Toronto municipal election, 1988

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The 1988 Toronto municipal election was held to elect members of municipal councils, school boards, and hydro commissions in the six municipalities that made up Metropolitan Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The election was held November 14, 1988.

Metro[edit]

The electoral divisions used for Metro in the 1988 election

The 1988 campaign was the first time most members of Metro Toronto were all directly elected. Toronto had moved to direct elections in 1985, but the other cities had still had a selection of council members dually seated at Metro. In the new council only the five mayors would be granted automatic Metro seats.

East York
Peter Oyler - 11,088
Avril Usha Velupillai - 7,885
Bob Willis - 2,043
Lakeshore Queensway
Chris Stockwell - 10,442
Morley Kells - 7,790
Kingsway Humber
Dennis Flynn - 16,642
Jack Soules - 4,497
Markland Centennial
Dick O'Brien - 13,049
Leonard Braithwaite - 7,296
Rexdale Thistletown
Lois Griffin - acclaimed
North York Humber
Mario Gentile - 19,697
Angelo Natale - 4,795
Black Creek
Maria Augimeri - 19,244
Camilo Tiqui - 2,462
Sherland Chhangur - 2,391
North York Spadina
Howard Moscoe - acclaimed
North York Centre South
Bev Salmon - 10,618
Gordon Chong - 7,223
North York Centre
Norman Gardner - acclaimed
Don Parkway
Marie Labette - 14,443
Courtney Doidron - 3,108
Seneca Heights
Joan King - acclaimed
Scarborough Bluffs
Brian Ashton - 9,957
Bill Belfontaine - 8,348
Scarborough Wexford
Maureen Prinsloo - 6,007
Bryan Prettie - 4,922
Scarborough Centre
Brian Harrison - 8,516
Barry Christensen - 5,150
Keith Sutherland - 1,906
Scarborough Malvern
Bob Sanders - 4,780
Hugh Evelyn - 3,575
Chris Burry - 1,309
Yaqoob Khan - 1,308
Roy Paluoja - 448
Scarborough Highland Creek
Ken Morrish - acclaimed
Scarborough Agincourt
Scott Cavalier - 8,175
Eden Gajraj - 1,861
High Park
Derwyn Shea - 11,473
Ben Grys - 9,204
Trinity Niagara
Joe Pantalone - 8,717
Lamartine Silva - 3,864
Davenport
Richard Gilbert - 7,880
Dennis Fotinos - 5,133
North Toronto
Anne Johnston - acclaimed
Midtown
Ila Bossons - 7,924
Ying Hope - 7,196
Bill Granger - 4,375
Downtown
Dale Martin - 10,322
Janly Pang - 3,950
Don River
Roger Hollander - 11,785
Richard Yue - 5,447
East Toronto
Paul Christie - 11,187
Linda Lynch - 9,361
York Eglinton
Mike Colle - 11,527
Jacquie Chic - 3,571
York Humber
Alan Tonks - acclaimed

Lakeshore Queensway Councillor Chris Stockwell resigned when he won a seat in the 1990 Provincial Election. A by-election was held on November 29, 1990.

Blake Kinahan - 1,770
Bruce Davis - 1,520
Ron Barr - 1,150
Jeff Knoll - 994
Richard Clupa - 657
Helen Wursta - 550
Kevin McGourty - 221
Agnes Ugolini Potts - 213
Branko Gasperlin - 180
Aileen Anderson - 157
Maureen Hunter Dennis - 107
Stephen Elkerton - 62

Toronto[edit]

Mayor[edit]

Incumbent mayor Art Eggleton faced little opposition in his bid for his fourth term of office. His closest opponent was New Democrat Carolann Wright.

Results
Art Eggleton - 91,180
Carolann Wright - 24,479
Bill Roberts - 7,235
Don Andrews - 5,690
John Kellerman - 3,197
Jim Atherton - 2,459
Ben Kerr - 2,204
Zoltan Szoboszlov - 2,202
Alan Ritchie - 1,869

City council[edit]

Ward boundaries used in the 1988 election

There was the largest turnover in councillors in this election since the 1972 election. The left on council ran a joint Reform Toronto campaign focused on curbing the development industry. The vote was a major triumph for the left on city council with two prominent and long-serving conservatives defeated: Fred Beavis, who had served on council since 1961, was defeated by environmentalist Marilyn Churley, and in the north end, conservative Michael Gee lost to Howard Levine.

Ward 1 (Swansea and Bloor West Village)
William Boytchuk (incumbent) - 7,686
David Garrick - 4,092
Ward 2 (Parkdale
Chris Korwin-Kuczynski (incumbent) - 7,242
Francine Dick - 1,312
Michael Sarazen - 412
Thomas Bose - 348
Ward 3 (Brockton)
Tony O'Donohue (incumbent) - 4,269
Jimmy Talpa - 837
Ward 4 (Trinity-Bellwoods and Little Italy)
Martin Silva - 3,529
Nick Figliano - 1,494
Tony Letra - 1,266
Joey Pimental - 675
Ward 5 (Financial District, Toronto - University of Toronto)
Liz Amer- 3,481
Peter Maloney - 2,336
Rachel Foulkes - 1,226
Steve BFG Johnson - 417
Ray Barker - 224
Ward 6 Downtown East
Jack Layton - 5,486
Lois MacMillan-Walker - 1,480
Ward 7 (Regent Park and Cabbagetown)
Barbara Hall - 4,748
Mike Armstrong - 1,536
Allan Boudreau - 499
Ward 8 (Riverdale)
Marilyn Churley - 5,771
Fred Beavis - 4,192
Paul Ralna - 1,028
Ward 9 (East Danforth)
Tom Clifford (incumbent) - 5,220
Mitchell Kosny - 3,498
Michael Tegtmeyer - 370
Ward 10 (The Beaches)
Tom Jakobek - 9,782
Glenn Middleton - 2,443
Ward 11 (The Junction)
Rob Maxwell - 3,299
Peter Zahakos - 3,119
Melania Leshko - 545
Ward 12 (Davenport and Corso Italia)
Betty Disero - acclaimed
Ward 13 (The Annex and Yorkville)
Nadine Nowlan - acclaimed
Ward 14 (Forest Hill)
Howard Levine - 5,477
Michael Gee (incumbent) - 4,995
Ward 15 (Western North Toronto)
Kay Gardner (incumbent) - 7,955
Jeffrey Stutz - 1,966
Bob Murphy - 1,591
Ward 16 (Davisville and Lawrence Park)
Michael Walker (incumbent) - 5,436
Malcolm Martini - 5,249
Joanne Short - 722

Results are taken from the November 15, 1988 Toronto Star and might not exactly match final tallies.

By-election[edit]

Ward 8 Councillor Marilyn Churley resigned upon winning a seat in the 1990 Provincial Election. A by-election was held on November 29, 1990:

Peter Tabuns - 3,217
Linda Lynch - 2,421
Carol Mark - 521
Susan Millingen - 195
Donald Andrews - 137
Daniel Browning - 97

Borough of East York[edit]

The election in East York was a rather tame affair with the mayor, Dave Johnson handily re-elected by a large plurality. On Council five of eight members were new but only one incumbent, Bob Dale was defeated. Incumbent Steve Mastoras was re-elected but demoted to Junior Councillor in Ward 2.[1]

† - denotes incumbent status from previous council

Mayor[edit]

  • Dave Johnson - 20,234
  • Herbert T. McGroarty - 3,531
  • Robert Ruminski - 713

Councillor[edit]

Two councillors were elected to each ward.

Ward 1
Case Ootes - 2,903
Michael Prue - 2,413
John Papadakis - 1,101
Melanie Milanich - 868
John Couvell - 398
Michael Grosso - 303
Alex Parucha - 292
Ward 2
†Bill Buckingham - 4,275
†George Vasilopolous - 3,920
Paul Robinson - 3,351
Ward 3
Helen Kennedy - 3,418
†Steve Mastoras - 3,006
†Bob Dale - 2,561
Anastasios Baxevanidis - 609
Ward 4
Lorna Krawchuk - 4,343
Jenner Jean-Marie - 4,016
Steve Gorgey - 2,686
Ghamsh Kara - 1,713

Trustee[edit]

Ward 1 (3 to be elected)
†Gail Nyberg - 2,419
Janet McKeown - 1,781
Dennis Kolby - 1,503
Randy Silar - 1,146
Grace Stephens - 907
Ward 2 (1 to be elected)
†Connie Culbertson - 3,553
†Ken Maxted - 3,069
Alexander Kory - 1,679
Ward 3 (3 to be elected)
Margaret Hazelton - 2,643
Len Self - 1,884
Shirley Boast - 1,205
Russell English - 609
Ward 4 (3 to be elected)
Elca Rennick - 4,128
Ruth Goldhar - 3,978
Henry Friesen - 1,447
Abdul Hal Patel - 954

Hydro Commission[edit]

(2 to be elected)

†Frank E. Johnson - 13,033
John Flowers - 9,801
Georgia Dunn - 8,964
John Nursey - 3,334

City of Scarborough[edit]

Mayor[edit]

Public Utilities Commission[edit]

  • Cavanagh ; 55,439
  • Beatty ; 50,044
  • Stewart ; 39,197
  • Olders ; 10,530

Metro Councillors[edit]

Scarborough Bluffs

Scarborough Highland Creek

Scarborough Wexford

Scarborough Agincourt

  • Scott Cavalier ; 11,384
  • Gajraj ; 2,636

Scarborough City Centre

  • Brian Harrison ; 11,937
  • Christensen ; 7,294
  • Sutherland ; 2,645

Scarborough Malvern

  • Bob Sanders ; 5,560
  • Evelyn ; 4,121
  • Khan ; 1,480
  • Burry ; 1,473
  • Puluoja ; 514

City Councillors[edit]

Ward 1

  • Harvey Barron ; 5,077
  • Webster ; 1,856

Ward 2

Ward 3

  • John Wardrope ; 4,887
  • Duncan ; 1,948
  • Kazia ; 1,017

Ward 4

  • Lorenzo Berardinetti ; 2,453
  • Kurt Christensen ; 2,449
  • Glynwilliams ; 1,936
  • Ward ; 1,011
  • McDowell ; 318
  • Georges Legault ; 292

Ward 05

Ward 06

  • Paul Mushinski; 1,997
  • Elliott ; 1,514
  • Lombardi ; 1,288
  • Michalopoulo ; 1,078
  • McPherson ; 864
  • Cavoto ; 544
  • Sharma ; 524

Ward 7

  • Fred Johnson, F ; 5,209
  • Borisko ; 4,259

Ward 8

  • Shirley Eidt ; 5,487
  • Murray ; 2,013
  • Chadha ; 651

Ward 9

  • Ron Moeser ; 4,655
  • John Mackie ; 4,539
  • Roberts ; 1,385
  • Cocco ; 1,193
  • Vaya ; 221

Ward 10

  • Ron Watson; 3,961
  • Mahood, P ; 2,828
  • Wilson, M ; 544
  • Cotter ; 478

Ward 11

  • Sherene Shaw ; 2,458
  • Lombardi, D ; 1,308
  • Munro ; 1,155
  • Edmonds ; 1,035
  • Jacobs ; 907
  • Zaidi ; 422

Ward 12

Ward 13

  • Bas Balkissoon ; 2,269
  • Pratley ; 2,249
  • Cheung, J ; 1,148
  • Clements ; 1,003
  • Bob Watson; 541
  • Wilson, L ; 519

Ward 14

  • Edith Montgomery ; 4,956
  • Loughlin, B ; 947
  • Nafis ; 489

City of York[edit]

Mayor[edit]

Mario Faraone was a 47-year-old building designer, consultant, and the owner of the firm F.M. Faraone and Sons company. He campaigned in support of urban tax reform, better traffic planning and affordable housing.[2] He was a member of the Liberal Party, but ran without a party endorsement.[3] A 1990 article in the Toronto Star newspaper drew attention to the fact that the York adjustment committee approved every single proposal put forward by Faraone in 1989 through 1990, despite serious concerns from local residents in some instances. One of the committee members was Faraone's business partner, Jack Capitanio. Faraone denied any suggestion of wrongdoing, and argued that his success rate was a reflection of his experience in the building industry. Capitano also denied suggestions of favouritism.[4] Mayor Fergy Brown responded to the article by saying that he would raise the matter at the next council meeting, and recommended the city's legal department start an investigation.[5] Newspaper reports do not indicate how the matter was resolved. Faraone has remained active in the building trade.[6]

1988 Toronto municipal election, Mayor of Yorkedit
Candidate Total votes  % of total votes Notes
Fergy Brown 21,493 58.74
Tony Grande 13,616 37.21
Mario Faraone 1,482 4.05
Total valid votes 36,591 100.00

City Council[edit]

Of the eight ward races, six incumbents were returned. Newcomer Frances Nunziata beat incumbent Gary Bloor in Ward 7. Jim Fera was also a new member for Ward 5.[7]

Ward 1
Ben Nobleman (incumbent) 2,228
Daria Bradbury 1,885
Ward 2
Tony Mandarano (incumbent) 2,558
Chai Kalevar 809
Frank Rogers 592
Ward 3
Tony Rizzo (incumbent) 1,965
Ron Bradd 1,786
Suzana Dozsa 404
Lisa Alliston 298
Dino Coletti 150
Ettore Reda 72
Roland Saggiorato (withdrew)
Ward 4
Nicolo Fortunato (incumbent) 1,421
Joan Roberts 1,179
Salvatore Sinopoli 458
Sydney King 181
Ward 5
Jim Fera 1,890
Enrico M. Iafolla 1,479
Dan Howells 597
Ward 6
Bob McLean (incumbent) 4,277
Rick Richards 1,367
Ward 7
Frances Nunziata 2,969
Gary Bloor (incumbent) 2,252
Gurpreet Malhotra 83
Ward 8
Bill Saundercook (incumbent, acclaimed)

Board of Trustees[edit]

Ward 1
Karen Hen (incumbent) 2,162
James Stevens 809
Ward 2*
Branko Jovanovich 833
Pete Karageorgos 826
Marion Ward 561
  • Election Night Results - Recount
Ward 2 Post Recount
Branko Jovanovich 828
Pete Karageorgos 827
Marion Ward 561
Due to irregularities by-election ordered by District Court Judge R.G. Conant
Ward 2 By-Election Results - June 19, 1989
Pete Karageorgos 537
Branko Jovanovich 527
Marion Ward 196
Ward 3
Ruth Russell (incumbent) 1,897
Peter Luci 559
Ward 4
Elizabeth Hill 760
Michael Bunker 442
Stefano Scopacasa 363
Charles Ashton 88
Ward 5
Patricia Hainer 1,260
Joseph Morriello 1,051
Ward 6
John Gibson (incumbent) 2,096
Brian Morgan 1,623
Ward 7
Steven Mold (incumbent) 2,551
Jon Gentry 1,005
Ward 8
Madeleine McDowell (incumbent) 1,804
Gaye Lew 1,129

City of North York[edit]

Mel Lastman was re-elected mayor of the North York for the sixth consecutive time. His wife, Marilyn also tried to obtain a council seat but was defeated by former school trustee Bob Bradley. Only one incumbent councillor, Bob Yuill was defeated in Ward 8 by newcomer Joanne Flint. All other councillors were re-elected.[8][9]

Mayor[edit]

  • x-Mel Lastman 98,856
  • Mike Foster 13,486
  • Douglas Campbell 10,290
  • Freddie Jay 1,939

Council[edit]

Ward 1

Ward 2

  • Judy Sgro 6,882
  • Gerry Iuliano 2,398
  • Luigi Cavaleri 926

Ward 3

  • x-Peter Li Preti 5,123
  • Peter Pallotta 808
  • Nella Lanzellotti 759
  • Shanta Ramotar 486

Ward 4

  • x-Frank Di Giorgio 3,658
  • Maria Rizzo 2,933
  • Eleanor Rosen 1,084
  • Gino Cipollone 239
  • Rhea Horwich 226

Ward 5

1988 Toronto municipal election, North York Councillor, Ward Fiveedit
Candidate Total votes  % of total votes Notes
Anthony Perruzza 5,207 50.65
Frank Crudo 1,967 19.13
Bruno Rea 1,557 15.14
John Butcher 951 9.25
Charles Olito 599 5.83
Total valid votes 10,281 100.00

46 out of 47 polls reporting.

  • Frank Crudo was a 26-year-old design and construction company project manager during the 1988 election. He called for a stronger campaign against drugs on North York's streets.[10] When Anthony Perruzza was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario in 1990, Crudo applied to the North York council to be selected as his replacement. He was rejected in favor of Claudio Polsinelli.[11] He later campaigned for Metro Toronto's Black Creek ward in the 1991 municipal election, saying that he was running against the area's "NDP machine".[12] He lost to Maria Augimeri. During the 1993 federal election, Crudo was part of a group of dissident Liberals who supported the candidacy of Peter Li Preti over Art Eggleton, following Eggleton's appointment as the riding's Liberal candidate.[13]
  • Bruno Rea holds a Ph.D. in political philosophy from Oxford University. He worked as a policy adviser for the Ontario Ministry of Labour in the 1980s, researching and writing briefs on workers' compensation and employment standards. He was a member of the Liberal Party. In 1987, he wrote an editorial piece for the Globe and Mail newspaper opposing capital punishment.[14] He was twenty-nine years old during the 1988 election, and called for a crackdown on crime and a slower pace of regional development.[15] He was endorsed by the Toronto Star newspaper, and was originally regarded as a serious candidate for election.[16] He was arrested one week prior to the election, after trying to dispose of 161 signs belonging to Anthony Perruzza, his New Democratic Party opponent, on the grounds of York University at 3:30 in the morning.[17] He pleaded guilty to a charge of mischief in February 1989, and was fined.[18] Rea was listed as a senior policy adviser for the Ministry of Labour in 2000.[19]
  • John Butcher campaigned for the North York City Council on three occasions. In 1982 and 1985, he lost to Irving Chapley in Ward Seven. He was forty-four years old in 1988, and described himself as a lifelong resident of the ward. He acknowledged that he was not likely to win election.[20]

Ward 6

  • x-Milton Berger 6,127
  • Anne Lelovic 2,403

Ward 7

  • x-Irving W. Chapley 5,267
  • Eric Cohen 4,595
  • Mark Arshawsky 516

Ward 8

  • Joanne Flint 5,376
  • Bob Yuill 3,462

Ward 9

  • x-Ron Summers 6,532
  • Ernie Springolo 3,035

Ward 10

  • Don Yuill 3,338
  • Cora Urbel 2,579
  • Marg Middleton 948
  • John Boysen 760
  • Peter Bate 704
  • Ramon Solevilla 546

Ward 11

  • x-Jim McGuffin 6,094
  • Freddy Trasmundi 864

Ward 12

  • x-Barry Burton 3,868
  • John Murphy 2,551
  • Ronald Hyslop 856
  • Peter Allis 527

Ward 13

  • Bob Bradley 4,453
  • Marilyn Lastman 3,761
  • Harvey Brooker 1,031
  • Allan Ginsberg 544

Ward 14

School Board[edit]

Ward 1

  • Sheila Lambrinos 1,195
  • Ted Wray 875
  • Wendy Essex 638
  • Doug Kvistbo 198

Ward 2

  • Bob Churchill 1,463
  • Jim Darvill 774
  • John Campbell 744
  • Lilia Ruffolo 387
  • Angelo Castellano 349
  • Aurelio Caldarelli 238

Ward 3

  • x-Elizabeth Smith 960
  • Stephnie Payne 728
  • Philomen Wright 570
  • Natalie Soobrian 482

Ward 4

  • x-Elsa Chandler 3,083
  • Bob Daggett 762

Ward 5

  • x-Errol Young 2,862
  • Leslie Soobrian 736

Ward 6

1988 Toronto municipal election, North York Board of Education, Ward Sixedit
Candidate Total votes  % of total votes Notes
Cheryl Moscoe 3,852 52.82
Phyllis Weinberg 3,441 47.18
Total valid votes 7,293 100.00
  • Phyllis Weinberg was 56 years old during the campaign, and was described as a psychotherapist and former teacher.[21] She was listed in 1996 as the owner and operator of Orthodox Counselling Services, which offers support on stress management and family issues in the Orthodox Jewish community.[22] She had previously campaigned for the North York Hydro Commission in 1985, finishing sixth out of nine candidates. She was twice asked to stop campaigning on the grounds of a public school in 1988, and was criticized for giving candy to children near school property. Weinberg argued that the complaints against her were part of a "mud-slinging campaign" designed to prevent her from winning the seat.[23] She planned to campaign for the ward six seat again in the 1991 election, but withdrew before election day.[24]

Ward 7

  • x-Mae Waese acclaimed

Ward 8

  • x-Gerri Gershon 6,205
  • Trevor Tymchuk 1,203

Ward 9

  • x-Shelley Stillman 5,803
  • Rose Yunger 1,756

Ward 10

  • x-Darlene Scott 4,997
  • Rena Gordon 2,052

Ward 11

Ward 12

  • x-Ken Crowley acclaimed

Ward 13

  • x-Dan Hicks 5,235
  • Gini Sharma 2,509

Ward 14

  • x-Ralph Belfry 4,741
  • Dash Shah 1,461

Hydro Commission[edit]

(2 elected)

  • x-Carl Anderson 57,280
  • Bob Dyer 44,177
  • x-Jack Bedder 37,121
  • Donald Hubbs 13,183
  • Jack Arshawsky 12,506
  • Irving Bricks 10,160

References[edit]

  1. ^ Holden, Alfred; Fruman, Leslie (November 15, 1988). "Easy win for incumbent mayor Johnson". Toronto Star. pp. B3, B7. 
  2. ^ Darcy Henton, "Close race shapes up in smallest city", Toronto Star, 7 November 1988, A6.
  3. ^ Susan Huxley, "Outgoing York mayor backing council veteran as successor", Globe and Mail, 11 November 1988, A20.
  4. ^ Kevin Donovan, "The man who always gets his way", Toronto Star, 22 November 1990, A1.
  5. ^ Kevin Donovan, "City of York allegations of conflict to be probed", Toronto Star, 23 November 1990, A6.
  6. ^ Humber-York Community Council Agenda, Meeting No. 5, 20 June 2003, p. 22, accessed 27 October 2006.
  7. ^ "Civic Elections '88 The Results City of York". Toronto Star. November 15, 1988. p. B7. 
  8. ^ James, Royson (November 15, 1988). "Bittersweet victory for Mel as Marilyn loses". Toronto Star. p. 8. 
  9. ^ "Civic election '88". The Globe and Mail. November 16, 1988. p. A16. 
  10. ^ "The candidates", Toronto Star, 10 November 1988, A15.
  11. ^ Stan Josey, "Ex-North York councillors join race for vacant seat", Toronto Star, 14 October 1990, A3.
  12. ^ Stan Josey, "Area's diversity emphasized", Toronto Star, 24 October 1991, NY2.
  13. ^ Theresa Boyle, "Disgruntled York Centre Liberals set to go to court", Toronto Star, 4 February 1993, NY2.
  14. ^ Bruno Rea, "All defences of death penalty are full of holes", Globe and Mail, 14 April 1987, A7.
  15. ^ Sterling Taylor, "Wide social gulf runs down Black Creek valley", Toronto Star, 25 October 1988, A7.
  16. ^ "North York choices", Toronto Star, 5 November 1988, D2.
  17. ^ Dorothy O'Neill and Cal Miller, "Candidate in Ward 5 found with rival's signs", Toronto Star, 7 November 1988, A1; Robert MacLeod, "Candidate in Ward 5 found with rival's signs", Globe and Mail, 8 November 1988, A1; Lila Sarick, "False news was spread, municipal candidate says", Globe and Mail, 12 November 1988, A15 [the title of this piece relates to a separate matter].
  18. ^ "Campaign sign-nappers fined", Globe and Mail, 16 February 1989, A16.
  19. ^ "Cancer Coalition Meets to Develop Action Plan" [press release], Canada NewsWire, 6 March 2000, 12:44 report. The press release does not indicate if Rea was working for the provincial or federal ministry, although the former seems more likely.
  20. ^ Sterling Taylor, "Wide social gulf runs down Black Creek valley", Toronto Star, 25 October 1988, A7.
  21. ^ "The Candidates", Toronto Star, 11 November 1988, A12.
  22. ^ Isabel Vincent, "I'm Phyllis, and I'm a Jewish mother-in-law", Globe and Mail, 22 May 1996, A1.
  23. ^ Paul Taylor, "School yard candidate is kicked out", Globe and Mail, 25 October 1988, A20.
  24. ^ "Record number of candidates in York", Toronto Star, 17 October 1991, NY1.