votes in 2003, finishing fifth out of six candidates. The winner on the first occasion was Bert Johnson of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario; the winner on the second occasion was John Wilkinson of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Peterborough: Max Murray[edit]

Max Murray is a former New Democrat.[1] During the election, he supported an increase to the minimum wage and financial assistance for low-income families, while also expressing socially conservative views.[2] He ran for the Peterborough city council in the 2003 municipal election, which overlapped with the provincial election.

Electoral record
Election Division Party Votes  % Place Winner
2003 provincial Peterborough Family Coalition 414 0.75 5/6 Jeff Leal, Liberal
2003 municipal Council, Ward Three n/a 316 4.49 7/11 Bernard Cahill and Bill Juby

Sault Ste. Marie: Allan Walker[edit]

55 years old at the time of the election. A conservative Catholic. Had lived in Sault Ste. Marie for 18 years. Graduated from Northern College in Kirkland Lake as an Electronic Technologist in 1969. Formerly worked for Bell Canada, and was president of a provincial organization called Employment Excellence (which opposed employment equity provisions introduced by the government of Bob Rae). Served on the local executives of the Reform Party (which he joined in 1987) and Canadian Alliance at the federal level. In 2004, criticized Conservative leader Stephen Harper for hiring social moderate Hugh Segal as an advisor and openly mused about joining the Christian Heritage Party.[6] Was the only FCP candidate to run in northern Ontario (i.e. north of Parry Sound). Received 606 votes, finishing fourth out of five candidates. The winner was David Orazietti of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Scarborough—Agincourt: Tony Ieraci[edit]

No information. Ran in Broadview—Greenwood in the 1999 provincial election, and received 320 votes for a last-place finish in a field of six candidates. The winner was Marilyn Churley of the New Democratic Party. In 2003, received 550 votes and finished last in a field of five candidates. The winner was Gerald Phillips of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Scarborough Centre: Joseph Internicola[edit]

Works in the paint and decorating field. Opposes a social trend toward longer working hours (i.e. Sundays), and supports Sunday restoring as a day of rest. Is against abortion, euthanasia and gender neutral marriage. Received 495 votes, finishing sixth in a field of seven candidates. The winner was Brad Duguid of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Scarborough—Rouge River: Mitchell Persaud[edit]

Has a Master's Degree in Divinity from Greenville Presbyterian Seminary (1997). Became pastor of New Horizon Church in Scarborough in 1996. Received 536 votes, finishing last in a field of five candidates. The winner was Alvin Curling of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Scarborough Southwest: Ray Scott[edit]

33 years old at the time of the election. A public school teacher, and a member of the Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario. Has sought to have the ETFO consider human rights issues when making investments with its pension fund. Lists William Wilberforce as his personal hero.[7] President of the local FCP association. Opposed mandatory disclosure provisions for adoptees, on the grounds that these could lead pregnant mothers to seek abortions rather than give up their children for adoption. Interestingly, has described spanking children as "an archaic method of discipline", and claims that pro-lifers should avoid corporal punishment of this sort.[8] First ran for the FCP in a 2001 by-election in Beaches—East York, and finished fifth out of eight candidates with 206 votes. The winner was Michael Prue of the New Democratic Party. Received 586 votes in 2003, finishing last in a field of five candidates. The winner was Lorenzo Berardinetti of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Simcoe—Grey: Steven J. Taylor[edit]

Resides near Markdale, Ontario. Formerly worked in the fields of life insurance and telecommunications. Has managed a swim school and recreation centre since 1991. [www.euniceswimschool.com] In 2003, he further developed his company to build and service swimming pools, Ponds, and Hot Tubs.[www.Tayfam.ca] Has served on the executive of the Toronto Christian Home Schoolers Association since 1995. Received 801 votes, finishing fifth out of six candidates. The winner was Jim Wilson of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario. Also ran for the Christian Heritage Party in the 2004 federal election in the riding of Grey—Bruce—Owen Sound, and received 982 votes for a fifth place finish. The winner was Larry Miller of the Conservative Party of Canada.

Simcoe North: Blaine Matthew Scott[edit]

41 years old at the time of the election. A librarian and music teacher in the Catholic School System. Joined the FCP in 2000, after being introduced to the party by a federal candidate of the Canadian Alliance. A member of Fairvote Canada, an electoral-reform organization. Received 453 votes, finishing fifth in a field of six candidates. The winner was Garfield Dunlop of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

St. Catharines: Linda Klassen[edit]

Klassen received 714, finishing fifth against Liberal incumbent Jim Bradley. Click here for more information.

Toronto—Danforth: Masood Atchekzai[edit]

Came to Canada from Afghanistan in the early 1990s. Studied Business Administration at Seneca College. Formerly a store manager, now owns an independent franchise. Received 217 votes, the lowest total of any FCP candidate. Finished fifth in a field of six candidates. The winner was Marilyn Churley of the Ontario New Democratic Party.

Waterloo—Wellington: Gord Truscott[edit]

Holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree in Hotel and Food Administration from the University of Guelph, and a Master of Divinity from the Atlantic School of Theology in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Opposes abortion, gambling and the Young Offender's Act. Wrote Alone: A Grandmother's Struggle for Life about Linda Gibbons, an anti-abortion demonstrator in Toronto, Ontario. Was arrested and charged with obstruction for filming Gibbons's vigil in front of the Scott abortion clinic in 1999; he was later found not guilty. Ran in the 1999 provincial election and received 685 votes, finishing fourth in a field of five candidates. Received 978 votes in 2003, finishing last in a field of five. The winner on both occasions was Ted Arnott of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

Ran for the Christian Heritage Party during the 2000 federal election in Guelph—Wellington, and finished sixth out of eight candidates with 275 votes (Truscott appeared on the ballot as an independent candidate, as the CHP had been deregistered). The winner was Brenda Chamberlain of the Liberal Party of Canada.

Willowdale: Rina Morra[edit]

An FCP member since 1995. Works for a number of women's groups in the Toronto Italian community. Fluent in both Italian and English. Served as vice-president and director of the Percy Williams Community Association and Richmond Park Community Association. Has encouraged Italian voters to leave the Ontario Liberals for the FCP. Received 442 votes, finishing fifth in a field of six candidates. The winner was David Zimmer of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Previous candidacies:

York North: Simone Williams[edit]

A student at Trent University in Peterborough at the time of the election. Received 497 votes, finishing fifth out of five candidates. The winner was Julia Munro of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

York South—Weston: Mariangela Sanabria[edit]

An insurance agent. Received 475 votes, finishing last in a field of five candidates. The winner was Joseph Cordiano of the Ontario Liberal Party.

By-elections[edit]

Whitby—Ajax, March 30, 2006: Victor Carvalho[edit]

Carvalho was born on November 21, 1945 to a Roman Catholic family in India, and attended schools in Bombay and Nagpur. He moved to Canada on July 1, 1967, and worked as a teacher. Along with his wife, Carvalho founded the Catholicland theme park in Minesing, Ontario in 1989, and moved it to Carden in 2003.[9] The couple also established Unborn Park in 1993, to address "the memory of the unborn".[10]

He is a third degree Knight of Columbus, and a veteran member of Canada's pro-life movement.[11] He campaigned for the Christian Heritage Party federally in 2000, although he appeared on the ballot as an independent as the CHP was de-registered. He now operates the Culture-of-Life.ca and MoralParty.com websites.[12]

Electoral record
Election Division Party Votes  % Place Winner
2000 federal Simcoe—Grey NA (CHP) 246 6/6 Paul Bonwick, Liberal
provincial by-election, March 30, 2006 Whitby—Ajax FCP 102 0.30 7/7 Christine Elliott, Progressive Conservative Party

Note: Italicized numbers refer to unofficial results.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lance Anderson, "Murray is fighting yet another battle," Peterborough This Week, 19 September 2003, p. 00. See also "Correction," Peterborough This Week, 26 September 2003, p. 4, which corrects two errors in the previous article.
  2. ^ Elizabeth Bower, "Opponents weigh in," Peterborough Examiner, 28 March 2003, B1; JoElle Kovach, "Another candidate in Town Ward," Peterborough Examiner, 5 June 2003, B1; Alek Gazdic, "Same-sex marriages attack family: protester," Peterborough Examiner, 8 September 2003, B6; Clark Kim, "Education: Six candidates, six different approaches to making it work better," Peterborough This Week, 24 September 2003, p. 3.