Toward a Science of Consciousness

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The Science of Consciousness (TSC; formerly Toward a Science of Consciousness) is an international academic conference that has been held biannually since 1994. It is organized by the Center for Consciousness Studies of the University of Arizona. Alternate conferences are held in Arizona (either Tucson or Phoenix), and the others in locations worldwide. Each conference attracts hundreds[citation needed] of attendees. The conference is devoted exclusively to the investigation of consciousness.[1]

Associated people[edit]

The main organizer is Stuart Hameroff, an anestheologist and the director of the center that hosts the conference. One of the speakers at the first conference, David Chalmers, co-organized some of the following ones, until the event became too far away from the scientific mainstream[2]. Plenary or keynote speakers have included Daniel Dennett and Roger Penrose.[citation needed]

Conference books[edit]

Three books published by MIT Press have resulted from the conference.[3][4][5]

John Benjamins published a book containing selected proceedings from TSC 1999.[6]

Academic coverage[edit]

(None of the following peer-reviewed journals are involved with the organization of TSC.)

An essay review Toward a science of consciousness:Tucson I and II by J. Gray was printed in ISR Interdisciplinary Science Reviews Volume 24 Issue 4 (1 April 1999), pp. 255–260.[7]

A review of TSC 2012 may be found in the Journal of Consciousness Studies.[8]

In the Journal of Consciousness Exploration & Research, Christopher Holvenstot reviewed TSC 2011, likening it to The Greatest Show on Earth.[9]

Michael Punt reviewed TSC 2002 in the journal Leonardo.[10]

Media coverage[edit]

Chapter 8 of John Horgan's book The Undiscovered Mind is entirely devoted to his experiences at the first (1994) TSC conference.[11]

The conference and its main organizers were the subject of a long feature in June 2018, first in the Chronicle of Higher Education, and re-published in The Guardian. Tom Bartlett concluded that the conference was "more or less the Stuart [Hameroff] Show. He decides who will and who will not present. [...] Some consciousness researchers believe that the whole shindig has gone off the rails, that it’s seriously damaging the field of consciousness studies, and that it should be shut down."[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy/Consciousness". Stanford University. Retrieved 2014-01-13.
  2. ^ Bartlett, Tom (19 June 2018). "Out of their minds: wild ideas at the 'Coachella of consciousness'". The Guardian. Retrieved 19 June 2018.
  3. ^ Hameroff, S; et al., eds. (1996). Toward a Science of Consciousness - The First Tucson Discussions and Debates. MIT Press. ISBN 9780262082495.
  4. ^ Hameroff, S; et al., eds. (1998). Toward a Science of Consciousness II - The Second Tucson Discussions and Debates. MIT Press. ISBN 9780262082624.
  5. ^ Hameroff, S; et al., eds. (1999). Toward a Science of Consciousness III - The Third Tucson Discussions and Debates. MIT Press. ISBN 9780262581813.
  6. ^ Kunio, Y; et al., eds. (2002). No Matter, Never Mind - Proceedings of Toward a Science of Consciousness: Fundamental approaches, Tokyo 1999. John Benjamins Publishing. ISBN 978-9027251534. See: "No Matter, Never Mind". Retrieved 2014-01-12.
  7. ^ This journal appears in both print (ISSN 0308-0188) and online (ISSN 1743-2790)."Review of conference by J. Gray". Retrieved 2014-01-12.
  8. ^ "A Thousand Flowers". Journal of Consciousness Studies. 19 (7–8): 247–70. July–August 2012.
  9. ^ "Toward a Science of Consciousness 2011: The Greatest Show on Earth". Journal of Consciousness Exploration & Research. 2 (4): 656–665. June 2011. See: "TSC 2011: The Greatest Show on Earth". Retrieved 2014-01-27.
  10. ^ "Toward a Science of Consciousness (Review)". Leonardo. 36 (1): 89–90. February 2003. doi:10.1162/leon.2003.36.1.89. See: "Review of conference by Michael Punt". Retrieved 2014-01-12.
  11. ^ Horgan, John (2000). The Undiscovered Mind – How the Human Brain Defies Replication, Medication, and Explanation. New York: Free Press. ISBN 978-0684865782.
  12. ^ Bartlett, Tom (19 June 2018). "Out of their minds: wild ideas at the 'Coachella of consciousness'". The Guardian. Retrieved 19 June 2018.

External links[edit]