Towanda, Kansas

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Towanda, Kansas
City
Motto: "Land of Many Waters"
Location within Butler County and Kansas
Location within Butler County and Kansas
KDOT map of Butler County (legend)
KDOT map of Butler County (legend)
Coordinates: 37°47′45″N 96°59′58″W / 37.79583°N 96.99944°W / 37.79583; -96.99944Coordinates: 37°47′45″N 96°59′58″W / 37.79583°N 96.99944°W / 37.79583; -96.99944
Country United States
State Kansas
County Butler
Government
 • Type Council-Mayor
 • Mayor Jennifer Shaults[1]
Area[2]
 • Total 1.06 sq mi (2.75 km2)
 • Land 1.06 sq mi (2.75 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,293 ft (394 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 1,450
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 1,438
 • Density 1,400/sq mi (530/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 67144
Area code 316
FIPS code 20-71125 [5]
GNIS feature ID 0474579 [6]

Towanda is a city in Butler County, Kansas, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 1,450.[7]

History[edit]

Towanda was founded in 1870.[8] Towanda is an Osage-language name meaning "many waters".[9]

The town was severely damaged by a cyclone in 1892.[10]

21st century[edit]

In 2010, the Keystone-Cushing Pipeline (Phase II) was constructed a few blocks west of Towanda (immediately west of SW River Valley Rd), running north to south through Butler County, with much controversy over tax exemption and environmental concerns (if a leak ever occurs).[11][12]

Geography[edit]

Towanda is located at 37°47′45″N 96°59′58″W / 37.79583°N 96.99944°W / 37.79583; -96.99944 (37.795921, -96.999380),[13] along the Whitewater River. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.06 square miles (2.75 km2), all of it land.[2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 53
1890 156 194.3%
1910 275
1920 718 161.1%
1930 424 −40.9%
1940 374 −11.8%
1950 417 11.5%
1960 1,031 147.2%
1970 1,190 15.4%
1980 1,332 11.9%
1990 1,289 −3.2%
2000 1,338 3.8%
2010 1,450 8.4%
Est. 2014 1,427 [14] −1.6%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 1,450 people, 524 households, and 397 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,367.9 inhabitants per square mile (528.1/km2). There were 577 housing units at an average density of 544.3 per square mile (210.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 95.3% White, 0.3% African American, 1.1% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.4% Pacific Islander, 0.5% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.7% of the population.

There were 524 households of which 39.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.9% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 24.2% were non-families. 20.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.77 and the average family size was 3.15.

The median age in the city was 34.5 years. 30% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.4% were from 25 to 44; 25.1% were from 45 to 64; and 11.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 50.0% male and 50.0% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 1,338 people, 492 households, and 383 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,804.8 people per square mile (698.1/km²). There were 537 housing units at an average density of 724.3 per square mile (280.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.79% White, 0.37% African American, 0.37% Native American, 0.22% Asian, 0.22% from other races, and 2.02% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.75% of the population.

There were 492 households out of which 39.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.1% were married couples living together, 8.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.0% were non-families. 20.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the city the population was spread out with 29.3% under the age of 18, 9.2% from 18 to 24, 29.0% from 25 to 44, 20.5% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 96.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $41,875, and the median income for a family was $47,188. Males had a median income of $32,250 versus $24,167 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,815. About 5.1% of families and 6.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.0% of those under age 18 and 5.0% of those ages 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Towanda is home to the district office of Circle Unified School District, USD #375, which covers approximately 175 square miles.[15]

Primary and secondary education[edit]

Circle High School, located in Towanda, has one of the top graphic arts departments in the state. They are the top computer art school recognized at the Scholastics Art and Writing Awards, since 2005.[citation needed]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Directory of Kansas Public Officials - Towanda". League of Kansas Municipalities. Retrieved 27 May 2015. 
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-29. 
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ "2010 City Population and Housing Occupancy Status". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved March 6, 2011. 
  8. ^ Kansas State Historical Society (1916). Biennial Report of the Board of Directors of the Kansas State Historical Society. Kansas State Printing Plant. p. 152. 
  9. ^ "Profile for Towanda, Kansas". ePodunk. Retrieved 5 June 2014. 
  10. ^ Mooney, Vol. P. (1916). History of Butler County Kansas. Standard Publishing Company. p. 224. 
  11. ^ Keystone Pipeline - Marion County Commission calls out Legislative Leadership on Pipeline Deal; April 18, 2010.
  12. ^ Keystone Pipeline - TransCanada inspecting pipeline; December 10, 2010.
  13. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  14. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  15. ^ "District Profile". Circle Public Schools. Retrieved 27 May 2015. 
  16. ^ Frank H. Maynard, Cowboy's Lament: A Life on the Open Range (Lubbock, Texas: Texas Tech University Press, 2010), p. 3, ISBN 978-0-89672-705-2

External links[edit]

City
Schools
Maps