Tournoi de Paris

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Tournoi de Paris
Tournoi de Paris 2012 (PSG vs Barcelona).JPG
Barcelona player Xavi receiving the trophy after winning the 2012 edition.
Founded 1957
Number of teams 4 (1957–2010);
2 (2012)
Current champions Barcelona (1st title)
Most successful club(s) Paris SG (7 titles)

The Tournoi de Paris, also known as Trophée de Paris, is a pre-season association football invitational competition hosted by French club Paris Saint-Germain at their home ground Parc des Princes, in Paris, France. The competition was founded in 1957 by former hosts Racing Paris to celebrate their 25th anniversary. Since the tournament's inception, the winners have received different trophies.[1][2]

Regarded as French football's most prestigious friendly tournament,[1] the Tournoi de Paris was held annually each summer between 1957 and 1966 by Racing Paris. It briefly returned in 1973 with new hosts Paris FC.[3] In 1975, current hosts Paris Saint-Germain successfully relaunched the competition. After an almost uninterrupted 18-year spell (the 1990 edition was not held),[1] PSG abandoned the tournament in 1993 for financial reasons.[4]

However, PSG revived the Tournoi de Paris in 2010 to commemorate its 40th anniversary.[5] From 1957 to 1993, four teams (including the hosts) played in a knockout format. The tournament featured two semi-finals, a third-place play-off, and a final.[6] Modeled off Arsenal's Emirates Cup, the competition switched to a group-stage format in 2010.[3] Not held in 2011, it was renamed Trophée de Paris in 2012, and featured a single prestigious match. This was the tournament's last edition to date.[7]

Brazilian team Vasco da Gama won the inaugural Tournoi de Paris in 1957, while Barcelona won the last edition in 2012.[7] Paris Saint-Germain is the most successful club in the competition's history, having lifted the trophy on seven occasions.[1] Belgian outfit Anderlecht is next on the title count with three, while fellow French club Racing Paris and Brazilian sides Santos and Fluminense are the only other teams to have won the competition more than once. PSG arch-rivals Olympique de Marseille is among a group of clubs to have won the tournament once.[6]

History[edit]

From Racing to PSG[edit]

Alfredo Di Stéfano and Real Madrid lost the final in the inaugural edition.

The Tournoi de Paris was founded in 1957 by former hosts Racing Paris to celebrate their 25th anniversary. The Parisian side invited Spanish club Real Madrid, Brazilian team Vasco da Gama and German outfit Rot-Weiss Essen to the tournament played at the Parc des Princes. Vasco won the inaugural edition after defeating the Real Madrid of Raymond Kopa, Alfredo Di Stéfano and Francisco Gento in the final (4–3).[1]

From 1957 to 1993, the tournament was played in knockout format. Four teams (including the hosts) participated in the competition, which featured two semi-finals, a third-place play-off, and a final.[6] The tournament was held annually each summer between 1957 and 1966 by Racing Paris. It briefly returned in 1973, with Paris FC as the new hosts.[3]

Following Paris FC's failed attempt to relaunch the competition, current hosts Paris Saint-Germain and club president Daniel Hechter successfully did so in 1975. Reinforced for the occasion with Dutch legend Johan Cruyff, PSG lost to Spanish side Valencia in the final (0–1) in front of a sold-out Parc des Princes.[1]

The 1978 edition proved to be the most unbalanced of them all. A few weeks before the 1978 FIFA World Cup, Paris SG invited the national football teams of Netherlands and Iran. The Clockwork Orange won the competition with ease, hammering Club Brugge in the final (7–1).[1]

First title and last defeat[edit]

Dutch legend Johan Cruyff played for PSG in the 1975 edition.

The Red-and-Blues finally won their tournament in 1980, when it seemed all hope was lost.[1] Dominique Bathenay's last-minute equalizer from the penalty spot in a 4–4 thriller versus Standard Liège sent the game to the penalty shoot-out, where PSG clinched its first Tournoi de Paris.[6]

In 1982, PSG fans were looking forward to the debut of star signing Osvaldo Ardiles. However, his first match with the capital club could not be worse. Brazilian team Atlético Mineiro inflicted Paris SG's biggest defeat ever in the tournament as the capital club bowed out in the semi-finals (0–3).[1]

Not all debuts have been bad, though. In 1985, new PSG manager Gérard Houllier was looking to reinforce the team's attack. He tested Pierre Vermeulen in the first game of the Tournoi de Paris against AS Saint-Étienne. Vermeulen would sign for the club and become an undisputed starter in PSG's title-winning campaign.

Although misleading, another good start was that of Jules Bocandé. Touted as PSG's new star,[1] the Senegal striker scored six goals in three matches at the tournament (five in 1986 and one in 1987), including four in the final against Sporting CP in 1986.[6] Unfortunately, he would never hit those heights in official competitions. During his two seasons at the French capital, Bocandé only managed to score six goals, as many as in the Tournoi de Paris.[1]

The 1987 edition was PSG's most catastrophic, and was an indication of what would be a difficult season. For the first time since 1976, the club finished last in the Tournoi de Paris. The defeat to Dinamo Zagreb (1–3) would be the last conceded by the Parisians in 90 minutes. Since then, Paris SG have only been beaten on penalties.[1]

Last title and revival[edit]

Germain the Lynx was first unveiled at the Tournoi de Paris in 2010.

From 1975 to 1993, only one edition of the tournament was cancelled. It was in 1990 due to the poor condition of the pitch. The Rolling Stones' concert at the Parc des Princes, a few weeks earlier, was to blame. The Tournoi de Paris returned in 1991 and saw Paris defeat Sporting CP (2–1) in the final. The game also saw the end of a 17-year collaboration that began in 1974. It was PSG's last match with historic shirt sponsor RTL.[1]

In 1993, François Calderaro's solitary goal gave Paris the victory against AJ Auxerre in front of 12,000 spectators. The capital side had won the trophy for the seventh time since 1975. It would turn out to be the last Tournoi de Paris until 2010 and PSG's last title to date as the club abandoned the tournament for financial reasons.[4]

After 17 years of absence, PSG revived the Tournoi de Paris in 2010 to commemorate its 40th anniversary.[5] Ahead of the tournament, PSG unveiled "Allez Paris Saint-Germain", to the tune of "Go West" by Village People, and Germain the Lynx as the club's official anthem and mascot, respectively.[8]

The Parisian side invited Porto, Roma and Girondins de Bordeaux.[8] Modeled off Arsenal's Emirates Cup, the competition switched to a group-stage format for the 2010 edition.[3] PSG defeated Porto (1–0) and shared the points with Roma (1–1), while Bordeaux were held by Roma (1–1) and downed Porto (2–1). Both French clubs finished with four points, but Bordeaux scored more goals and won the Tournoi de Paris on goal difference.[5]

Name change[edit]

Not held in 2011, Paris SG renamed it Trophée de Paris in 2012. It featured a single prestigious match against Barcelona. The Spanish side lifted the trophy, winning on penalties (1–4) after the match ended in a draw (2–2) at the Parc des Princes. Rafinha and Lionel Messi from the penalty spot gave Barcelona a comfortable lead, before PSG's Zlatan Ibrahimović and Zoumana Camara forced a penalty shoot-out. This was the tournament's last edition to date.[7]

Tournaments[edit]

Edition Year Winner Runner-up Third Fourth Source
1 1957 Brazil Vasco da Gama Spain Real Madrid France Racing Paris Germany Rot-Weiss Essen [9]
2 1958 France Racing Paris England Bolton Wanderers Brazil Flamengo Hungary Újpest [10]
3 1959 France Racing Paris Germany Fortuna Düsseldorf Brazil Vasco da Gama Italy Milan [11]
4 1960 Brazil Santos France Racing Paris Bulgaria CSKA Sofia France Stade de Reims [12]
5 1961 Brazil Santos Portugal Benfica Belgium Anderlecht France Racing Paris [13]
6 1962 Serbia Red Star Belgrade Austria Rapid Wien France Racing Paris Brazil Santos [14]
7 1963 Brazil Botafogo France Racing Paris Belgium Anderlecht Hungary Újpest [15]
8 1964 Belgium Anderlecht Germany Borussia Dortmund France Stade de Reims Brazil Santos [16]
9 1965 Czech Republic Sparta Prague France Stade Rennais Belgium Anderlecht France Racing Paris [17]
10 1966 Belgium Anderlecht France Racing Paris Czech Republic Sparta Prague Brazil Vasco da Gama [18]
11 1973 Netherlands Feyenoord Germany Bayern Munich France Paris FC France Marseille [19]
12 1975 Spain Valencia France Paris SG Brazil Fluminense Portugal Sporting CP [20]
13 1976 Brazil Fluminense European Union Europe Brazil Brazil Olympic France Paris SG [21]
14 1977 Belgium Anderlecht Hungary Ferencváros France Paris SG Brazil Vasco da Gama [22]
15 1978 Netherlands Netherlands Belgium Club Brugge France Paris SG Iran Iran [23]
16 1979 Portugal Benfica Serbia Red Star Belgrade France Paris SG Brazil Brazil Olympic [24]
17 1980 France Paris SG Belgium Standard Liège Portugal Benfica Netherlands Ajax [25]
18 1981 France Paris SG Germany Eintracht Frankfurt Brazil Vasco da Gama France Saint-Étienne [26]
19 1982 Brazil Atlético Mineiro Croatia Dinamo Zagreb France Paris SG Germany 1. FC Köln [27]
20 1983 Romania Romania France Paris SG Brazil Botafogo Israel Maccabi Netanya [28]
21 1984 France Paris SG Croatia Hajduk Split Switzerland Servette Brazil Botafogo [29]
22 1985 Belgium Waregem France Paris SG Germany 1. FC Köln France Saint-Étienne [30]
23 1986 France Paris SG Portugal Sporting CP France Saint-Étienne Romania Steaua București [31]
24 1987 Brazil Fluminense France Bordeaux Croatia Dinamo Zagreb France Paris SG [32]
25 1988 France Montpellier France Paris SG Serbia Partizan Switzerland Servette [33]
26 1989 France Paris SG France Montpellier Brazil Vasco da Gama Portugal Porto [34]
27 1991 France Marseille Brazil Flamengo France Paris SG Portugal Sporting CP [35]
28 1992 France Paris SG France Monaco Germany Borussia Dortmund England Liverpool [36]
29 1993 France Paris SG France Auxerre Germany Eintracht Frankfurt Brazil Fluminense [37]
30 2010 France Bordeaux France Paris SG Italy Roma Portugal Porto [5]
31 2012 Spain Barcelona France Paris SG N/A [7]

Titles by club[edit]

Lionel Messi and Barcelona are the current champions of the Tournoi de Paris.
Club Winners Years won
France Paris SG 7 1980, 1981, 1984, 1986, 1989, 1992, 1993
Belgium Anderlecht 3 1964, 1966, 1977
France Racing Paris 2 1958, 1959
Brazil Santos 2 1960, 1961
Brazil Fluminense 2 1976, 1987
Brazil Vasco da Gama 1 1957
Serbia Red Star Belgrade 1 1962
Brazil Botafogo 1 1963
Czech Republic Sparta Prague 1 1965
Netherlands Feyenoord 1 1973
Spain Valencia 1 1975
Netherlands Netherlands 1 1978
Portugal Benfica 1 1979
Brazil Atlético Mineiro 1 1982
Romania Romania 1 1983
Belgium Waregem 1 1985
France Montpellier 1 1988
France Marseille 1 1991
France Bordeaux 1 2010
Spain Barcelona 1 2012

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "Anecdotes autour du Tournoi de Paris". PSG.fr. 12 July 2010. Retrieved 23 January 2011. 
  2. ^ "Le Trophée du Tournoi de Paris !". PSG.fr. 30 July 2010. Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Le Paris SG va relancer le Tournoi de Paris en juillet". Le Point. 24 December 2009. Retrieved 9 May 2010. 
  4. ^ a b "Le PSG relance le Tournoi de Paris dès 2010". PSG MAG. 24 December 2009. Retrieved 5 February 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c d "Football - Tournoi de Paris : Bordeaux maître dans la capitale". RTL.fr. 1 August 2010. Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
  6. ^ a b c d e "Tournoi International de Paris 1957-1993 (Paris-France)". RSSSF. Retrieved 9 May 2010. 
  7. ^ a b c d "PSG-FCB : Accroché et spectaculaire !". PSG.fr. 4 August 2012. Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
  8. ^ a b "Le PSG prend un nouveau virage". PSG.fr. 23 July 2010. Retrieved 26 July 2010. 
  9. ^ "1957 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  10. ^ "1958 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  11. ^ "1959 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  12. ^ "1960 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  13. ^ "1961 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  14. ^ "1962 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  15. ^ "1963 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  16. ^ "1964 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  17. ^ "1965 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  18. ^ "1966 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  19. ^ "1973 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  20. ^ "1975 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  21. ^ "1976 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  22. ^ "1977 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  23. ^ "1978 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  24. ^ "1979 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  25. ^ "1980 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  26. ^ "1981 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  27. ^ "1982 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  28. ^ "1983 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  29. ^ "1984 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  30. ^ "1985 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  31. ^ "1986 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  32. ^ "1987 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  33. ^ "1988 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  34. ^ "1989 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  35. ^ "1991 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  36. ^ "1992 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  37. ^ "1993 Tournoi de Paris". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 

External links[edit]

Official websites