Toxoflavin

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Toxoflavin[1][2]
Toxoflavin.png
Names
IUPAC name
1,6-Dimethylpyrimido[5,4-e][1,2,4]triazine-5,7(1H,6H)-dione
Other names
Toxoflavine; Xanthothricin; Xanthotricin
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.213.079
Properties
C7H7N5O2
Molar mass 193.166 g·mol−1
Appearance Bright yellow solid
Melting point 172 to 173 °C (342 to 343 °F; 445 to 446 K) (decomposes)
Hazards
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
1.7 mg/kg (IV, mouse)
8.4 mg/kg (oral, mouse)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Toxoflavin is a toxin produced by a variety of bacteria including Burkholderia gladioli. It also has antibiotic properties.[3]

Toxoflavin acts as a pH indicator, changing between yellow and colorless at pH 10.5.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Merck Index, 11th Edition, 9480
  2. ^ Toxoflavin, at the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database
  3. ^ Machlowitz, Roy A.; Fisher, W. P.; McKay, Betsey S.; Tytell, Alfred A.; Charney, Jesse (1954). "Xanthothricin, a new antibiotic". Antibiotics and Chemotherapy. 4: 259–261.