Tornado outbreak of January 21–23, 2017

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Tornado outbreak of January 21–23, 2017
January 2017 Georgia tornado outbreak.png
Tracks of the record-breaking 42 tornadoes that touched down across Georgia on January 21–22
Type Tornado outbreak
Extratropical cyclone
Nor'easter
Winter storm
Formed January 21, 2017 (2017-01-21)
Dissipated January 24, 2017 (2017-01-24)
Tornadoes confirmed 81 confirmed
(Second-highest for a January outbreak)
Max rating1 EF3 tornado
Duration of tornado outbreak2 1 day, 23 hours, and 13 minutes
Highest winds
Largest hail 3–3.5 in (7.6–8.9 cm) diameter near Jonesville, Louisiana
Maximum snowfall or ice accretion Snow – 9.5 in (24 cm) near Saint-Pamphile, Quebec
Ice – 0.5 in (13 mm) near Jonesboro, Maine
Damage $1.3 billion (2017 USD)
Total fatalities 20 fatalities (+2 unrelated)
204 injuries
Areas affected Southeastern United States, Northeast, Canada (Quebec)

1Most severe tornado damage; see Enhanced Fujita scale 2Time from first tornado to last tornado

Part of the 2016–17 North American winter and tornado outbreaks of 2017

The tornado outbreak of January 21–23, 2017 was a prolific and deadly winter tornado outbreak that occurred across the Southeast United States. Lasting just under two days, the outbreak produced a total of 81 tornadoes, cementing its status as the second-largest January tornado outbreak and the third-largest winter tornado outbreak since 1950. Furthermore, it was the largest outbreak on record in Georgia with 42 tornadoes confirmed in the state. The most significant tornadoes were three EF3s that heavily damaged or destroyed portions of Hattiesburg, Mississippi, and Albany and Adel, Georgia. A total of 20 people were killed by tornadoes—mainly during the pre-dawn hours of the outbreak—making it the second-deadliest outbreak in January since 1950, behind the 1969 Hazlehurst, Mississippi tornado outbreak that killed 32 people.[1] In the aftermath of the outbreak, relief organizations assisted in clean-up and aid distribution. Total economic losses from the event reached at least $1.3 billion (2017 USD).

Non-tornadic impacts were also felt along the East Coast of the United States. Straight-line winds in Lake City, Florida killed one person when a tree fell on their home. The extratropical cyclone morphed into a nor’easter as it moved across the Northeast United States and Canada, producing a combination of rain and wintry precipitation, as well as strong winds. One death occurred in northern Philadelphia, Pennsylvania after flying debris struck an elderly man. Thousands of residents were left without power, and significant beach erosion was observed along the New Jersey coastline. Maximum snowfall reached nearly 10 inches (25 cm) in the hardest hit by the wintry side, mainly near southern Canada and near Quebec.

Meteorological synopsis[edit]

GOES-13 satellite imagery of the storm complex that produced the tornado outbreak on January 22

On January 17, 2017, the Storm Prediction Center (SPC) noted the potential for a high-end severe weather event to occur in the Southern United States on January 21 and 22.[2] On January 20, a large-scale, negatively tilted (aligned northwest to southeast) trough moved from the Western United States over the Great Plains,[3] Broad cyclonic flow soon became established over much of the United States, with multiple shortwave troughs embedded within. Persistent convection from the Texas coastline to Mississippi initially inhibited the northward flow of warm, moist air and by extension limited proliferation of severe thunderstorms.[4]

Later in the day, a warm front—separating moisture-rich Gulf air and modified continental-polar air[5]—developed over the southern Mississippi Valley within an environment of steep lapse rates and modest wind shear; this became the focal point for potentially tornadic storms.[6] A low-level jet subsequently developed along the coast of Texas and Louisiana that evening,[5] and thunderstorm clusters blossomed along the frontal boundary.[7] At 7:20 p.m. CST (01:20 UTC, January 21), a tornado watch was issued for extreme eastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana,[8] supplemented by another watch extending into southern Mississippi by 11:00 p.m. CST (05:00 UTC, January 21).[9]

Surface analysis by the SPC at 2:00 a.m. CST (08:00 UTC) depicting the mesoscale low over Louisiana and its warm front extending east[10]

In the pre-dawn hours of January 21, a mesoscale low consolidated near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, at the western edge of the previously established warm front. This led to enhanced low-level southerly flow over Mississippi and an increased risk of supercells embedded within the broader thunderstorm complex.[11] One of the embedded cells produced an EF3 tornado around 3:35 a.m. CST (09:35 UTC) that traveled through Lamar and Forrest counties in Mississippi.[12]

The SPC's convective outlook for January 22

After sunrise, severe storms and tornadoes continued further to the east, and the Storm Prediction Center later issued a moderate risk for parts of Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, along with an enhanced risk for parts of Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and Florida. This included a 10% risk area for tornadoes, and numerous tornadoes touched down across the threat area, several of which were strong and caused significant damage.[13] During the early morning hours of January 22, a deadly EF3 tornado produced devastating damage and obliterated a mobile home park near Adel, Georgia, killing 11 people along its path.[14] Numerous other people were injured in the state because of the storms.[15]

After sunrise, the Storm Prediction Center issued a high risk for a major severe weather and tornado outbreak across central Florida and southeastern Georgia, including a 30% risk area for tornadoes. Strong, long-track tornadoes were expected in the threat area, and it was the first time a high risk was issued since June 3, 2014.[16] In Florida and Georgia, a Particularly Dangerous Situation tornado watch was issued.[17]

Meteorologists at the Jacksonville, Florida branch of the National Weather Service stated that the event "had the potential to be one of the most severe weather outbreaks since the 1993 super storm" for northeastern Florida and southeastern Georgia.[18] Later that day, a massive EF3 wedge tornado caused severe damage in and around Albany, Georgia, killing five people and destroying many homes and businesses. A few weak tornadoes occurred in Florida during the early morning hours of January 23 before the outbreak came to an end.[19][20]

Confirmed tornadoes[edit]

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX
Confirmed tornadoes by Enhanced Fujita rating
EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5 Total
0 23 44 11 3 0 0 81

With 81 tornadoes touching down, the outbreak ranks as the second-largest January outbreak since records began in 1950, second only to the January 21–23, 1999, tornado outbreak (during which 129 tornadoes touched down). It also ranks as the third-largest winter outbreak, just behind the 2008 Super Tuesday outbreak which produced 86 tornadoes.[21] More than half of the tornadoes occurred in Georgia. With 42 confirmed in the state, the outbreak ranks as the largest on record for Georgia, surpassing the previous highest of 25 during Hurricane Ivan in 2004. Of the 42 tornadoes, 27 touched down within the county warning area of the Atlanta National Weather Service Office, the most for a two-day period. This surpassed the previous highest of 16 during Hurricane Katrina in 2005.[22] Additionally, it shattered the record for January tornadoes in the state, bringing the monthly total to 52;[21] the previous monthly record was just 15 in 1972.[21][22] Furthermore, the 20 fatalities ranks the outbreak as the deadliest in January since 1969.[21]

January 21 event[edit]

List of confirmed tornadoes – Saturday, January 21, 2017[note 1]
EF# Location County / Parish State Start Coord. Time (UTC) Path length Max width Summary Refs
EF3 NW of Purvis to Hattiesburg/Petal to NE of Runnelstown Lamar, Forrest, Perry MS 31°11′08″N 89°28′48″W / 31.1855°N 89.4799°W / 31.1855; -89.4799 (Hattiesburg (Jan. 21, EF3)) 0935–1013 31.06 mi (49.99 km) 900 yd (820 m) 4 deaths – See the section on this tornado – 57 people were injured. [23][24]
[25]
EF2 SE of Gilbertown to E of Putnam Choctaw, Marengo AL 31°50′51″N 88°17′26″W / 31.8476°N 88.2905°W / 31.8476; -88.2905 (Gilbertown (Jan. 21, EF2)) 1114–1137 20.43 mi (32.88 km) 800 yd (730 m) Five homes were destroyed, including three mobile homes, and dozens of other structures sustained varying degree of damage. Four people were injured. [26][27]
EF1 E of Wayne Marengo AL 32°05′56″N 87°46′56″W / 32.0988°N 87.7823°W / 32.0988; -87.7823 (Wayne (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1155–1201 4.20 mi (6.76 km) 900 yd (820 m) Several trees were downed, and a few outbuildings were damaged. [27]
EF1 Southern LaGrange Troup GA 32°58′45″N 85°02′55″W / 32.9792°N 85.0487°W / 32.9792; -85.0487 (LaGrange (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1349–1402 5.42 mi (8.72 km) 200 yd (180 m) A metal building had part of its roof ripped off and garage doors blown in. Homes and a church sustained minor roof damage, and a sign was blown over. A trampoline was thrown 30 yards, and trees were snapped and uprooted along the path as well. Total economic losses reached $50,000. [28]
EF1 SE of Blue Ridge Elmore AL 32°28′09″N 86°10′24″W / 32.4692°N 86.1733°W / 32.4692; -86.1733 (Blue Ridge (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1355–1356 0.68 mi (1.09 km) 200 yd (180 m) A dozen trees were downed, one of which destroyed an outbuilding. [27]
EF1 Wetumpka Elmore AL 32°31′48″N 86°13′04″W / 32.5299°N 86.2179°W / 32.5299; -86.2179 (Wetumpka (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1355–1358 1.54 mi (2.48 km) 450 yd (410 m) Several structures in Wetumpka were damaged, including a church. Trees were snapped and uprooted as well. [27]
EF0 S of Emerald Mountain Elmore AL 32°26′09″N 86°06′23″W / 32.4359°N 86.1064°W / 32.4359; -86.1064 (Emerald Mountain (Jan. 21, EF0)) 1357 0.21 mi (0.34 km) 90 yd (82 m) Fencing, trees, and metal siding were damaged at Emerald Mountain Christian Academy. [27]
EF1 W of Marvyn Macon, Lee AL 32°28′26″N 85°27′21″W / 32.4740°N 85.4557°W / 32.4740; -85.4557 (Marvyn (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1448–1450 2.84 mi (4.57 km) 100 yd (91 m) Two homes suffered roof damage and several trees were snapped. [27]
EF0 S of Auburn Lee AL 32°31′36″N 85°28′57″W / 32.5267°N 85.4825°W / 32.5267; -85.4825 (Auburn (Jan. 21, EF0)) 1449–1453 2.38 mi (3.83 km) 150 yd (140 m) Several trees were snapped or uprooted. [27]
EF1 N of Goshen to Troy to E of Louisville Pike, Barbour AL 31°47′13″N 86°08′04″W / 31.7870°N 86.1345°W / 31.7870; -86.1345 (Goshen (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1455–1538 37.47 mi (60.30 km) 400 yd (370 m) A mobile home was severely damaged, injuring two occupants. Minor roof and gutter damage was inflicted to other homes, outbuildings were damaged or destroyed, and groves of trees were snapped or uprooted by this long-track but weak tornado. Damage to trees occurred in Troy, one of which was uprooted and landed on a home, causing structural damage. Near the end of the path, homes sustained minor shingle damage in the northern part of Louisville. [27]
EF0 N of Beauregard Lee AL 32°33′45″N 85°21′26″W / 32.5626°N 85.3572°W / 32.5626; -85.3572 (Beauregard (Jan. 21, EF0)) 1456–1458 1.07 mi (1.72 km) 150 yd (140 m) A weak tornado damaged shingles and snapped or uprooted several trees. [27]
EF0 SSE of Opelika Lee AL 32°36′50″N 85°22′04″W / 32.6138°N 85.3677°W / 32.6138; -85.3677 (Opelika (Jan. 21, EF0)) 1500–1501 0.82 mi (1.32 km) 150 yd (140 m) Several structures sustained damage to their shingles, and numerous pine trees were downed. [27]
EF0 NW of Crawford Lee AL 32°28′52″N 85°13′08″W / 32.4811°N 85.2189°W / 32.4811; -85.2189 (Crawford (Jan. 21, EF0)) 1508 0.13 mi (0.21 km) 50 yd (46 m) Several roofs and wooden fences were damaged. [27]
EF1 Smiths Station Lee AL 32°31′46″N 85°06′34″W / 32.5294°N 85.1094°W / 32.5294; -85.1094 (Smiths Station (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1519–1520 0.95 mi (1.53 km) 300 yd (270 m) Dozens of trees were downed. Many buildings at the Smiths Station School Athletic Complex were destroyed and many others were damaged. [27]
EF1 WSW of Cataula to W of Waverly Hall Harris GA 32°40′52″N 84°56′46″W / 32.6812°N 84.9462°W / 32.6812; -84.9462 (Fortson (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1533–1551 10.84 mi (17.45 km) 400 yd (370 m) Several homes sustained substantial roof damage, an outdoor shelter was destroyed, and numerous large trees were snapped or uprooted. Intense pressure falls near the tornado caused four to six biscuit cans at a super market to pop open. Total economic losses reached $75,000. [29]
EF0 SW of Woodland Talbot GA 32°46′06″N 84°38′16″W / 32.7684°N 84.6379°W / 32.7684; -84.6379 (Woodland (Jan. 21, EF0)) 1606–1610 1.92 mi (3.09 km) 100 yd (91 m) Numerous trees were snapped in a wilderness area. Total economic losses reached $10,000. [30]
EF1 NE of Woodland to SSE of Sunset Village Talbot, Upson GA 32°48′35″N 84°31′59″W / 32.8097°N 84.5331°W / 32.8097; -84.5331 (Woodland (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1614–1628 9.52 mi (15.32 km) 300 yd (270 m) Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted, a small shed was destroyed, and a small building was overturned. Total economic losses reached $65,000. [31][32]
EF1 E of Junction City to SSW of Salem Taylor GA 32°35′37″N 84°23′59″W / 32.5937°N 84.3997°W / 32.5937; -84.3997 (Junction City (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1618–1633 12.25 mi (19.71 km) 400 yd (370 m) Two metal barns were destroyed, a small silo was ripped out of the ground and thrown over 300 yd (270 m), and numerous trees were snapped or uprooted. A single-story home and a trailer sustained significant roof, window, and siding damage. Total economic losses reached $100,000. [33]
EF2 ESE of Sprewell Bluff State Park to N of Sunset Village Talbot, Upson GA 32°49′54″N 84°25′26″W / 32.8318°N 84.4239°W / 32.8318; -84.4239 (Thomaston (Jan. 21, EF2)) 1622–1629 5.68 mi (9.14 km) 300 yd (270 m) Hundreds of trees were snapped or uprooted. One home was severely damaged while several others sustained less severe roof damage. Total economic losses reached $300,000. [34][35]
EF1 S of Sunset Village to Western Thomaston Upson GA 32°50′52″N 84°24′28″W / 32.8477°N 84.4077°W / 32.8477; -84.4077 (Thomaston (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1625–1634 5.26 mi (8.47 km) 200 yd (180 m) One home sustained significant roof damage, a second sustained moderate roof damage, and a third had its porch ripped off. Numerous trees and power lines were downed as the tornado entered the western part of Thomaston before dissipating. Total economic losses reached $75,000. [36]
EF0 SW of Hannahs Mill Upson GA 32°55′06″N 84°21′36″W / 32.9182°N 84.36°W / 32.9182; -84.36 (Hannahs Mill (Jan. 21, EF0)) 1632–1634 0.78 mi (1.26 km) 100 yd (91 m) Numerous trees were downed or snapped, causing a car accident. Total economic losses reached $20,000. [37]
EF1 NE of Hannahs Mill Upson GA 32°57′00″N 84°18′47″W / 32.9499°N 84.3131°W / 32.9499; -84.3131 (Delray (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1639–1641 1.87 mi (3.01 km) 175 yd (160 m) A home had a portion of its roof ripped off, numerous trees were snapped or uprooted, and an outbuilding lost wood or metal roof panels. Total economic losses reached $20,000. [38]
EF1 S of Marshallville Macon GA 32°24′40″N 84°00′32″W / 32.4111°N 84.009°W / 32.4111; -84.009 (Marshallville (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1659–1707 8.92 mi (14.36 km) 100 yd (91 m) Three irrigation systems were overturned, structures sustained minor roof damage, and trees were damaged. Total economic losses reached $30,000. [39]
EF0 SE of Forsyth Monroe GA 32°54′41″N 83°53′50″W / 32.9113°N 83.8972°W / 32.9113; -83.8972 (Forsyth (Jan. 21, EF0)) 1708–1720 8.84 mi (14.23 km) 250 yd (230 m) Several dozen trees were snapped or uprooted, and a residence sustained minor roof damage. Total economic losses reached $15,000. [40]
EF2 SE of Fort Valley to Warner Robins Peach, Houston GA 32°30′41″N 83°47′24″W / 32.5114°N 83.7901°W / 32.5114; -83.7901 (Fort Valley (Jan. 21, EF2)) 1711–1729 12.85 mi (20.68 km) 250 yd (230 m) A rain-wrapped tornado damaged dozens of homes, snapped or uprooted countless trees, and downed brick fences in Warner Robins. One home had much its roof torn off, while others were damaged to a lesser degree. Projectiles were driven through exterior walls and into the ground. A sports complex and a business were damaged, and 15 to 20 mobile homes were severely damaged in a mobile home park. Two large HVAC units were tossed 50 yd (46 m) from the top of a Walmart, where the auto bay doors on the back of the store were blown in, the roof was lifted, and rafters were twisted. Total economic losses reached $295,000. [41][42]
[43][44]
EF0 WSW of Danville Twiggs GA 32°32′06″N 83°23′06″W / 32.535°N 83.385°W / 32.535; -83.385 (Danville (Jan. 21, EF0)) 1746–1752 4.23 mi (6.81 km) 100 yd (91 m) Approximately 100 trees were downed, and one section of an irrigation system was overturned. Total economic losses reached $50,000. [45]
EF1 NE of Cochran Bleckley GA 32°26′38″N 83°18′47″W / 32.444°N 83.313°W / 32.444; -83.313 (Cochran (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1750–1755 4.32 mi (6.95 km) 100 yd (91 m) A fence and numerous trees were downed. The roof was lifted off a small barn, three homes sustained roof damage, and an abandoned fire station was damaged. Total economic losses reached $30,000. [46]
EF1 E of Irwinton Wilkinson GA 32°47′49″N 83°10′12″W / 32.797°N 83.170°W / 32.797; -83.170 (Irwinton (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1754–1811 5.84 mi (9.40 km) 100 yd (91 m) Multiple trees were snapped or uprooted. Total economic losses reached $10,000. [47]
EF0 Lake Sinclair Putnam GA 33°10′45″N 83°20′35″W / 33.1792°N 83.3430°W / 33.1792; -83.3430 (Lake Sinclair (Jan. 21, EF0)) 1810–1812 0.57 mi (0.92 km) 50 yd (46 m) Several softwood trees were snapped or uprooted, damaging some homes. Total economic losses reached $25,000. [48]
EF0 N of Dublin Laurens GA 32°40′16″N 82°54′54″W / 32.671°N 82.915°W / 32.671; -82.915 (Dublin (Jan. 21, EF0)) 1820–1826 2.18 mi (3.51 km) 85 yd (78 m) A couple dozen trees were uprooted. Total economic losses reached $12,000. [49]
EF1 W of Deepstep Hancock, Baldwin GA 33°03′09″N 83°05′48″W / 33.0525°N 83.0967°W / 33.0525; -83.0967 (Milledgeville (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1828–1830 0.53 mi (0.85 km) 70 yd (64 m) Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted. One residence had a portion of its tin roof peeled off while a second sustained damage to its awning and siding. Total economic losses reached $10,000. [50][51]
EF0 SE of Wrightsville Johnson GA 32°41′17″N 82°38′28″W / 32.688°N 82.641°W / 32.688; -82.641 (Wrightsville (Jan. 21, EF0)) 1839–1848 6.39 mi (10.28 km) 100 yd (91 m) A small outbuilding had its metal roof panels ripped off, a metal building sustained major roof damage, and multiple trees were snapped or uprooted. Total economic losses reached $10,000. [52]
EF1 S of Tennille Washington GA 32°53′46″N 82°49′12″W / 32.896°N 82.820°W / 32.896; -82.820 (Tennille (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1840–1846 2.59 mi (4.17 km) 300 yd (270 m) One mobile home was destroyed while another was severely damaged. Trees were damaged. Total economic losses reached $30,000. [53]
EF1 ESE of Tennille Washington GA 32°55′26″N 82°46′44″W / 32.924°N 82.779°W / 32.924; -82.779 (Tennille (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1845–1849 1.3 mi (2.1 km) 300 yd (270 m) Shingles were torn from roofs, a shed was destroyed, and a mobile home was rolled and destroyed. Total economic losses reached $50,000. [54]
EF1 E of Tennille Washington GA 32°57′00″N 82°43′48″W / 32.950°N 82.730°W / 32.950; -82.730 (Tennille (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1846–1859 8.38 mi (13.49 km) 300 yd (270 m) Numerous trees were downed, including dozens of pecan trees which were uprooted in an orchard. Total economic losses reached $60,000. [55]
EF0 NW of Midville Burke GA 32°51′36″N 82°17′32″W / 32.8601°N 82.2922°W / 32.8601; -82.2922 (Midville (Jan. 21, EF0)) 1909–1912 1.3 mi (2.1 km) 250 yd (230 m) An irrigation system was turned over and several trees were downed. [56]
EF0 SW of Canoochee Emanuel GA 32°39′35″N 82°11′05″W / 32.6596°N 82.1848°W / 32.6596; -82.1848 (Canoochee (Jan. 21, EF0)) 1911–1915 4.8 mi (7.7 km) 200 yd (180 m) A residence had its porch blown off, an outbuilding was destroyed, an outbuilding had its metal roofing panels ripped off, and numerous trees were snapped or uprooted. Total economic losses reached $50,000. [57]
EF0 SSE of Vidette Burke GA 32°57′29″N 82°09′54″W / 32.9581°N 82.1649°W / 32.9581; -82.1649 (Rosier (Jan. 21, EF0)) 1923–1925 1.5 mi (2.4 km) 100 yd (91 m) The roof of a metal barn and several calf weaning huts were damaged. [58]
EF1 ESE of Waynesboro Burke GA 33°03′53″N 81°57′51″W / 33.0648°N 81.9642°W / 33.0648; -81.9642 (Waynesboro (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1940–1945 1 mi (1.6 km) 75 yd (69 m) The exterior wall of a metal building was shredded, and numerous trees were snapped or uprooted. [59]
EF0 SW of Hiltonia Screven GA 32°49′N 81°46′W / 32.82°N 81.76°W / 32.82; -81.76 (Hiltonia (Jan. 21, EF0)) 1942–1945 0.69 mi (1.11 km) 50 yd (46 m) A carport attached to a residence was damaged, metal roofing was ripped from four storage buildings, and significant tree damage was observed. [60]
EF0 W of Glennville Tattnall GA 31°56′N 82°05′W / 31.93°N 82.09°W / 31.93; -82.09 (Glennville (Jan. 21, EF0)) 1950–1952 0.91 mi (1.46 km) 250 yd (230 m) Five chicken coops were heavily damaged, with metal roofing scattered 500 yd (460 m) downwind. A home sustained minor shingle damage, and several trees were downed or uprooted. [61]
EF1 NE of Sylvania Screven GA 32°47′N 81°37′W / 32.78°N 81.61°W / 32.78; -81.61 (Sylvania (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1952–1957 2.7 mi (4.3 km) 525 yd (480 m) A motor vehicle was rolled downhill, the northeast wall of a metal firehouse was ripped off, and metal roofing was torn from several houses and outbuildings. A stop sign was tossed 50 yd (46 m), numerous trees were snapped or uprooted, and six headstones weighing up 200–400 lbs (90–180 kg) were toppled. [62]
EF2 N of Barnwell to NNW of Denmark Barnwell, Bamberg SC 33°17′39″N 81°24′20″W / 33.2942°N 81.4055°W / 33.2942; -81.4055 (Barnwell (Jan. 21, EF2)) 2040–2102 15.9 mi (25.6 km) 1,600 yd (1,500 m) Hundreds of softwood and hardwood trees were snapped or uprooted by this large wedge tornado, with numerous trees landing on homes and causing structural damage. Several structures were heavily damaged or destroyed, most notably a mobile home which was rolled several times and had its floors separated from the undercarriage. The inside occupant was injured. Several chicken houses suffered extensive roof damage. [63]
EF1 NW of Cope Orangeburg SC 33°22′34″N 81°05′02″W / 33.3761°N 81.0839°W / 33.3761; -81.0839 (Cope (Jan. 21, EF1)) 2109–2119 5.47 mi (8.80 km) 400 yd (370 m) Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted, three mobile homes were heavily damaged, and a metal farm building collapsed. [64]
EF2 N of Scottsville Harrison TX 32°31′12″N 94°15′10″W / 32.5199°N 94.2529°W / 32.5199; -94.2529 (Scottsville (Jan. 21, EF2)) 2218–2235 6.93 mi (11.15 km) 230 yd (210 m) Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted, and numerous power lines were downed. One home had its roof ripped off while several others were damaged to a lesser extent, many by falling trees. Mobile homes were also damaged, outbuildings were destroyed, and a vehicle was overturned as well. Total economic losses reached $1,000,000. [65]
EF1 WNW of Jefferson Marion TX 32°46′21″N 94°25′04″W / 32.7724°N 94.4179°W / 32.7724; -94.4179 (Jefferson (Jan. 21, EF1)) 2219–2223 0.81 mi (1.30 km) 100 yd (91 m) Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted, and numerous power lines were downed. A single-wide mobile home had its roof ripped off, and a tree landed on an outbuilding. Total economic losses reached $250,000. [66]
EF2 NNW of Uncertain, TX to SW of Rodessa, LA Marion (TX), Cass (TX), Caddo (LA) TX, LA 32°48′31″N 94°11′46″W / 32.8087°N 94.1962°W / 32.8087; -94.1962 (Uncertain (Jan. 21, EF2)) 2250–2328 13.36 mi (21.50 km) 800 yd (730 m) A strong wedge tornado passed near the town of Vivian, snapping and uprooting numerous trees and downing many power lines. Several vehicles were pushed, a party barge boat was moved 200 yd (180 m) into a grove of trees, and a travel trailer was flipped. The roof was ripped off a house, and a mobile home was shifted off its foundation. A woman was taking shelter in a bathtub inside the house that had its torn off. The tornado carried her through the air while she was in the tub and then deposited her in a wooded area, where she remained in the bathtub unharmed. Total economic losses reached $900,000. [67][68]
[69]
EF2 ESE of Plain Dealing to W of Cullen Bossier, Webster LA 32°53′18″N 93°38′36″W / 32.8883°N 93.6432°W / 32.8883; -93.6432 (Plain Dealing (Jan. 21, EF2)) 2312–2337 10.79 mi (17.36 km) 990 yd (910 m) Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted, and numerous power lines were downed by this large wedge tornado. Two mobile homes were rolled and completely destroyed, several outbuildings were destroyed, and several houses sustained damage to their roofs and walls. In Webster Parish, a building in an ATV park had part of its roof removed. One person was knocked unconscious by a flying piece of lumber. Total economic losses reached $825,000. [70][71]
EF1 S of Shongaloo Webster LA 32°53′15″N 93°19′09″W / 32.8875°N 93.3193°W / 32.8875; -93.3193 (Shongaloo (Jan. 21, EF1)) 2355–0007 3.5 mi (5.6 km) 350 yd (320 m) Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted; a tree fell on a carport and a portion of a mobile home. Total economic losses reached $10,000. [72]
EF2 NE of Natchez Natchitoches LA 31°40′57″N 93°02′17″W / 31.6824°N 93.0381°W / 31.6824; -93.0381 (Natchez (Jan. 21, EF2)) 2356–0003 2.04 mi (3.28 km) 300 yd (270 m) Numerous power lines were downed, and numerous trees were snapped or uprooted. Five homes sustained significant damage, including one that had its roof ripped off and three exterior walls collapsed. Several outbuildings were severely damaged. One person suffered an arm injury. Total economic losses reached $500,000. [73]
EF1 ESE of Aloha Grant LA 31°33′24″N 92°44′50″W / 31.5566°N 92.7473°W / 31.5566; -92.7473 (Aloha (Jan. 21, EF1)) 0100–0113 2.23 mi (3.59 km) 150 yd (140 m) Numerous power lines were downed, and numerous trees were snapped or uprooted; fallen trees severely damaged one home and impacted a cemetery. A single-wide mobile home was flipped and rolled about 25 yards (23 m), injuring a woman inside. Several barns or outbuildings were damaged, a 3,000 lb (1,400 kg) trailer was flipped, killing a cow, and a large television antenna was toppled onto a home. [74]
EF1 WSW of El Dorado Union AR 33°10′23″N 92°48′25″W / 33.1731°N 92.807°W / 33.1731; -92.807 (El Dorado (Jan. 21, EF1)) 0104–0109 2.89 mi (4.65 km) 75 yd (69 m) Several pine trees were snapped or uprooted, one of which fell onto a home, damaging a small antenna tower. [75]
EF0 Lawson Union AR 33°11′27″N 92°28′42″W / 33.1908°N 92.4782°W / 33.1908; -92.4782 (Lawson (Jan. 21, EF0)) 0138–0140 0.61 mi (0.98 km) 50 yd (46 m) A single-wide mobile home had a portion of its roof peeled back and a portion of one wall detached. A few small trees were snapped. [76]
EF1 S of Georgetown Grant LA 31°37′43″N 92°25′12″W / 31.6287°N 92.4199°W / 31.6287; -92.4199 (Georgetown (Jan. 21, EF1)) 0151–0154 1.24 mi (2.00 km) 150 yd (140 m) Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted, one of which caused severe damage to a home. Shingles were removed from several structures. [77]
EF1 Jena LaSalle LA 31°40′45″N 92°09′22″W / 31.6792°N 92.1562°W / 31.6792; -92.1562 (Jena (Jan. 21, EF1)) 0229–0230 0.16 mi (0.26 km) 100 yd (91 m) Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted in town, one of which fell on a church. A wooden barn was damaged, a gas station canopy was blown 50 yd (46 m), and a local business' brick facade collapsed. Storage buildings were heavily damaged as well. [78]
EF0 NW of Hamburg Ashley AR 33°14′21″N 91°49′12″W / 33.2393°N 91.82°W / 33.2393; -91.82 (Hamburg (Jan. 21, EF0)) 0245–0246 0.67 mi (1.08 km) 50 yd (46 m) Picture evidence of a brief tornado was relayed. [79]
EF0 SE of Marion Union LA 32°51′59″N 92°10′00″W / 32.8663°N 92.1666°W / 32.8663; -92.1666 (Marion (Jan. 21, EF0)) 0248–0249 0.62 mi (1.00 km) 50 yd (46 m) A metal shed sustained considerable damage, an outbuilding had its metal roof ripped off, and a few small trees were snapped. [80]
EF1 NNE of Mer Rouge Morehouse LA 32°49′16″N 91°47′14″W / 32.8212°N 91.7873°W / 32.8212; -91.7873 (Mer Rouge (Jan. 21, EF1)) 0304–0323 8.87 mi (14.27 km) 300 yd (270 m) Mt. Olive Missionary Baptist Church and a few houses sustained roof damage. A television antenna was bent, numerous trees were snapped or uprooted, and power poles were toppled. A shed building roof collapsed, tin was blown around, and a large metal and PVC tank were blown over. [81]
EF2 E of Meridian Station Lauderdale MS 32°29′29″N 88°36′07″W / 32.4914°N 88.602°W / 32.4914; -88.602 (Meridian Station (Jan. 21, EF2)) 0444–0454 7.28 mi (11.72 km) 550 yd (500 m) Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted, many of which caused structural damage upon falling. A church sustained minor roof damage. Many mobile homes were thrown or rolled, destroying four and injuring an occupant in the process. The undercarriage of one mobile home was found wrapped around a tree. [82]

January 22 event[edit]

List of confirmed tornadoes – Sunday, January 22, 2017[note 1]
EF# Location County / Parish State Start Coord. Time (UTC) Path length Max width Summary Refs
EF0 S of Coaling Tuscaloosa AL 33°02′38″N 87°20′28″W / 33.0439°N 87.3412°W / 33.0439; -87.3412 (Coaling (Jan. 22, EF0)) 0636–0637 0.03 mi (0.048 km) 200 yd (180 m) A brief tornado downed a few trees and damaged one home. [27]
EF2 N of Thomasville to NE of Pavo Thomas, Brooks GA 30°53′59″N 83°58′56″W / 30.8997°N 83.9821°W / 30.8997; -83.9821 (Thomasville (Jan. 22, EF2)) 0756–0818 18.67 mi (30.05 km) 700 yd (640 m) A house lost a significant amount of roof deck, a mobile home was completely destroyed, and numerous pine trees were snapped or uprooted. A few other houses were damaged to a lesser degree. Three people were injured. [83][84]
EF3 WSW of Barney to S of Adel to SE of Nashville Brooks, Cook, Berrien GA 30°59′59″N 83°35′03″W / 30.9998°N 83.5841°W / 30.9998; -83.5841 (Adel (Jan. 22, EF3)) 0829–0858 24.66 mi (39.69 km) 700 yd (640 m) 11 deaths – See section on this tornado – 45 people were injured. [85][86]
[87]
EF1 SW of Pembroke Liberty GA 32°01′N 81°40′W / 32.01°N 81.67°W / 32.01; -81.67 (Pembroke (Jan. 22, EF1)) 0925–0927 0.59 mi (0.95 km) 250 yd (230 m) At least 100 trees were damaged. [88]
EF1 Baxley Jeff Davis, Appling GA 31°44′25″N 82°32′34″W / 31.7404°N 82.5428°W / 31.7404; -82.5428 (Baxley (Jan. 22, EF1)) 1052–1058 11.12 mi (17.90 km) 1,900 yd (1,700 m) EF1 damage was inflicted to Zoar Methodist Church and surrounding areas as a result of this large wedge tornado. [89]
EF1 NW of Valdosta Lowndes GA 30°53′23″N 83°23′21″W / 30.8897°N 83.3891°W / 30.8897; -83.3891 (Valdosta (Jan. 22, EF1)) 1200–1204 4.84 mi (7.79 km) 400 yd (370 m) Multiple homes had shingles ripped off, a large barn was destroyed, and numerous large pine trees were snapped or uprooted. [90]
EF1 E of Headland Henry AL 31°20′16″N 85°15′05″W / 31.3377°N 85.2515°W / 31.3377; -85.2515 (Headland (Jan. 22, EF1)) 1902–1914 5.52 mi (8.88 km) 100 yd (91 m) A mobile home was destroyed, a few structures sustained minor roof damage, and numerous trees were snapped or uprooted. [91]
EF1 NW of Inverness Bullock AL 32°07′31″N 85°57′25″W / 32.1254°N 85.9570°W / 32.1254; -85.9570 (Inverness (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1906–1911 2.20 mi (3.54 km) 330 yd (300 m) At least one home and many trees suffered damage. [27]
EF2 NNE of Bluffton to E of Coleman Clay, Calhoun, Randolph GA 31°34′13″N 84°51′55″W / 31.5704°N 84.8654°W / 31.5704; -84.8654 (Bluffton (Jan. 22, EF2)) 1938–1952 12.03 mi (19.36 km) 400 yd (370 m) A mobile home was flipped, injuring the occupant. Two homes had their entire roofing structures ripped off while several others sustained lesser damage. Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted. [92][93]
[94]
EF0 Southwestern Auburn Lee AL 32°31′49″N 85°33′26″W / 32.5302°N 85.5572°W / 32.5302; -85.5572 (Auburn (Jan. 21, EF0)) 1946–1956 4.92 mi (7.92 km) 200 yd (180 m) The roof of a mobile home was peeled back, apartment buildings sustained shingle damage, and small pine trees were snapped or uprooted. [27]
EF1 NE of Apalachicola Franklin FL 29°49′18″N 84°55′08″W / 29.8217°N 84.9188°W / 29.8217; -84.9188 (Apalachicola (Jan. 21, EF1)) 1950–1954 2.36 mi (3.80 km) 350 yd (320 m) Pine trees were snapped or uprooted. [95]
EF1 Western Opelika Lee AL 32°37′34″N 85°25′15″W / 32.6262°N 85.4207°W / 32.6262; -85.4207 (Opelika (Jan. 21, EF1)) 2000–2007 3.09 mi (4.97 km) 540 yd (490 m) Homes were damaged, including one small house that lost most of its roof. Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted, some of which landed on structures. [27]
EF3 SE of Albany to W of Abbeville Dougherty, Worth, Turner, Crisp, Wilcox GA 31°26′14″N 84°20′41″W / 31.4373°N 84.3447°W / 31.4373; -84.3447 (Albany (Jan. 22, EF3)) 2015–2127 70.69 mi (113.76 km) 2,200 yd (2,000 m) 5 deaths – See section on this tornado [96][97]
[98][99]
[100]
EF1 Cordele Crisp GA 31°54′58″N 83°48′29″W / 31.916°N 83.808°W / 31.916; -83.808 (Cordele (Jan. 22, EF1)) 2052–2102 6.93 mi (11.15 km) 300 yd (270 m) Homes and mobile homes sustained roof damage in town, including 81 mobile homes at the Shady Lane mobile home park. Trees were downed as well. [101]
EF1 N of Cochran Bleckley GA 32°25′19″N 83°21′32″W / 32.4220°N 83.3588°W / 32.4220; -83.3588 (Cochran (Jan. 22, EF1)) 2115–2119 2.24 mi (3.60 km) 100 yd (91 m) Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted. [102]
EF0 NW of Cary Bleckley GA 32°31′26″N 83°19′01″W / 32.524°N 83.317°W / 32.524; -83.317 (Cary (Jan. 22, EF0)) 2122–2123 0.56 mi (0.90 km) 50 yd (46 m) A few trees were uprooted. [103]
EF1 NNE of Willacoochee Atkinson, Coffee GA 31°24′07″N 83°01′41″W / 31.4020°N 83.0281°W / 31.4020; -83.0281 (Willacoochee (Jan. 22, EF1)) 2147–2154 3.11 mi (5.01 km) 1,200 yd (1,100 m) Four chicken houses were damaged, of which two were completely destroyed. [104]
EF1 Woodbine Camden GA 30°54′03″N 81°51′28″W / 30.9007°N 81.8579°W / 30.9007; -81.8579 (Woodbine (Jan. 22, EF1)) 2326–2347 16.64 mi (26.78 km) 120 yd (110 m) Homes in a subdivision were heavily damaged at high-end EF1 strength. Significant tree damage was observed, with some trees landing on and damaging homes. [105]
EF1 W of Woodbine Camden GA 30°57′15″N 81°53′25″W / 30.9541°N 81.8902°W / 30.9541; -81.8902 (Woodbine (Jan. 22, EF1)) 2329–2331 1.65 mi (2.66 km) 120 yd (110 m) A tornado debris signature was observed on Dual Pol radar products. [106]

January 23 event[edit]

List of confirmed tornadoes – Monday, January 23, 2017[note 1]
EF# Location County / Parish State Start Coord. Time (UTC) Path length Max width Summary Refs
EF1 N of Loxahatchee Palm Beach FL 26°47′23″N 80°19′38″W / 26.7896°N 80.3272°W / 26.7896; -80.3272 (Loxahatchee (Jan. 23, EF1)) 0625–0630 3.22 mi (5.18 km) 90 yd (82 m) Trees and fences were damaged. [107]
EF1 Palm Beach Gardens Palm Beach FL 26°51′35″N 80°08′36″W / 26.8596°N 80.1432°W / 26.8596; -80.1432 (Palm Beach Gardens (Jan. 23, EF1)) 0640–0649 5.79 mi (9.32 km) 130 yd (120 m) This tornado caused damage in the Palm Beach Gardens neighborhood. Damage occurred to the private high school's football stadium and the public high school's building and baseball stadium. Minor damage also occurred at Juno Beach Pier and a nearby mobile home park. Total economic losses reached at least $500,000 to $1,000,000. [108]
EF1 Miami Springs to Hialeah Miami-Dade FL 25°48′58″N 80°19′33″W / 25.8162°N 80.3258°W / 25.8162; -80.3258 (Miami Springs (Jan. 23, EF1)) 0845–0848 2.79 mi (4.49 km) 123 yd (112 m) A weak tornado touched down just east of the Palmetto Expressway in Miami Springs and tracked east-northeast. Damage continued into Hialeah near a water plant before the tornado lifted. [109]

Notable tornadoes[edit]

Hattiesburg – Petal, Mississippi[edit]

Doppler radar scan of the EF3 tornado as it was striking Hattiesburg.

Early in the morning on January 21, a large tornado touched down northwest of Purvis in Lamar County, Mississippi, at 3:35 a.m. EST (08:35 UTC). The tornado initially caused EF1 damage, snapping and uprooting many trees and destroying small sheds. A house sustained minor roof damage and collapse of its carport, and a power pole was snapped as well. Further to the northeast, the tornado reached EF2 intensity as it ripped the roof off of a well-built brick home and destroyed outbuildings. As the tornado approached the Forrest County line, EF2 damage continued as another home had its roof torn off, a mobile home was completely destroyed, and a billboard pole was snapped. Other homes in this area sustained minor roof damage, and trees and power poles were downed. The tornado intensified to EF3 strength shortly after it crossed the Forrest County line and entered residential areas of southwestern Hattiesburg, where multiple well-constructed brick homes had roofs torn off and exterior walls collapsed, and an elderly woman was killed.[110] The tornado continued producing EF3 damage as it crossed Veterans Memorial Drive, snapping metal power pylons and severely damaging two buildings at Living Word Church. Maintaining its strength, the tornado moved across U.S. Route 49 and through a residential area, damaging several homes and destroying the top floor of a church. The tornado then tore directly through the William Carey University campus, resulting in severe structural damage and tossing and damaging numerous vehicles in the parking lots. Multiple large, multi-story brick buildings had windows blown out, roofs ripped off, and top floor exterior walls collapsed. Light poles were downed at the ball field as well.[110]

Multiple homes destroyed at EF3 intensity in the eastern part of Petal.

Past William Carey University, the tornado weakened to EF2 strength as it moved through residential areas and a mobile home park to the southeast of downtown Hattiesburg. Many large trees were downed, some of which landed on and completely crushed sections of frame homes and mobile homes, resulting in three fatalities in this area. Several other frame homes had roofs and walls ripped off, a fire station was damaged, and a church lost large sections of its roof as well. The tornado then entered Petal, destroying large commercial sheds, damaging roofs and collapsing cinder block walls at several businesses, snapping many trees and power poles, and tearing large sections of roofing from homes. As the tornado impacted the eastern part of Petal, it restrengthened to EF3 intensity as multiple well-built frame homes were destroyed, some of which only had a few walls left standing. Other homes, a church, and a strip mall in this area were heavily damaged at EF2 strength as well.[110] The tornado maintained EF3 strength as it continued to the northeast outside of Petal, toppling two metal truss towers to the ground. A brick frame home in this area was completely leveled after a nearby mobile home was thrown into it. Beyond this point, the tornado weakened back to EF2 strength as it approached the Perry County line, snapping and uprooting numerous large trees. After crossing into Perry County, the tornado damaged or destroyed several outbuildings and mobile homes, snapped and uprooted numerous trees, ripped the roof off of a frame home, and caused minor damage to several other homes near Runnelstown before dissipating. Damage intensity along this final portion of the path ranged from EF1 to EF2. Four people were killed by this tornado along its 31.3 mi (50.4 km) long path, and 57 others were injured.[111]

Hattiesburg and Petal had previously sustained major damage from an EF4 tornado that struck on February 10, 2013. However, damage from the 2017 tornado was more severe in Petal.[112] Following the tornado, members of the Jackson Salvation Army were sent to Hattiesburg to provide assistance.[113] Volunteers traveled from across the nation to assist with cleanup efforts, some of whom also provided assistance after the 2013 tornado.[114]

Adel, Georgia[edit]

A double-wide mobile home destroyed by the tornado in southwestern Berrien County.

Around 3:29 a.m. EST (08:29 UTC) on January 22,[115] what was to become a deadly and destructive EF3 tornado first touched down as an EF1 along Georgia State Route 122 to the west-southwest of Barney in Brooks County, Georgia. Tracking east-northeast, the tornado snapped or uprooted multiple trees and shifted a barn off of its foundation before it quickly intensified to EF3 strength. A business in this area had two of its concrete exterior walls blown out.[110] A strapped-down mobile home was tossed about 100 ft (30 m) and destroyed on impact, killing two occupants.[115] A third of the second story of a well-built brick house was ripped off, and a wood-framed home was shifted about 12 ft (3.7 m) off its foundation. Debarking of trees occurred in this area as well.[115] As the tornado passed just north of Barney, it abruptly turned northeast before entering Cook County.[110]

Maintaining EF3 intensity, the tornado passed just south of Adel and struck the Sunshine Acres mobile home park, causing tremendous damage.[115] Of the park's roughly 100 homes,[116] 45 were destroyed—35 of which were obliterated—with debris swept into piles along the south end of the development. Seven fatalities took place in Sunshine Acres.[115] A survivor reported seeing a girl thrown into a ditch and a mother and son crushed underneath their home when it was thrown on top of them.[116] A brick home had most of its second floor removed and two first floor exterior walls collapsed. Another home built of concrete blocks was destroyed, and a nearby farm had several concrete anchors for a large metal structure ripped from the ground. After entering Berrien County, EF3 damage continued as another wood-framed home lost most of its second floor, trees sustained debarking, a well-strapped-down mobile home was tossed into nearby trees, and most of the roof to a brick home was removed. An add-on to the brick home was crushed by a very large tree, killing two occupants. The tornado eventually dissipated around 3:58 a.m. EST (08:58 UTC) roughly 4 mi (6.4 km) southeast of Nashville after causing some EF2 damage near U.S. Route 129.[115]

Overall, the tornado killed 11 people along a 24.88 mi (40.04 km) track lasting 29 minutes.[115] Following the tornado, Georgia State Patrol troopers blocked off access to the community, eventually allowing residents to return on January 24.[117]

Albany–Ashburn–Rochelle, Georgia[edit]

A map of the tornado's damage swath extending from Dougherty County to Wilcox County; areas highlighted in orange represent EF3-assessed damage.

The most intense and longest lived tornado of the outbreak was a massive, rain-wrapped wedge tornado that began in southern Dougherty County, Georgia during the late afternoon hours of January 22. The tornado touched down at 3:15 p.m. EST (20:15 UTC) north of Newton. The first evidence of damage was at the intersection of Tarvis Road and Tarvis Lane, where the trunks of softwood trees were snapped (consistent with an EF1 tornado). From there, the tornado moved northeast at an average of 59 mph (95 km/h), causing EF2-level tree damage adjacent to Newton Road. Hundreds of large trees were snapped, twisted, and denuded in this area. Two homes sustained minor damage to their siding, gutters, and roofs. EF2 damage continued as the tornado entered Radium Springs, where several houses lost significant portions of their roofs and sustained damage to their porches. Many trees were snapped and uprooted, a poorly-constructed home on stilts was mostly collapsed, and a second house was shifted completely off its foundation and was severely damaged. A large retail building along the Liberty Expressway had cinder block exterior walls blown out, and wooden power poles were snapped.[110]

The tornado reached EF3 strength just past the Liberty Expressway as it impacted a one-story brick home, removing the roof and collapsing several exterior walls, snapping or uprooting almost all surrounding mature trees, and tossing a vehicle in the area. A few other homes in nearby neighborhoods also sustained significant structural damage. It then quickly weakened back to EF2 intensity as it completely destroyed the canopy of a service station, snapped large trees, tore the entire roof off of a restaurant, and severely damaged a large Procter & Gamble plant in Albany. Multiple anchored double-wide trailers were completely destroyed at the Marine Corp Logistics Base, and concrete light poles were snapped. Several semi-trailers were tossed and piled atop each other, and multiple other large metal industrial buildings sustained heavy damage in this area as well. A house also had much of its roof ripped off.[110]

Mid-range EF3 damage to a well-constructed church in Albany.

By 3:26 p.m. EST (20:26 UTC), the large and destructive tornado continued through southeastern portions of Albany, prompting a Tornado Emergency for Dougherty County.[118] It re-attained EF3 as it caused significant damage to multiple structures in Albany. A well-constructed cement block church with hurricane straps and rebar reinforcement, as well as a well-constructed frame home, both had their exterior walls collapsed; damage at these locations was consistent with winds of approximately 150 mph (240 km/h), marking the tornado's peak strength. EF2 damage was inflicted to a small residence farther northeast, where large sections of the roof was ripped off. Near the intersection of N County Line Road and Harris Road, the wedge tornado once again regained EF3 intensity as it moved through several mobile home parks, destroying numerous manufactured houses; associated debris was tossed approximately 35 yd (32 m) downwind, and four fatalities were observed. A well-anchored triple-wide mobile home was completely swept away in this area, and a cinder block business was almost entirely flattened. A small church was leveled as well.[119] In Worth County, north of Jewell Crowe Road, several homes sustained significant damage and many large trees were twisted and snapped. A large, well-built brick home sustained low-end EF3 damage in damage in this area as it had much of its roof ripped off and sustained some failure of exterior walls.[110]

As the tornado continued northeast, it completely destroyed an outbuilding and continued to snap or uproot hundreds of hardwood trees. EF1 damage was inflicted to a double-wide mobile home that had its roof ripped off, and to another outbuilding that had its walls collapsed. Despite the tornado's abrupt weakening, it again intensified to EF3 intensity near the intersection of Zion Church Road and Blue Springs Road, where a concrete block church was leveled after its mortar failed between the blocks. After crossing into Turner County, the tornado passed near Ashburn. High-end EF2 damage was inflicted to residences that sustained roof and exterior wall loss, and evidence of a multiple-vortex structure was found. A large home on King Burgess Circle sustained EF3 damage, with two portions of the house completely collapsed and one portion completely slid off the foundation; this was the final instance of EF3 damage associated with the tornado. Mobile homes in this area were damaged or destroyed, and another frame home sustained EF2 roof damage. Tree damage became less prevalent and less severe thereafter in extreme southeastern Crisp County and northwestern Turner County.[110]

A partially collapsed home northwest of Ashburn; damage here was rated as low-end EF3.

Damage intensity varied from EF1 to EF2 in intensity as the tornado entered Wilcox County and passed near the town of Rochelle. Off Double Run Road and CR 41, a small farm building was completely destroyed. Two residences had their windows broken, and a metal building structure was severely damaged, with several anchored metal trusses ripped from the concrete foundation; this resulted in total collapse of the building. Additional metal barns and outbuildings nearby were severely damaged. Along Crawford Dairy Road, several large wooden electrical transmission towers were snapped. Farther northeast, a semi-truck trailer was flipped, flattened, and pushed across the road. Another metal building structure had its southeast corner completely destroyed, and it had a few 2 ft (0.61 m) deep concrete support beams ripped out of the ground. A small home sustained minor roof and siding damage, and several single to double-wide mobile homes were completely destroyed, with debris thrown up to 100 yd (91 m) downstream. Damage to some of the manufactured homes was consistent with a high-end EF2 tornado. The storm crossed Highway 280, destroying several small wooden sheds and fences, and downing numerous trees before finally lifting along Kingfisher Road west of Abbeville at 4:27 p.m. EST (21:27 UTC).

In total, the tornado was on the ground for 70.73 miles (113.83 km) and 72 minutes. The damage path was very wide in some areas, at times expanding to 1.25 miles (2.01 km) in width. It killed five people—including an elderly woman who succumbed to head injuries days later—and injured over 40 others.[110][119] A 2-year-old boy was separated from his mother during the tornado in Albany when a tree crashed into their home. Rescuers searched for the boy for nearly a week before calling it off with no signs of him.[120][121] Twenty-four firefighters from central Georgia assisted with search-and-rescue efforts in Albany in the two days following the tornado.[122]

Non-tornadic events[edit]

Windstorm (January 22)[edit]

In addition to the widespread damage from tornadoes, straight-line winds caused extensive damage in multiple states. One person was killed in Lake City, Florida, when a tree fell on their home.[123] The Sunshine Skyway Bridge, crossing the mouth of Tampa Bay, was closed to all vehicles for several hours; at 5 p.m.; the Florida Highway Patrol stated that winds on the bridge averaged 43 to 52 miles per hour (69 to 84 km/h).[124][125] At Orlando International Airport, wind gusts reached 54 mph (87 km/h).[19] Two tornadoes and powerful straight-line winds left more than 100,000 customers without electricity in the Miami Metropolitan Area.[126]

Nor'easter (January 23–24)[edit]

After January 22, the extratropical cyclone continued to move to the northeast, striking the mid-Atlantic and New England states, and the southeastern portions of Canada while transitioning into a nor'easter, causing high winds, rain, snow, and ice storms. The storms caused wind damage to various buildings, including at least one death, and shuttered several airports and other transportation systems as it passed.[127][128] It also caused significant beach erosion in parts of New Jersey and flooded coastal communities in New Jersey and Long Island.[129][130] On the 24th, wind gusts around the New York City metro area approached 60 mph (97 km/h).[130]

Freezing rain and snow caused treacherous traveling conditions across southern Quebec on January 24; at least 100 accidents were blamed on slippery roads.[131]

Aftermath[edit]

Following overnight tornadoes across Mississippi on January 21–22, Mississippi Governor Phil Bryant declared a state of emergency.[132] Preliminary estimates for damage in Hattiesburg alone reached $200 million.[133] The charity group Christian Services provided meals to 1,600 people in Hattiesburg on January 22.[134] On January 25 President Donald Trump declared a major disaster for Mississippi, enabling the use of federal funding for victims in Forrest, Lamar, Lauderdale, and Perry counties.[135]

President Trump offered his condolences and vowed to provide assistance to Georgia. Liaison officers from the Federal Emergency Management Agency were deployed to Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and Mississippi.[132] The Red Cross began mobilizing relief efforts during the afternoon of January 22 in Georgia.[136] Georgia Governor Nathan Deal declared a state of emergency in seven impacted counties and promised to provide the aid to affected areas.[137] Georgia Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle estimated damage across southwestern areas of the state at $400 million.[138] President Trump declared a major disaster for Dougherty County on January 25, supplementing a prior declaration covering straight-line wind damage incurred on January 2 in Baker, Calhoun, Dougherty, Early, Mitchell, Turner, and Worth counties.[139]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c All dates are based on the local time zone where the tornado touched down; however, all times are in Coordinated Universal Time for consistency.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tornadoes in January". TornadoHistoryProject.com. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  2. ^ Chris Broyles (January 17, 2017). Day 4–8 Severe Weather Outlook Issued on Jan 17, 2017 (Report). Storm Prediction Center. Retrieved January 27, 2017.
  3. ^ Aaron Gleason and Joey Picca (January 20, 2017). Jan 20, 2017 0600 UTC Day 1 Convective Outlook (Report). Storm Prediction Center. Retrieved January 27, 2017.
  4. ^ Rich Thompson and Jeff Peters (January 20, 2017). Jan 20, 2017 1300 UTC Day 1 Convective Outlook (Report). Storm Prediction Center. Retrieved January 27, 2017.
  5. ^ a b Greg Dial and Roger Edwards (January 20, 2017). Mesoscale Discussion 0080 (Report). Storm Prediction Center. Retrieved January 27, 2017.
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External links[edit]

Outbreak summaries from regional National Weather Service offices: